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Thread: I need to remove a lot of paint from some door jams

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    1,103

    I need to remove a lot of paint from some door jams

    Hi gang.

    I'm trying to get rid of a lot of coats of paint from several door frames (jams) in our townhouse. I mean, the PO went paint crazy over the years on these.

    I tried sanding, scraping and now I want to give chemical stripper a try.

    Question is, which would be recommended? I will be priming and painting again when I get the old garbage off. I don't want any of the stripper to soak into the wood so I will have problems with the new finish.

    Help?

    Aloha, Tony
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

    Registered voting member

    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
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    10,604
    Oh man that's a miserable job
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
    Posts
    6,098
    Tony, I would think this is the job for this tool.
    http://www.harborfreight.com/power-t...ion-tools.html
    I seriously detest chemical when the job can't be done on sawhorses over plastic or in a controlled type of environment. Just adding my two cents here. Sounds like a tough job, good luck.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Outside the beltway
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    5,250
    Tony if you can pick up a few cans of Spray stripper it will make the job very easy. Just mask off around the jams. What most people fail to realize when stripping is that if you are brushing stripper on you only make one pass over the intended area. So load the brush, then let it work and load again after you scrap off the 1st coating. What I like about the spray you can load the spray on with out causing the initial seal to break which lessons the active ingredients working strength.
    Last edited by Dave Hawksford; 10-01-2010 at 12:33 PM.
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Windsor, CT
    Posts
    36
    I've had good success with the citrus type strippers.
    Slather the area with the stuff and then - this is key - cover the area with waxed paper and let the stripper work for an hour or so. The stripper works by fumes and if you concentrate the fumes and prevent evaporation with the waxed paper everything works great.
    One or two applications may be necessary. Follow up each application with a putty knife. For the last application I use coarse steel wool soaked in the stripper to rub the surface down.
    Since you are following up with primer and paint again, a good rubdown with steel wool, a paint scraper and a putty knife in the nooks and crannies should be sufficient.
    I recommend the shellac based "Kilz" type primer to seal any areas of concern.
    OBTW< use rubber gloves.
    Good luck with a dirty, mean and nasty job.


    Walter in CT

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Whittier, CA, USA
    Posts
    512
    Use a heat gun and scraper. No sloppy mess.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/catalog...ry=&q=heat+gun

    Cheers,
    Dan Gonzales
    Whittier, CA, USA
    Dona nobis pacem

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    Tony,
    Get a can of "Dad's Easy Spray" I buy mine from True Value. It contain Metholyne Chloride which is the same thing that Dave uses in his shop for refinishing and I use it to. Make sre you don't get it on your skin and it will damage lenolium but nothing works better. Wear heavy rubber gloves.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    Welcome to the Family Walter!

    Tony, I'd try the heat gun first, I too hate the chemical stuff, even outdoors, but IN the house

    I think the heat gun would get rid of a lot of it, and then maybe the chemical stuff

    Don't envy you at all
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    1,103

    I need to remove a lot of paint from some door jams

    Thanks for the replies guys. I will look for the products you have mentioned.

    I already tried sanding (slow and really dusty) and I can't get into the corners that well, scraping (both with and without the heat gun) and, because I need to get this DONE, I am willing to resort to chemicals.

    I have taken off all the casings I can get off without damage, so I can strip them outdoors. I am not worried about the existing floor because it is going to be covered by new laminate flooring.

    See, this was a rental unit, and the owner's just kept painting over with no prep work that I can see. Some of the layers peel right off, some areas. Other areas won't let loose, and leave lots of feathers of paint from the sanding/scraping, making it too slow work getting all that cleaned off.

    The paint is mostly latex and very rubbery. There's probably 6 layers that I can count. It is really a mess. I am glad I am not a refinisher/painter, but it is my home now.

    I will keep you posted as to what I do and accomplish.

    Aloha, Tony
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

    Registered voting member

    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,439
    Nothing to add Tony, but don't envy you.

    Walter, Welcome to the family!
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

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