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Thread: Router table fence - question

  1. #1
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    Question Router table fence - question

    The plans (NYW) I'm working from use MDF for the fence. There are movable sections of the fence to either side of the bit. In the plans a "T" slot is used to capture a "T" bolt that locks the fence in place. This bothers me a bit (no pun intended) since MDF is so prone to delamination.

    Has anyone built this fence in this way? Have you experienced any problems?

    I was thinking about putting a grove in the fence and placing an aluminum "T" track in it. However, once you grove the MDF there is only about 1/4" of material left, not enough to hold a screw....so...I was thinking epoxy?

    Any suggestions?
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  2. #2
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    Rennie i built my whole router table out of good baltic birch. Used Baltic birch for the fence as well.

    My build for a fence consisted of making a Angle iron type section with baltic birch. Then to keep it 90 cut triangles and place them behind.

    Then in either side of the rouyter bit location i added another piece of baltic birch with a bevel cut at the end to be able to bring the two pieces close to the bit as possible.

    Routed two long slots through both sides of the fence and then used t bolts through to bar knobs as adjustment tighteners. Two on each side.

    My fence slides on two t bolts that are in T rail on either side of the router bit but in the table top.

    Heck tomorrow i will get you a picture its way easier than trying to describe what i did.
    cheers

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rennie Heuer View Post
    Has anyone built this fence in this way? Have you experienced any problems?
    I didn't build one but I do run the standard older Rockler fence which functions just as you describe. I also have extra deep fence faces out of 1-1/4" MDF for when I spin really big bits. Same fence faces for about 5 years. No delamination and no crushing on the rear t-slot from adjusting the faces or on the front t-slot from feather boards or stop blocks.

    The stop blocks are built so that there is only about 1/32" of squeeze area before the t-bolt head hits the tongue on the back of the blocks. The tongue prevents crushing and keeps the stop block from trying to twist.

    The front to back positioning of the fence is also in a through-type t-s;pt in 1 -1/4" MDF. No issues here either. The screw is one of the most powerful basic machines and you could damage things if you really had your Wheaties and wanted to. This is true for many locking mechanisms and adjustments on our tools though.

    This is a poor drawing but, you get the drift on the tongue feature. The tongue is just shy in length of the t-slot shoulders thickness.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Stop Block.jpg  
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rennie Heuer View Post
    Has anyone built this fence in this way? Have you experienced any problems?
    I built mine (link) with laminate for the moveable fences. No problems in two years of use, and I don't see there being any in the future.

    You could go with a T track if you want, but the routed T slot works perfectly well. I think the laminate is the key. It's strong and flat and square.
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  5. #5
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    Rennie,

    I didn't use the NYW plans, but I did make a movable fence out of MDF. The rest of the fence assembly is made of BB Plywood.
    I have T slots cut in the face (for feather boards & stop blocks) and on the back to allow adjustability.

    The MDF has been finished with BLO and then paste wax. So far I haven't had any problems with it. I figured that if I did, those two pieces were pretty easy to make any way.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails rtr-table fence1.jpg   rtr-table fence2.jpg  
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  6. #6
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    My router table fence attaches to the Incra tablesaw fence. It's all made of Baltic Birch ply, with the exception of the movable face, which is UHMW plastic, about 5/8" thick. I used countersunk flathead hex screws to attach it to the t-track on the face of the plywood fence.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #7
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    Thanks for all the input! What I've decided to do, after reading all the posts, is to use phenolic plywood for the sliding fences. I had some lying around. I will use the aluminum tracks both front and rear of the fence. Back for fence adjustment, front for feather boards and stops. The Plywood offers a better grip for the screws used to hold the tracks in, although I will probably drill a few extra screw holes just to be sure.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rennie Heuer View Post
    Thanks for all the input! What I've decided to do, after reading all the posts, is to use phenolic plywood for the sliding fences. I had some lying around. I will use the aluminum tracks both front and rear of the fence. Back for fence adjustment, front for feather boards and stops. The Plywood offers a better grip for the screws used to hold the tracks in, although I will probably drill a few extra screw holes just to be sure.
    rennie you could double the thickness on your fence to give your screws more substrate to get ahold of..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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  9. #9
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    Rennie you want precision, take a look at Pat Warners fence. Just dont blame me if this leads you to more procrastination. Make one and go. Read my signature line .......Were burning daylight. I thought you were getting serious and getting into business on this woodworking stuff.
    Project Manager in me says you way over the time limit we gonna be into penalties soon.

    http://www.patwarner.com/
    cheers

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Rennie you want precision, take a look at Pat Warners fence. Just dont blame me if this leads you to more procrastination. Make one and go. Read my signature line .......Were burning daylight. I thought you were getting serious and getting into business on this woodworking stuff.
    Project Manager in me says you way over the time limit we gonna be into penalties soon.

    http://www.patwarner.com/
    With all due respect to Mr Warner, that's way too much fence for me. Probably worth the $480, but routing a natural material that is in constant motion to within .001"? Seems to me that might be considered overkill. Maybe it's needed in some situations.
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