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Thread: Reworking a Career

  1. #1
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    Reworking a Career

    Well,
    the big news at chez bulken this week is that I'm currently 'between jobs'. Now, before everyone gasps horribly, other than the obvious financial pressures which a new job will have to cover, I'm more than OK with this situation. Sparing you the gory details, they let me go, and as a result I will be able to use that to my advantage through retraining and/or other grants and so on.
    I'm taking a few days to refocus and figure out what new direction I want to pursue. I've been in the transportation and warehousing industry for several years now, but I'm honestly not 'tied' to the industry at all.
    I've got several options I'm considering, and am heavily revamping/updating the resume. There is a local agency to help with that, and I'll be utilizing them heavily. Especially on the retraining front.
    There are several local colleges with carpentry courses, and I'm going to look into taking classes (if I can fit them around any new job I find), with an eye towards getting into the trades.
    -Ned

  2. #2
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    Ned,

    Having been there and done that several times in my life I can attest to the fact that there is no better opportunity to expand your horizons than to have someone show you the door!

    You have the right attitude and, I'm sure, the smarts and talent to make this not only a life changing experience, but a life improving experience.

    Go get em!
    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

  3. #3
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    ned, sorry `bout the job .....before you switch to carpenterin` for a living please know that it takes a strange bird to make the transition from doing woodworkin` for a hobby to doing it for a living.........there`s quite a few of us "strange birds" here who will be happy to offer advice or give a kick in the seat of the pants as required .......if you decide to persue the vocation remember that it`s a lifelong learning experience that has never made folks wealthy......but the rewards at the end of the day are worth it to me
    tod
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  4. #4
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    Ned,
    Keep that positive attitude, and you'll do well.

    I was put in that same position three different times during my 'working life,' and each time I managed to come out of it in a better situation.

    Hang in there!
    Jim D.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tod evans View Post
    ned, sorry `bout the job .....before you switch to carpenterin` for a living please know that it takes a strange bird to make the transition from doing woodworkin` for a hobby to doing it for a living.........there`s quite a few of us "strange birds" here who will be happy to offer advice or give a kick in the seat of the pants as required .......if you decide to persue the vocation remember that it`s a lifelong learning experience that has never made folks wealthy......but the rewards at the end of the day are worth it to me
    tod
    tod,
    wealth is a relative term, I'll gladly take you up on that kind offer however. I'm keeping nearly all options open; I'd rather not stay in warehousing/transportation, time for a change since it is upon me. As for taking up carpentry or a similar trade, well that's an option. I was actually thinking about drywall/flooring aspects. Or paint, or...
    -Ned

  6. #6
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    Hey Ned,
    Looks like you have a good handle on this. I changed industries a few times in my career and never regretted it!

    Take advantage of the vocational counseling. Think about what is important to you in a job and what's not. Keep those doors open and look at lots of options.

    I'm taking a woodworking class at community college but every time I walk down the hall I find a course I wish I could take "hmm, EMT, chef, metalworking...."

    Keep us posted!
    Don't believe everything you think!

  7. #7
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    Good luck with the decision. Making a mid-life career change presents unique problems but also can lead to surprising rewards.
    Remember, you always have friends for support.

  8. #8
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    Thanks guys,
    I'm working on keeping a positive attitude. Now if I could just reinvent myself as a 'studio' woodworker/portrait photographer/artist and still make both ends of the month/money equation wave at each other I'd be golden. If I wind up staying here through the fall, I know two things that will Have to happen: 1) the shop will be built as soon as funds allow, even if it is just a 'drag and drop' shed with a sub-panel installed once spring comes. and 2) I'll be creating a new DBA and hanging a new shingle.
    -Ned

  9. #9
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    Hi Ned,
    This time will probably be scary and exciting but it does allow you time to think about what you really want to do. When I was a little kid I liked my block set, stacking, balancing creating the visual and enjoying the tactile. I liked sports and being physical, and art, drawing and stuff. Some how they all work together, the physical in lifting and toting, muscling stuff around, the art, in my design and colors, and the strength and balance of design and proportion.
    What did you like as a kid?? (See where I am going with this?)
    Oh by the way, some years I have been unemployed 200 times, ( sometimes only for 5 minutes ) but just like Tod, We are still standing and we are proud of what we do! Hang on and hang in.
    Shaz
    I am a registered voter and you can be too. We ( registered voters ) select the moderators for this forum by voting every six months for the people we want to watch over this family forum.
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    Shaz
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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    Well,
    the big news at chez bulken this week is that I'm currently 'between jobs'.
    I know how you feel. I was in the transportation industry for 10 years (railroad) but when my daughter was born I decided that it was time to get out. The pay was great, but having to work 3rd shift and having Tuesday and Wednesday for a weekend was not condusive to a good family life style. I never really regrestted the move (except for the pay that is.)

    In any case things worked out for me beacuse I looked for a job that was woodworking related and yet not in the normal defination such as carpentry or cabinetry. In the end I found my spot as a machinist for a boat building place. Its the perfect position for me because it requires a lot of skill and it really marry's steel with wood. For instance my current job is to apply some stainless steel trim around a groove set into all the granite counter tops, cabinets, coffee tables and circular stair handrails.

    All I am saying is, try looking outside the box so to speak and you will find a lot of places where your love of woodworking will come into play, even if it does not apply to woodworking directly. And one more thing, always put down woodworking as one of your hobbies on your resume. When managers see that, they always think of woodworkers as patient and diligent, and that is a good trait to have in any worker.

    Good luck my friend.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

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