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Thread: Online Hardwood Guide

  1. #1
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    Online Hardwood Guide

    Hi

    I came across a site put up by the Hardwood Manufacturers Association. They have a species guide to domestic North American hardwoods. It's not very in depth, but it packs a lot if info into a short article on our common hardwoods.

    Species Guide

    There's also a section called Design Values which I haven't read, but it also looks interesting.
    All the best,
    Ian G

    **Now holding auditions for a catchy new signature**

  2. #2
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    Thanks for the link, Ian.

    Looking thru the species reminds me of a question I've had about maple. The guide lists hard maple as 'Acer saccharinum' or 'A. nigrum' and soft maple as 'A. rubrum' or 'A. saccharinum'.

    So my question...

    How come 'A. saccharinum' is both hard and soft maple? Different parts of tree (heart vs. sap)?

  3. #3

    Wood info

    This site from the USDA will give you good info also. Click on "common names" and type in Red Oak for example in the Query box and then click on run query. It has hundreds of species.

    http://www2.fpl.fs.fed.us/

    This is another

    http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Hemenway View Post
    So my question...

    How come 'A. saccharinum' is both hard and soft maple? Different parts of tree (heart vs. sap)?
    That's a mystery to me. I always figured A. saccharinum (sugar maple) was the hardest of the maples. The big lumber yard around here doesn't sell any soft maple, but they do separate the hard maple into 2 bunks - maple heart and maple sap. I have always assumed that this was because of the colour only. Sapwood for clear finishes and heartwood for paint grade.

    I'll see if I can find out anything more about this.
    All the best,
    Ian G

    **Now holding auditions for a catchy new signature**

  5. #5

    Maple

    You are clearly not confused enough yet, try this http://www2.fpl.fs.fed.us/ and as I described above type in Maple.

    Regis B. Miller
    Center for Wood Anatomy Research
    Forest Products Laboratory
    Jugo Ilic
    Forestry and Forest Products
    USDA

    hammock maple Acer barbatum Michx. Acer floridanum (Chapman) Pax Aceraceae Mexico
    southern sugar maple Acer barbatum Michx. Acer floridanum (Chapman) Pax Aceraceae Mexico
    sugar maple Acer barbatum Michx. Acer floridanum (Chapman) Pax Aceraceae Mexico
    maple Acer caesium (Reinw. ex Blume) Kosterm. Acer laurinum Hassk.
    Acer niveum Bl. Aceraceae India
    maple Acer caesium (Reinw. ex Blume) Kosterm. Acer laurinum Hassk.
    Acer niveum Bl. Aceraceae Pakistan
    Philippine maple Acer caesium (Reinw. ex Blume) Kosterm. Acer laurinum Hassk.
    Acer niveum Bl. Aceraceae Philippines
    Chinese maple Acer campbellii subsp. flabellatum (Rehder) Murray Aceraceae China
    Chinese maple Acer campbellii subsp. sinense (Pax) DeJong Aceraceae China
    field maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae Eastern China
    field maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae Japan
    hedge maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae Eastern China
    hedge maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae Japan
    common maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae Europe
    dyed maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae Europe
    European maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae Europe
    field maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae Europe
    hedge maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae Europe
    Sylvan maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae United Kingdom
    field maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae USA
    great maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae USA
    hedge maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae USA
    Norway maple Acer campestre L. Aceraceae USA
    Japanese maple Acer capillipes Maxim. Aceraceae Japan
    hornbeam maple Acer carpinifolium Siebold & Zucc. Aceraceae Japan
    Japanese maple Acer carpinifolium Siebold & Zucc. Aceraceae Japan
    Korean maple Acer caudatum subsp. ukurunduense (Trautv. & May.) Murray Aceraceae Korea
    mountain maple Acer circinatum Pursh Aceraceae USA
    vine maple Acer circinatum Pursh Aceraceae USA
    Japanese maple Acer cissifolium (Siebold & Zucc.) C.Koch Aceraceae Japan
    China maple Acer davidii Franch. Aceraceae China
    China maple Acer davidii subsp. grosseri (Pax) DeJong Aceraceae China
    Russian maple Acer ginnala Maxim. Aceraceae Eastern Asia
    ginnala maple Acer ginnala Maxim. Aceraceae Germany
    bark maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    California mountain maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    Douglas maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    dwarf maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae North America
    dwarf maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    mountain maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    New Mexico maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    red maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae North America
    Rocky Mountain maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    Rocky Mountains maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae Canada
    Rocky Mountains maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    shrubby maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    Sierra maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    soft maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae USA
    California mountain maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae Mexico
    Douglas maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae Mexico
    dwarf maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae Mexico
    mountain maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae Mexico
    New Mexico maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae Mexico
    Sierra maple Acer glabrum Torr. Aceraceae Mexico
    bigtooth maple Acer grandidentatum Nutt. Aceraceae USA
    canyon maple Acer grandidentatum Nutt. Aceraceae USA
    hard maple Acer grandidentatum Nutt. Aceraceae USA
    large-toothed maple Acer grandidentatum Nutt. Aceraceae USA
    maple Acer grandidentatum Nutt. Aceraceae USA
    sugar maple Acer grandidentatum Nutt. Aceraceae USA
    Uvalde bigtooth maple Acer grandidentatum Nutt. Aceraceae USA
    western sugar maple Acer grandidentatum Nutt. Aceraceae USA
    bigtooth maple Acer grandidentatum Nutt. Aceraceae Mexico
    sugar maple Acer grandidentatum Nutt. Aceraceae Mexico
    Uvalde bigtooth maple Acer grandidentatum Nutt. Aceraceae Mexico
    Florida maple Acer grandidentatum var. sinuosum (Rehder) Little Acer brachypterum Woot. & Standl.
    Acer floridanum (Chapman) Pax Aceraceae USA
    hammock maple Acer grandidentatum var. sinuosum (Rehder) Little Acer brachypterum Woot. & Standl.
    Acer floridanum (Chapman) Pax Aceraceae USA
    southern sugar maple Acer grandidentatum var. sinuosum (Rehder) Little Acer brachypterum Woot. & Standl.
    Acer floridanum (Chapman) Pax Aceraceae USA
    sugar maple Acer grandidentatum var. sinuosum (Rehder) Little Acer brachypterum Woot. & Standl.
    Acer floridanum (Chapman) Pax Aceraceae USA
    paperback maple Acer griseum (Franch.) Pax Aceraceae China
    balkans- maple Acer heldreichii Orph. ex Boiss. Aceraceae Europe
    Balkan maple Acer hyrcanum Fisch. & C.A.Mey. Aceraceae Greece
    Japanese maple Acer japonicum Thunb. ex Murray Aceraceae Japan
    Chinese maple Acer laevigatum Wall. Aceraceae China
    chalk maple Acer leucoderme Small Aceraceae USA
    palebark maple Acer leucoderme Small Aceraceae USA
    sugar maple Acer leucoderme Small Aceraceae USA
    whitebark maple Acer leucoderme Small Aceraceae USA
    whitebark maple Acer leucoderme Small Aceraceae Mexico
    Italian maple Acer lobelii Ten. Aceraceae Italy
    Chinese maple Acer longipes subsp. catalpifolium (Rehder) DeJong Acer catalpifolium Rehder Aceraceae China
    Manchurian maple Acer mandshuricum Maxim. Aceraceae China
    Manchurian maple Acer mandshuricum Maxim. Aceraceae Korea
    Japanese maple Acer maximowiczianum Miq. Acer nikoense Maxim. Aceraceae China
    Japanese maple Acer maximowiczianum Miq. Acer nikoense Maxim. Aceraceae Japan
    Japanese maple Acer mono Maxim. Aceraceae China
    Japanese maple Acer mono Maxim. Aceraceae Japan
    Manchurian maple Acer mono Maxim. Aceraceae China
    Manchurian maple Acer mono Maxim. Aceraceae Japan
    China maple Acer monspessulanum L. Aceraceae Mediterranean Region
    Japanese maple Acer monspessulanum L. Aceraceae Mediterranean Region
    ash-leaf maple Acer negundo L. Aceraceae United Kingdom
    ash-leaved maple Acer negundo L. Aceraceae United Kingdom
    Manitoba maple Acer negundo L. Aceraceae United Kingdom
    ash maple Acer negundo L. Aceraceae USA
    ash-leaf maple Acer negundo L. Aceraceae USA
    ash-leaved maple Acer negundo L. Aceraceae North America
    boxelder maple Acer negundo L. Aceraceae USA
    cut-leaved maple Acer negundo L. Aceraceae USA
    Manitoba maple Acer negundo L. Aceraceae Canada
    Last edited by Jim King; 02-11-2007 at 04:45 PM.

  6. #6
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    Interesting indeed. I've already seen A saccharinum under the common name "sugar maple" - definitely hard, but also "silver maple" which I know only as an ornamental species in this part of the world - and definitely soft.

    Is there a dendrologist in the house ??
    All the best,
    Ian G

    **Now holding auditions for a catchy new signature**

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim King View Post
    You are clearly not confused enough yet, try this http://www2.fpl.fs.fed.us/ and as I described above type in Maple.
    I was already sufficiently confused, thank you

    I remember that there are 13 native maple species in Canada - and probably 30 common names for them Only a handful of our species are of commercial interest.
    All the best,
    Ian G

    **Now holding auditions for a catchy new signature**

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Gillis View Post
    Interesting indeed. I've already seen A saccharinum under the common name "sugar maple" - definitely hard, but also "silver maple" which I know only as an ornamental species in this part of the world - and definitely soft.
    Okay, that was simply wrong. Sugar maple is A. saccharum and silver maple is A. saccharinum. Grade 9 latin was a looong time ago - and I only took it to be in the class with the good-looking girls

    I was hoping to find a list of species and their commercial names. I came up blank. I know I've seen such lists, but I guess they were in books.

    I did find a series of species profiles (USDA, Forest Service) which note alternate names and commercial uses of particular species.

    USDA/FS Trees commonly found in American forests - Hardwoods

    A couple of 'highlights':

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum), sometimes called hard maple or rock maple, is one of the largest and more important of the hardwoods. It grows on approximately 12.5 million hectares (31 million acres) or 9 percent of the hardwood land and has a net volume of about 130 million m3 (26 billion fbm) or 6 percent of the hardwood sawtimber volume in the United States. The greatest commercial volumes are presently in Michigan, New York, Maine, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania (53). In most regions, both the sawtimber and growing stock volumes are increasing, with increased production of saw logs,
    pulpwood, and more recently, firewood.


    Silver maple (Acer saccharinum) is a medium-sized tree of short bole and quickly branching crown common in the Eastern United States where it is also called soft maple, river maple, silverleaf maple, swamp maple, water maple, and white maple. It is found on stream banks, flood plains, and lake edges where it grows best on better-drained, moist alluvial soils. Growth is rapid in both pure and mixed stands and the tree may live 130 years or more. Silver maple is cut and sold with red maple (A. rubrum) as soft maple lumber.

    And finally from the Ohio Public Library Info Network - bless um!

    What Tree is it?

    Search by common or scientific name.

    Ain't you glad that the lumber yard doesn't label everything by species ??
    I sure am !!
    All the best,
    Ian G

    **Now holding auditions for a catchy new signature**

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Gillis View Post
    Okay, that was simply wrong. Sugar maple is A. saccharum and silver maple is A. saccharinum. Grade 9 latin was a looong time ago - and I only took it to be in the class with the good-looking girls

    Ain't you glad that the lumber yard doesn't label everything by species ??
    I sure am !!
    Now I see my mistake! Saccharum vs. saccharinum -- it's all in the 'in'. So they are two distinct species, I just can't read for comprehension any more!

    Perhaps I need more

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Hemenway View Post
    Now I see my mistake! Saccharum vs. saccharinum -- it's all in the 'in'. So they are two distinct species, I just can't read for comprehension any more!
    Take it easy on the brickwork, the mortar hasn't had time to cure yet

    It took me a while to figure it out when it was right under my nose too. This latin stuff is good for science, but it only hurts my head

    We both learned something today and that's a good thing
    All the best,
    Ian G

    **Now holding auditions for a catchy new signature**

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