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Thread: Need to do some edge jointing

  1. #1
    Chris Hatfield is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Need to do some edge jointing

    And as you guessed, no jointer.

    I want to perfectly square up the cutting boards I have been working on, and I'll definitely need to do the same to the maple boards I will be using for the kitchen table.

    I know I could use the router table and a bit, but my attempts at this so far have resulted in a notch in the first part of the board and ruined the attempt. I've got the bit as close and even with the outfeed fence as I can get it, but I still get that error. Haven't tried a sled yet, because I haven't put in a miter slot on the table yet. Got the slot, but haven't gotten around to it yet.

    The cutting boards are of all different sizes, so setting up something for repeatable results (like a straight edge) might not be the best solution. With the boards for the table, this might be a solution since they'll all be carbon copies.

    I guess what's the most efficient way to do this without spending $300 on a jointer? Should I try and set up a planer bed/jig? Make the router table sled? Looking for some ideas here, please. I'd like to get started on applying finish to the cutting boards this weekend if possible. Nothing like getting something done early for a change.

  2. #2
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    You can do it on the table saw, Here is a link as to how it's done.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    +1 on using the table saw. If you want to really make sure the corners are square, make a nice cross cut sled, and you should be good to go.

    Here's a link to a nice looking one.

    http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/a...rtablesaw.aspx

  4. #4
    Chris Hatfield is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    For the cutting boards, I'm concerned with the power of the saw - it was burning a bit when I was cutting for the boards. Doing a thin cut may not be as bad, but the concern is there.

    The greater concern is the longer boards and my lack of an outfeed table, and how the wood has been tending to flex off the back of the rip fence back into the blade. Guess I need to figure that out.

    And I've seen sleds for TS without miter slots, but I've yet to attempt it.

  5. #5
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    The tablesaw blade is the easiest, quickest, and least expensive way to your jointer.

    The router can be used, but you need a long spiral bit and a special purpose table. he table is simply long, like a jointer. The fence has a piece of plastic laminate on the out feed side, The fence is set so the bit is flush with the out feed side. The kicker here is that jointers are dead flat, so your table and fence must be dead flat with the bit perfectly perpendicular.

    Sometimes because you can do something is not reason enough to do. Get the saw blade. It is the better solution to no jointer.

  6. #6
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    Chris is you burning your Table saw blade may not be sharp enough.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
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    Chris, what tablesaw do you have?

    I had Ryobi without a miter slot and I made a sled that fit the runners to the sides of the saw top. I had a devil of a time getting square cuts with the sliding fence setup on that saw. The sled took care of that problem for me.

    Here's another vote for getting a sharp blade. You might want to check into getting a thin kerf as well. The thin kerf is supposed to help as it doesn't take quite as big a bite and doesn't require as much power for the cut.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    The thin kerf is supposed to help as it doesn't take quite as big a bite and doesn't require as much power for the cut.
    The Freud Thin Kerf Rip I think cost me $50.00
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
    Chris Hatfield is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    The blade is pretty new, but it's something I'll look at. This isn't a very powerful saw and it was hogging away at 8/4 hard maple and purpleheart. Now that I think about it, when I did trim the opposite edges I did get a much better cut with very little burning. Perhaps going from 8/4 to basically 6/4 helped the motor out. The blade is a Freud Diablo, perhaps 60T. The saw is the latest iteration of the BT3k saws, the 21829.

    The router table is equipped to do the job, but for some reason the work isn't supported for the tiniest of spaces between the bit and the outfeed fence (split fence with shims). It looks just like the NE corner of Georgia for reference. Using a 2-flute top bearing flush bit.

    Think I may go back and try the saw again, especially if I can see a much better cut on the ends I just trimmed off the other day.

  10. #10
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    Definitely make sure the cuts are square. Maybe run through the steps to square up the sliding cross cut table to the blade just for kicks. I know on mine even though the miter gauge was square to the blade, the sliding table ever so slightly would want to ride into the blade. That would push the cut into the blade and could lead to burning.

    Good luck!

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