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Thread: Handling logs

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Courtenay/Comox Valley, British Columbia
    Posts
    3,220

    Handling logs

    I've read a number of threads about some of you bringing home these big logs for your projects. I don't understand how you manage handling these giant pieces, obviously too heavy to lift.

    I'm not even going to ask how you got it *on* the truck. I can imagine how you got it *off* the truck. But how did you manage to get it to the bandsaw? Get it onto the bandsaw table? Do you all have portable sawmills in your yards? I'm assuming you're not cutting it up in 1' pieces.....So how in the world do you do this?

    Thanks,
    cynthia
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
    AKA The Rookie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia
    Posts
    5,011
    Cynthia..I use my chainsaw to break down the big logs into manageable pieces and a hydraulic cart to raise the heavy ones up to the bandsaw. If making lumber there are limits to what size you can handle. I've done some 14" x 5' apple on my Laguna 24" bandsaw, but that's as big as I want to get.. If making turning blanks it gets much easier.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,170
    Thought you were preparing for flat working - furniture and such, not turning.

    Would you not be working in hardwoods, as opposed to your native evergreens? Or do you have access to logs of hardwoods?

    I have acquired logs - and someone with a Woodmiser! Usually I just buy rough sawn hardwood and good plywood and go from there.

    I admire your enthusiasm, friend, but even we girls can't do everything at once!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Southern, Illinois
    Posts
    106
    Before I got a small mill, I used one of those chainsaw mills. They are nothing but work....but they really do work. To move the logs around I usually use a cant hook and cuss a bunch Then I bought a 70 HP kubota tractor and put pallet forks on it

    Here is a guy that is selling those chainsaw mills on ebay. I sent him the picture after I cut my first log. It was a red oak. You can see my old toyota in the background.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Chain-Saw-Chains...#ht_1633wt_906

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Nova Scotia, 45N 64W
    Posts
    1,245
    That's what hydraulics and diesel engines were invented for

    Much of my hardwood has been rescued from tree removals, utilites, etc in the local area and one of the fringe benefits of being a regular customer at the local building supply is you can sometimes hire their boom truck for an hour. There are a couple of very good Woodmizer sawyers close by too.

    Keep an eye out for tree work within the community. I heard not long ago that the City of Victoria was embarking on some major tree removals (and I assume, major re-planting for the future). You have to be quick though, there's nothing sadder than a mighty oak all junked-up into 16" firewood.

    Happy looging!
    Peter
    Last edited by Peter Rideout; 11-07-2010 at 09:36 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Courtenay/Comox Valley, British Columbia
    Posts
    3,220
    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Reed View Post
    Thought you were preparing for flat working - furniture and such, not turning.

    Would you not be working in hardwoods, as opposed to your native evergreens? Or do you have access to logs of hardwoods?

    I have acquired logs - and someone with a Woodmiser! Usually I just buy rough sawn hardwood and good plywood and go from there.

    I admire your enthusiasm, friend, but even we girls can't do everything at once!
    Carol, this has nothing to do with turning, and I'm not taking up turning. I'm just asking how people manage with big logs. It seems that plenty of people, when they have the opportunity, bring home a big log. I just want to know how they move it around and get it into manageable pieces.

    Thanks for all the replies. That's very interesting.
    Cynthia
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
    AKA The Rookie

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Westphalia, Michigan
    Posts
    955
    Cynthia, I've done it several ways. The best way is with heavy equipment. I am fortunate to have access to skid steers, a back hoe, tractors, and a pay loader. I have also winched them onto a trailer. Some of the jumbo sized logs got quartered on site and then winched or lifted onto a trailer.

    I have also chainsaw milled some in place. Last year I had to chainsaw mill a 30" plus X 19 ft. beech log. We took off 3, 6/4 planks before the backhoe could lift the log. The remaining log was cut 6/4 on a Woodmizer lt 40 super for a customer. One plank is in an Architectural firms office as a table.

    I cut a lot of pen blanks and other turning woods. Most of these come out of short blocks that get culled from the firewood pile. I usually cut these in half and then bandsaw the halves into whatever the figured wood grain allows.

    If you have a decent band saw you might check with a local sawmill. You can sometimes buy butt log cut-offs. My local mill deals in a lot of veneer and figured woods so those butt pieces can make premium turning stock
    I'm a certifiable tree hugger. (it's a poor mans way of determining DBH before cutting the tree down)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,008
    I don't collect long logs, but I like to find large diameter trunk (or stump) sections that I can cut up with a chainsaw into turning blanks. I have a Tommy gate on my pickup that'll lift 1000 pounds, so if I can roll it onto the gate, I can get it home.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Salt Spring Island, BC Canada
    Posts
    2,070
    Hey that is what glassman is for. Geezzz do we have to tell ya everything.
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Salt Spring Island, BC Canada
    Posts
    2,070
    I picked up a small trailer that I can roll small logs onto it. Chain saw and peavy helps too.
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

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