Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 42

Thread: Snapshots and Stories of an Addition...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    3,383

    Snapshots and Stories of an Addition...

    Let me set the stage...

    We have four young(ish) kids, 3 boys and 1 girl, and we live in a 3 bedroom house. So far we've managed, but we were realizing that something was going to have to give as the kids aged. We wrestled with several options over last winter, and eventually we ruled out moving, and we also ruled out building a bedroom in the basement.

    And so, I turned to sketchup and started working on ideas, running them past my wife (and others) and at the same time checking into and securing a builder.

    Here are a few before shots of our place:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	snapshot-SE-sm.JPG 
Views:	66 
Size:	130.6 KB 
ID:	49624Click image for larger version. 

Name:	snapshot-SW-sm.JPG 
Views:	68 
Size:	121.4 KB 
ID:	49625

    As you can see it has a great big honking roof on it, and an attached garage also on the front. The plan we settled on was to rip off the top of the garage, and build a bedroom up there. The second floor hall landing would be extended to the front of the house, so it would not affect the current bedrooms.

    Here is the sketch of what we were (more or less) looking for:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	plan-from-se.jpg 
Views:	59 
Size:	83.8 KB 
ID:	49620 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	plan-from-sw.jpg 
Views:	55 
Size:	78.2 KB 
ID:	49621


    A couple of things that I think are worth noting. We did NOT want the addition to be flush with the front of the garage, rather we set it back 3ft.
    We also designed it with 6'6" side walls, so that it would have a partially vaulted space. In effect the addition should look like a (large) dormer.

    Yes, we gave up some floorspace in the new room, but the goal was to have something that looked like it belonged, rather than having it look like a huge imposing thing. I think if it lined up with the front of the garage, you would see this large 2-story wall at the front of the house, and visually it would be almost overwhelming. As well, we have both read through the classic architecture/design book "A Pattern Language" and tried to apply some of it's wisdom in this design.

    Once the kids move out, the plan is for this to become my wife's study/craft room, which was another impetus to make sure it was designed well. In particular, we invited light on all three exterior walls. There are 3 large windows on the front/south face, There are two 24x48 skylights on the left/west side of the roof, and we also managed to tuck in a window on the east side, up against the house. This brings in tons of light, and also will help with cross-breezes.

    The arrangement with our builder was that I would deal with the city, to get variances and permits, I would also do the trimming, the flooring, and the painting. The rest (demolition + construction) was contracted out.

    They just finished up their part, and this is where we stand today:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_6054.jpg 
Views:	66 
Size:	55.9 KB 
ID:	49622 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_6055.jpg 
Views:	71 
Size:	76.6 KB 
ID:	49623

    We're quite pleased so far, but still have a fair bit of work to do to get to the final product!

    I plan to write a bit and post a bit about some of my own part of the process.
    Last edited by Art Mulder; 10-01-2010 at 06:25 PM.
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    Very good Art, I'll be watching for the sequel.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    2,667
    Nice.

    So you didn't have to re-do the foundation underneath the addition/garage?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,427
    Would have liked to seen the pics along the journey, but probably would have gotten fat eating all that popcorn. Looks like the house has always been that way...looks good.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    3,383
    Variances and Permits:

    I learned a bit about zoning and all that while going through this project. I particular, I learned that in our zone, a 1-story structure was allowed to be 2ft closer to the property line than a 2-story structure.

    This explains why our garage was built such that it is offset 2ft closer to the side yard than the rest of the house.

    Our first decision, therefore, was to either build the 2nd floor addition 2ft in from the side wall or to get a variance. There really was no choice to be made. Setting it in 2ft on one side would look weird, and if I set it in 2ft on both sides, then we would run into trouble with the door into the main house, since that is where the hall is located. Not to mention the convoluted framing that we'd have to do to set things in 2ft from the bearing wall.

    The variance process was... slow. It takes 3 weeks from application to get a hearing in front of the committee. But other than that it was okay. The folks at the planning office were fine, gave me some pointers and reassured me that minor variances like this were really no big deal.

    So a month later I had a variance in hand, and now could get a permit, right?

    Four, count-em, FOUR visits to the city hall building dept later I finally had a permit. I will just gloss over this painful memory and give this bit of advice: Get an engineer. Really, once I gave in and went to the engineer things where just so much smoother. It really wasn't even that expensive.

    The main point of contention was those 6'6" walls:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	concept11-front-cutaway.jpg 
Views:	40 
Size:	53.6 KB 
ID:	49626

    Because we wanted 6'6" walls, there were NOT ceiling joists going side to side tying the walls together. Rather, the collar ties were going to be a couple feet up the rafters. That, in a nutshell, was the problem. So we had to get a ridge beam engineered, and then another beam engineered to support the ridge beam above the center window, and this affects the beam across the front of the garage, and on and on.

    Seriously, next time, just go find an engineer first. It cost us about 3 weeks doing it my way.
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    3,383
    Quote Originally Posted by Mohammad Madha View Post
    Nice.

    So you didn't have to re-do the foundation underneath the addition/garage?
    Nope. The garage has a full foundation, same depth as the house.

    And Darren, I'll post a few shots.
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,427
    Sorry you had to go through that Art, but good stuff to know...

    I had a similar experience with my old house. Planned an addition, had it all drawn up, submitted it to the permits department, rejected. Same plans and paperwork submitted by a friend that was a builder, approved.

    We ended up selling that house as it was and not doing the addition, so not sure what we would have ran into going forward.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,600
    Looks real nice. It really fits in with the architecture of the house without looking like an add on. Nice job.
    Having a bedroom over a garage has always made me a bit nervous about Co2 though.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    3,383
    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Wright View Post
    Would have liked to seen the pics along the journey,
    Pics along the journey #1

    I'm not a builder, but my dad was a finishing carpenter, and I've been on a few building sites in my youth and picked up a bit here and there. So I thought I knew a few things.

    Ha.

    I was surprised right from the get go. I expected them to totally demolish the roof of the garage, rip it right off, and then start fresh.

    Nope.
    They started inside the garage ripping down all the ceiling drywall, and some of the walls (where the beam needed support).
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4730.jpg 
Views:	49 
Size:	51.6 KB 
ID:	49629 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4733.jpg 
Views:	49 
Size:	57.5 KB 
ID:	49630

    Then they cut the bottom chord of the trusses, made a gap, and fitted in the big honking LVL beam that was going to support the front of the addition.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4738.jpg 
Views:	51 
Size:	85.4 KB 
ID:	49631

    And after that they got up there and started placing all the 2x10's for the floor joists. The roof was still totally closed!
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4740.jpg 
Views:	50 
Size:	76.6 KB 
ID:	49632

    Only then, did they start peeling back the shingles and cutting into the roof.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	roof-open.jpg 
Views:	52 
Size:	100.3 KB 
ID:	49635

    It made total sense one the builder explained it to me. He wanted to preserve the existing roof as much as possible. This also preserved the existing side walls. No need to go to the expense or work (or waste!) of tearing them down only to have to build them back up again.

    After that things just ticked along with the framing and so on.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4775.jpg 
Views:	50 
Size:	83.4 KB 
ID:	49633 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4787.jpg 
Views:	50 
Size:	64.7 KB 
ID:	49634
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    3,383
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gibson View Post
    ... always made me a bit nervous about Co2 though.
    Bob,

    There are two reasons why I wasn't really worried...

    a) there was nowhere else to build it, and people have been building over garages for ages. My builder reports that bonus rooms over garages are pretty much standard in new construction these days. Lots are so skinny here, that they have to cram it all in.

    b) this is the other reason:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_5617.jpg 
Views:	49 
Size:	74.0 KB 
ID:	49636 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_5619.jpg 
Views:	48 
Size:	89.8 KB 
ID:	49637
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_5620.jpg 
Views:	43 
Size:	91.7 KB 
ID:	49638 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_5622.jpg 
Views:	41 
Size:	79.7 KB 
ID:	49639

    We did spray foam insulation all around: top, sides, and bottom. I doubt that anything is getting through that, along with the drywall, taping, and the rest of the construction practises.

    (I never run the car in the garage anyways. It's always turned off within seconds of parking, and never run for more than 20 sec before pulling out.)
    Last edited by Art Mulder; 10-01-2010 at 08:32 PM.
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

Similar Threads

  1. Okay I'm a Sucker For Christmas Stories
    By Paul Douglass in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-24-2013, 06:18 PM
  2. Boxes for Snapshots - Another Set
    By glenn bradley in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-05-2012, 07:59 PM
  3. Boxes for Snapshots
    By glenn bradley in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 05-13-2011, 03:41 PM
  4. Two stories
    By Paul Gallian in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-23-2010, 10:41 PM
  5. Haircut stories
    By Robert Schaubhut in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 02-12-2007, 10:00 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •