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Thread: Shellac / glaze on pine

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN
    Posts
    8

    Shellac / glaze on pine

    I built a "hay rake" table out of dimentional lumber and old pallet material (soft pine.) (I'm working on pix to add as requested in another thread. Just haven't gotten them done yet. ,, I'm told you all like to see lots of pix.) It was a project that was intended to be just for the practice of it and to see if I could do it. Lot's of M'nT joints, wedged tennons, breadboard ends, etc. Lot's of stuff I haven't attampted before. Well it's actually turned out pretty well, and I think it's a usuable table, so it may be spared from the firepit.

    Now I'm wondering about a finish. I think I've read somewhere, sometime, about using shellac layered with glaze (gel stain) to add some depth and color to the finish. Anyone ever heard of that? tried that? I'm afraid of the splotching because it's cheap, soft pine. Any other suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,076
    Congrats on the build. On blotch-prone woods, many use a very thin dewaxed shellac as a sealer. This helps even out the color between the soft and hard(er) parts of some woods. I use Zinsser's "Seal Coat" which is the trade name of their clear dewaxed shellac. It is a 2lb cut out of the can so I hit that 50:50 with denatured alcohol when using it as a sealer.

    As in ALL finishing scenarios, test-pieces, test-pieces, test-pieces. Take a piece of your stock and prepare the surface exactly as you have prepared the surface of your piece. Try variations of the finish you want to use. If you are diligent and record your mixtures and sequences carefully, you can predict exactly how your finish will come out.

    My sequence on your material might go something like this, assuming the test board is already prepared as the actual piece:

    - wipe on sealer
    - wait about 20 minutes
    - touch sand if required
    - add colorant (stain, dye, whatever) . . . or not
    - let dry
    - topcoat with 2lb cut shellac
    - let dry
    - glaze for effect
    - top coat with your choice (this will vary depending on the intended use).

    Have fun.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Congrats on the build, we look forward to seeing pics

    I agree with Glenn on the seal coat, works really well with pine!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN
    Posts
    8

    Pictures

    Finally got around to taking some pix. I still haven't put on a finish yet. I haven't come up with a good plan......
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hay Rake parts R.jpg   Hay Rake base 2R.jpg   Hay Rake Brdbd ends R.jpg   Hay Rake fastenedR.jpg   Hay Rake table 2R.jpg  


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,172
    Very nice. I really like the base. Gonna have to bookmark this one!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    Very Nice Scott. I like the design and I think that the finish routine that Glenn described will work well for you don't darken it to much and use a stain that will compliment that rustic look. BTW what are the dimensions of the table.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,443
    That's a great looking table Scott.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Outside the beltway
    Posts
    5,255
    Nice table Scott!
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,472
    another vote on a great design and great looks..i wouldnt darken it to much. its looks real good with aged looking top just bring the legs into match the top in color..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Worth the wait for the pictures, wow, you have done some really nice work there
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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