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Thread: How to fit a door to a frame that isn't square.

  1. #1
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    How to fit a door to a frame that isn't square.

    Nov issue of Popular woodworking has an interesting Article on how to fit a door to a frame when the frame isn't square using a sharp stick. Here a Link to a free video as to how it's done.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    It seemed slow and tedious to me for fitting a door, better for scribing some really odd shape. Just my take, when I read the article.

  3. #3
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    Did ya watch the Vidio, it's 5 minutes long and thats all the time it takes.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
    yea, I read that when I got the magazine. It way to complicated and is gonna take way to long. I make all my doors 1/8" over in all dimensions and trim them to fit. I'll trim the width first and hold it in at an angle touching the sides with the hinges and make two marks equal distance from the top and use a crosscut sled with shims to cut to these marks, then lightly joint this top to remove the saw marks. Then hold the bottom in at an anlge and make marks equal distance from the bottom, cut to the marks by shiming on ts crosscut sled. Then if the door is to tall or the reveal isnt enough, take passes on the jointer which will keep any scribe and remove will remove an even amount from the edge, just be carefull of any end grain and your door should fit with a perfect reveal

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Nov issue of Popular woodworking has an interesting Article on how to fit a door to a frame when the frame isn't square using a sharp stick. Here a Link to a free video as to how it's done.
    My approach would be quite different... First find out WHY the frame is askew. then fix that. Followed by squaring the frame and then fitting the door to a square frame. Reason being.... What ever caused the frame to be out of square, will continue... over time the problem will re-occur. Fix the cause, stop the problem.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    My approach would be quite different... First find out WHY the frame is askew. then fix that. Followed by squaring the frame and then fitting the door to a square frame. Reason being.... What ever caused the frame to be out of square, will continue... over time the problem will re-occur. Fix the cause, stop the problem.

    I didn't watch the video....

    for inset doors, when I'm fitting them I usually just make the doors a bit oversized and then mark the tight corners. Take off more on that side of the edge on the edge sander and call it good.

    The truth of the matter is that while it isn't impossible to make a perfectly square door, or a perfectly square opening, it just isn't worth the time it takes to do it. Something will ALWAYS be a bit out of whack, even if it is just a small amount. Even a barely measurable amount measuring corner to corner can make a big difference visually.
    "Do, or do not. There is no try."
    -Yoda



  7. #7
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    well; I'm glad yall have your ways of doing it. I was just offering up a good solution that was presented by a major publication.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    thanks don it was interesting but everybody does what works for them. I think it could be used more to fit larger doors or countertops that you only want to move once.

  9. #9
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    It is a way to git the job done.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  10. #10
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    Interesting method Don. I may have to try it out with my cabinets that I'm starting on for the kitchen this week...Thanks!
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

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