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Thread: Mystery wood - SOLVED!!

  1. #1
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    Talking Mystery wood - SOLVED!!

    I've had this board for over 20 years, brought it 2400 miles when I moved. I have no idea what it is, but it is too nice, and too large (9" x 8' x 1" thick) to just toss or give away. I need help.

    It is very light and quite soft. Anyone have any ideas?
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Rennie Heuer; 09-18-2010 at 01:03 AM.
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  2. #2
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    My 1st wild guess is CVG Fir because of all the pitch pockets, but the early/late wood distinction is lacking. Most likely a conifer of some sort.

    A fresh planed end grain shot might be helpful also. And how heavy/dense is it ?

    And yeah, way too nice to ditch.
    Don Orr

    Woodturners make the World go ROUND

  3. #3
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    It is genuine shelf wood. Especially pretty stuff when painted.
    "Folks is funny critters."

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  4. #4
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    Hi Rennie,

    I went through my copy of Wood Identification and Use by Terry Porter and published by the Guild of Master Craftsman I the UK.

    The best match I could find squares with what Don has just stated. It mentions dark brown resin canals which are distinctive.

    It is very close to the picture of Sugar Pine in the book.

    Here is one citing from the Forest Service: http://www.na.fs.fed.us/Spfo/pubs/si...ambertiana.htm

    You said you carried it 2400 miles. Was this where it originated?
    Regards,
    Bill Antonacchio

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Orr View Post
    My 1st wild guess is CVG Fir because of all the pitch pockets, but the early/late wood distinction is lacking. Most likely a conifer of some sort.

    A fresh planed end grain shot might be helpful also. And how heavy/dense is it ?

    And yeah, way too nice to ditch.
    here ya go - Click image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    It is genuine shelf wood. Especially pretty stuff when painted.
    Thanks Frank. I love you too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Antonacchio View Post
    Hi Rennie,

    I went through my copy of Wood Identification and Use by Terry Porter and published by the Guild of Master Craftsman I the UK.

    The best match I could find squares with what Don has just stated. It mentions dark brown resin canals which are distinctive.

    It is very close to the picture of Sugar Pine in the book.

    Here is one citing from the Forest Service: http://www.na.fs.fed.us/Spfo/pubs/si...ambertiana.htm

    You said you carried it 2400 miles. Was this where it originated?
    Sugar pine sounds close, if not right on. It is not very dense at all - quite light and soft. Although, given the natural range of SP, I don't know how it wound up in NY.

    I inherited it from my dad when he passes in '87. I lived in NJ then, he in upstate NY. I brought it with me when I moved to Idaho.
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

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  6. #6
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    i hear tell rennie that wood can travel long distances in just afew days you must be slipping you even seen it happen once
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    i hear tell rennie that wood can travel long distances in just afew days you must be slipping you even seen it happen once
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

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  8. #8
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    I vote Sugar Pine. Looks like it would make GREAT pipes
    A Turn N Time
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  9. #9
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    looked like spanish cedar to me, guess it has no scent.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the Pic

    The pic of the end grain shows it to not be true vertical grain (quarter sawn) but rift sawn. Still thinking softwood /conifer especially when you describe hardness and weight. Pines, spruces, firs can be very tough to identify visually on a macro scale, but can be readily identified microscopically. The USFS lab will indentify up to 5 samples for free. I don't have the link handy, but Google should help. Hoadley's book on wood identification may be of some interest if you don't already have it.

    Sugar pine is not native to upstate NY, but lumber yards can get it easily here. And what some call sugar pine may just be a generic light colored pine and not the actual species, as I'm sure you already know.
    Don Orr

    Woodturners make the World go ROUND

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