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Thread: Need a little guidance

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Midlands of South Carolina
    Posts
    271

    Need a little guidance

    My dad just handed down some tools to me. He was never much into these tools, so he did not have need of them.

    Also, I have no documentation, so I don't know how to tear them down for cleaning.

    I will keep these - for sentimental reasons if nothing else, but would like to get use out of them if possible (safe).

    This is a little related to woodworking because I need to know how to protect the wood


    Next steps?
    Last edited by Rick Prosser; 09-28-2010 at 08:48 PM. Reason: Edited due to Privacy issues and exposure

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    15,807
    Congrats on the family heirlooms, that is very cool!

    I'd say join a club or range (or both) and get some instruction
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    bethel springs TN, but was born and raised in north east PA
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    3,132
    Dave nice collection your dad gave ya. As i've been a country boy all my live, i grew up using guns since i was old enough to walk i think. As a boy of about 7 or 8 me and my brothers would take the 22's and spend all day out in the woods looking for something to shoot.. When we turned 14 each one of us would get a 12 gauge single shot goose gun, and a 303 british. We all looked foward to that day.
    As far as your guns, they look from here to be in really good shape.just keep them oiled and make sure the barrels don't have any thing stuck in them, like a shell. I say go set up some targets and have fun.
    I know that my family is getting ready for there yearly sighting in party up in the hills of PA. They will have family and friends there for two days, and will be firing off 10's of thousands of rounds.
    Steve

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,470
    rick, i would say that stu is right.. on the best way to get familiar with them.. i too have been around them all my life but i dont use them for hunting strickly archery for the last thirty plus years the 16 gauge is gonna be hard to get ammo for at least around here..its a great gun but they have mover to be less popular and the 12 and 20guages are the key guns today.. that 22 is your best one for having fun.. its cheap to shoot and can take anything in your area if you need to..that revolver is for close work and more house and personal property protection..not sure about your state but you might need to get that licensced and yu will need a bill of sale or a slip from grand dad stating that he gave it to you..dont know your states regs,, it appears to be a smith and wesson which is avery good brand and is good quality..so that is all i can do for you the rest is now up to you..have fun but be safe with them..and check out your local gun club to get some instruction..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
    Posts
    6,097
    Rick, now that you are in the country, those are tools also. As has been said, check for obstructions in the barrels, can do this by running a rod or stick with the actions open down the barrel from the muzzle end.
    That 16 gauge is a sweetheart of a gun. A shotgun that will bring down rabbits and birds as well as deer with a slug in it. A good home defense gun also. Many debate the issue of the sound of "racking" the slide for home defense. I personally don't keep one in the chamber, but it is loaded in the tube so if in need quickly I can grab, rack and go. The negative discussion on this issue is giving away your presence to a bad guy(s) if your home is being invaded. It is a personal choice.

    The 22, as others have said, great guns. Cheap to shoot, low to no recoil, tons of fun. It still is a weapon and will kill, so be aware.

    The revolver, 38, many call that type a "Detective's Special". This also makes a great gun for the bedside table. Middle of the night situations it is instantly available and quite competent at close ranges. There are also shot shells available, great for hiking and shooting snakes. Pull the hammer back and if it has a point on the indside this is your firing pin. If that is the case, this is the type of revolver that you must carry on an empty chamber. This is the type of revolver that if dropped on the hammer a possible discharge could happen so carrying on an empty chamber prevents that.

    Storage, if in your shop, like your other tools be aware of surface rust situations. Complete dissassembly for cleaning, not needing unless you are experiencing problems with the gun. Do not store in a gun case, zippered or hardshell as they will hold moisture and promote rust. After handling, wipe down with a cloth, I use Rem oil found in a spray can in Walmart. All three of these shoot ammo that should be found in most Walmarts. For the 22 it won't be as finicky about ammo due to being a bolt action. But the Thunderbolts are notorious for being junk so stay away from them. 22 ammo is different from brand to brand and many 22 rifles are brand sensitive meaning if you are really looking for tight groups on a target, don't blame the gun until you have shot many brands through it. Keep your targets, shoot from a bench rest (another wood working project!) and label them, it is a fun way to learn your gun's desires. The 16 gauge, my pump and bolt action seem to prefer high brass, don't know why, but again, buy different ammo in small quantities and notice how they shoot, your aim point and how the gun cycles them.
    Along the top of the barrel will be the brand name of your gun. Google that and a wealth of information will appear. Through the internet, I have amassed reams of printed material about my guns and how to care for them, field strip them, repair, maintain as well as use.
    Well that is all off of the top of my head. What a trio. Hope you respect the honor of being the holder of these through your lifetime as they aren't guns as much as family history. You are the current owner of that history. I have a couple of my dad's guns and have written their history down so my girls will know it correctly when I pass them on to them. Feel free to PM me for specific information. Get yourself some safety glasses, ear muffs (and a couple extra because guns attract people who want to shoot). Be safe and have fun!!!
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    new york city burbs
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    10,184
    find someone local who is either a member of a range, or at least knows of someone, so you can let them give you one lesson in the basics of firing and handling firearms.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
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    13,427
    I typically shoot my guns at the state shooting ranges. Check with your state's conservation department's website to see if/where the ranges are located. I usually shoot at the man'd ranges, where everything is very controlled. My wife even enjoys going to shoot there as she feels safe. They typically teach classes for hunting and beginning shooters. I've found they will work with you one on one if you request (no charge usually). The state range here charges $3 per hour vs. $9 - $12 at the local shops.

    My suggestion would be to clean and lubricate them good, get familiar with their safeties and how they are operated. I'd talk with a local gun shop(s) and find one you feel comfortable with. You can take the guns in (unloaded) and ask about the right ammunition and different ones for what you'll be using them for.

    I typically use the cheapest ammo for plinking in my guns, but have gotten into reloading for my .223 since I can do them for about $.11 per round vs. $.50 per round store bought.
    Last edited by Darren Wright; 09-26-2010 at 03:11 PM.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Shively View Post
    ...A shotgun...good home defense gun also. Many debate the issue of the sound of "racking" the slide for home defense....
    Think of that sound as a deterrent. One of the scariest souns to hear in the dark is the sound of a Remington 870 bolt slamming home.

    Most bad guys will run away upon hearing it. Those that don't are intent on doing you harm anyway, so it's then good to be 'hot,' "cause you're gonna need that round anyway.

    My 870 sits in a nearby closet with five rounds of #00 buck in the tube. Come by unexpected or unannounced at night, and you'll hear that scary sound first-hand.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
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    11,825
    All good advice so far. I'll double ditto the clean and lube advice. Rem Oil is good but my preference is CLP Break Free. Either, you can't go wrong.
    For "defense" all three can have a role depending the situation.
    Depending, also, on whether you have children in the home you may have to choose how to store.
    If no children, I would keep the revolver close at hand in the bedroom and loaded.
    You are in the woods, keep the rifle and shotgun loaded but not chambered near doors.
    And do shoot them occasionally. The practice is good for you and you won't wear them out.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    1,407
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    Think of that sound as a deterrent. One of the scariest souns to hear in the dark is the sound of a Remington 870 bolt slamming home.

    Most bad guys will run away upon hearing it. Those that don't are intent on doing you harm anyway, so it's then good to be 'hot,' "cause you're gonna need that round anyway.

    My 870 sits in a nearby closet with five rounds of #00 buck in the tube. Come by unexpected or unannounced at night, and you'll hear that scary sound first-hand.
    A friend if mine is a cop and often goes on drug busts. He claims that the best thing to settle things down in a raid is the sound of a pump shotgun being pumped. He said that most of the time people in the house just put their hands on their head of lay down on the floor.

    If you use a shotgun for protection in a house, he says use bird shot and not buck. Buck will penetrate sheetrock and you can injure friendlies. And a load of bird shot will do the job required.

    I owned that 22, or one just like it. If it's the same one I owned, you can have it converted to a clip instead of a single shot. You still have to work the bolt between shots but it's quicker than fumbling with another round.

    Mike
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 09-26-2010 at 05:57 PM.
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

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