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Thread: home for wayward turnings

  1. #1
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    home for wayward turnings

    Here's a pic I took at work with the cell. Sorry real cameras not allowed.
    I already posted the maple one, and there's a black mesquite bowl, 2 walnut cups - 1 large, 1 small: a cottonwood weedpot which was my first vessel form this summer. The really white wood with the reddish brown "splotch" was labeled hickory by the donator (Georgia) but I dont think so.
    The tiny little white lidded vessel was won at the last NM Woodturners meeting and is made of apple and apricot. It looks inlaid (but it's not) and has a threaded lid. It's probably about 1 1/2" tall, and a nickel's width. Some day I would like to have that tool control.... 1 piece at a time.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Photo-0037.jpg  

  2. #2
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    Those are some good looking turnings Michael. Keep at it and to control will come.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  3. #3
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    bethel springs TN, but was born and raised in north east PA
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    real good looking pieces ya got there. Like Bernie said keep at it and the control will get better by the day.

  4. #4
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    They all look good to me, Michael. Your tools may feel out of control, but you're still arriving at the destination in one piece. I can tell you're paying attention to your forms. That's a key thing to me. The tool control gets easier with each one. In my opinion. a good form poorly turned beats a poor form expertly turned any day of the week.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    Isn't form like beauty, in the eye of the beholder? If not, seriously Vaughn, what to you denotes good form versus "bad form"?
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Shively View Post
    Isn't form like beauty, in the eye of the beholder? If not, seriously Vaughn, what to you denotes good form versus "bad form"?
    For me I sincerely hope it's in the eye of the beholder because if it isn't some of the forms reaching rave acclaim over here just leave me cold and I must be way out of step.

    Now if it is a classical shape or form, or a minor variation of such that has stood the test of time and good taste over the centuries I'm usually appreciative of it, don't know if that's just me having been conditioned by such though.
    Chas. just a traveller on the road of time.

    Bits & Pieces Gallery
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  7. #7
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    Those are some good looking pieces Michael.

    IMHO there are some definite guidlines when it comes to desiging a pleasing turned form. For example, for a bowl or vessel a continuous curve(s) is always more pleasing than a non-continuously curved form. Human eyes like a smooth flow from the top to the bottom of the form.

    Another example is the ratio between the mouth and base of the piece. If not right, the turned piece can look really awkward.

    These are general guidlines and there are always exceptions which may appeal to some of us.

  8. #8
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    Jon, the short answer is "heck if I know".

    To a large extent "good form" is a subjective thing and different for everyone. (Much like "good music".) But as Mohammad said, there are some things that tend to be more pleasing to the human eye than others. (Here again, there are musical comparisons. Some combinations of notes sound pleasant, and others can sound harsh or disturbing.) Many of the classic forms through history have certain elements that are pleasing to most folks, so those shapes keep coming back to us in various ways and combinations.

    Smooth continuous curves and comfortable proportions are the things I look for myself, although when I'm turning something, I don't consciously take any "rules" into account. For example, I don't measure the base and try to get the "1/3 of the body" proportion that is often recommended...I just cut until I think it looks good. I still don't think I've gotten one perfect yet, and probably never will. But what's "perfect" to me might be just "OK" to some people, or "what was he thinking?" to others. Like Mohammad said, the "rules" are really just guidelines. They won't necessarily appeal to everyone's tastes.

    I agree with Chas, too. I've seen plenty of pieces get raved about that don't really float my boat. Some of John Jordan's work falls into that category for me. He's one of the grandfathers of the whole "turning as art" movement, but the proportions and lines of some of his pieces don't look all that pleasing to me. On the other hand, there are some relatively unknown turners (or potters or glass blowers) who consistently create forms that are pleasing my eyes, and I suspect to the majority of the eyes that see them.

    I also think some of the preferences people have come from their surroundings and what they're accustomed to seeing. I grew up in the Southwest, so I tend to gravitate toward some of the Native American forms. (That might explain why Michael's forms appeal to me, since he's also from that area of the world.) I've noticed many of the pieces I see my European friends turn are more along classic Roman or Greek lines. And to Stu in Tokyo, an "artsy" bowl might not appeal as much as a more utilitarian shape, since he's more accustomed to bowls being used at the eating table than the coffee table.

    So that's my two cents, but I'd be interested to see other folks' opinions.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
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    To add my buck ninty eighty to Vaughn's which is now about .12 cents...
    there are some accepted forms for different regions and styles. You will get the slam down on some forums for not adhering to this or that. I have 2 hero's that I look to for form-in-the-box-stuff...ok...maybe 5...but what do you like? Not being a fan of "The wood spoke to me" camp...think about it...turn it and see what happens!! The best thing about turning is that there is more wood, different inspiration and a shut up and turn it thing...and yup...it's an ashtray!
    Now I have to read what Vaughn said!
    Last edited by Jim Burr; 10-21-2010 at 12:25 AM.
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  10. #10
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    Cool Toto, this ain't Kansas.......

    Well this thread certainly took an unexpected and fascinating turn!
    I think this issue is at the heart of the creative endeavor matter. I see the value in emulating that which speaks to you - And I take every piece I attempt very seriously, but only in the sense that I won't BS myself! That is how I grow into my vision.
    I'm going to spare you the rant I have against the art police and those that attempt to should all over me. I do it for fun. I do it for me, even if Im making it for you.
    Im not in it for $, Im not in it for glory, and Im not in it for your admiration. It's a creative means to an end, which never ends..... to quote bob dylan "aint got nuthin, got nothin to lose."
    Rock on turners!

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