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Thread: Going ons here in NWI

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
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    6,098

    Going ons here in NWI

    Been busy around, 11-2 besides voting had to load the six yearlings for their one way ride. Had the wild heifer actually jump out of the trailer and clear me over my head while I was standing upright. Ended up seeing a nice bruise on my right forearm today, she clipped my hat as she went over me. All in all, about 45 minutes and they were on the trailer. Wildest bunch of calves I have ever raised. Due to the bull I rented. Going to try to eliminate that with this next bunch by feeding them as weanlings in a barn so they get more one on one contact with me. Water pump is leaking very bad on the Oliver (only loader tractor on my farm) and I move a round bale a week right now so it isn't convenient for it to be down. I hope I don't have to take off all of the tins and radiator. Looking like the weather will cooperate for the early part of this coming week so that is when I will start tearing it down. In anticipation of waiting on parts (Olivers aren't real common anymore) I bought a tumblebug. For those of you not acquainted with this unique piece of equipment here is a video of one in action.

    http://www.ccmachinery.com/public_ht...0Bug%20014.mov

    The tumblebug in the picture of course is new (price not in my checkbook) and new they cost over $1,400.00! I saw this one in the local machinery sale yard, called the guy, he said it will need some work and tires, $150.00. I bought it. Drug it to the school shop (literally as the brakes are frozen) thankfully the tires were already shot and the roads were wet with snow. Will have the boys drag it in Tuesday, we will do a lesson on pulling wheels, breaking hubs loose from frozen brakes, redoing brakes as well as packing bearings. Hope to have it running before the tractor is. Either way, it gives me options. If I get my team of horses broke, can even haul hay easily with them using this. As you can see from the video, the brakes are essential to the rig working properly. Did some sluething thanks to Southwood, will have to get pictures of that deal and post at a later date. Just a tease to keep you checking back though!!!!
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
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    12,251
    Thanks Jonathan. Man thats a neat trailer. Always wondered how the guys collected those rolls. How does it come off again? You just unhook the trailer and tip it out?

    Good deal on the trailer you picked up. Boys will learn a lot. I made my son pack our little luggage trailers bearings with grease just to make him understand how to get his hands dirty and that these things need doing. Will do it again in the late spring.
    cheers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
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    Watch the whole video Rob. I found it especially for you knowing how you like the inner workings of equipment. Notice the guy can load and unload without leaving the seat of the truck. Now this isn't a fast way to move hay, but is quite effective without the use of hydraulics and actually can be pulled down the road. See a lot of trucks with the sides broken and bent out at the top from guys loading round bales and hauling one home for a few horses or critters. The pressure gets stronger with each bounce. Actually for moving hay home, I use my 24' flat gooseneck trailer, my hay guy loads me in the field and I unload myself at home with the Oliver. This gives me the opportunity to use my pickup or the team once broke to drive a cart in the event the loader tractor won't start. Actually thinking it will be better anyway after the ground is frozen as the bales I bought range in weight from 1400-1800 pounds each. Bouncing across ruts and frozen fields is hard on the loader and tractor with that much hanging off of the front of it.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  4. #4
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    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
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    Wow that heavy hey. I did watch the whole video 3 times. Did not see him off load. But will look on you tube for a few.

    check this machine out

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elYZs...0076C9A85E1F2F
    Last edited by Rob Keeble; 11-07-2010 at 04:23 AM.
    cheers

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
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    My fault Rob, sorry. To unload, I am going to put a latch on the tongue (don't know if there was one originally) so the spear doesn't go around the bale as it folds up. Set the brakes on the tires, back up and without the spear falling, the bale will roll off of the carrier. For road transport a person would want at least one ratchet strap over the bale holding it on.
    Yep, that heavy, can get them lighter, but then I have to handle more weekly. Sorry about the confusion.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
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    That ain't the way my uncle bob had us bucking hay when I was kid.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
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    I do have a loose hay loader for loading wagons. That is another one of those, "one of these days projects". It is in working order and all there and always shedded, just takes a top notch farm team because when turning corners if they see that tall monster behind the wagon and it is moving and throwing hay, even good teams have been know to run away.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
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    Jonathan how long would a bale like that last for how many heads of cattle or cows?

    If you had to buy one like that what would it set you back.

    Just strikes me now that with all the gas involved producing hay is a costly excercise. Then the wrapping man i been looking at you tube videos and how much does that add?

    I am thinking is cattle grade corn cheaper

    Man i think there is a farmer in me wanting to bust out. Think they would take a 52 year old at agri school. I mean Steve gone off to do Electrics heck why can i not go learn farming. The economics become a serious issue from what i see. Is diesel cheaper in the states than normal gas? Do farmers get cheaper umm subsidized gas at all?

    Anyone making propane or natural gas farming equipment like the forlifts i have seen? Very interesting once one starts to think about the whole chain.
    cheers

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
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    Rob, Don't really know the answers to your question but w e do grow a lot of aphapha hay around here and I see signs all the time that offer hey for $7 a bale is that give you any idea. around here farmers can get bout 4-6 crop per year.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
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    6,098
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Jonathan how long would a bale like that last for how many heads of cattle or cows?

    I make my cows "clean up the hay" so I get an extra day and with my six cows and their calves and the bull right now I get about 8 days to a bale. Once the temp drops, they get warmth from eating and their stomach/bowels working so they eat more and I get around five days. Once I wean the calves and get them in a seperate pen, it extends a couple more days but then have another bale in another pasture.

    If you had to buy one like that what would it set you back.

    With current hay prices, 140-200 dollars a ton, I bought these for 40 dollars each. My hay guy is local, he realizes he has to haul at least 90 miles to get to a hay sale, has to pay commission and takes the risk of an auction. Kind of a bird in the hand situation. I even got luckier as I was available to haul when he was done baling and wanted to get them off of the field so he loaded my trailer and his and didn't charge me a hauling fee. His real profit margin is in small square bales to hobby/horse farms. So many times the hay gets round baled if it got some rain on it, got a little mature, or he needed to "catch up" so dropped a lot of acres and baled to get the next growth started. I am providing him an opportunity to locally liquidate that lesser quality hay. This I don't feed to my horses as they are more fragile internally and the molds besides causing colic can really mess up their respitory system. Thus the difference in price from horse hay to cow hay.

    Just strikes me now that with all the gas involved producing hay is a costly excercise. Then the wrapping man i been looking at you tube videos and how much does that add?

    Extremely expensive, look at the cost of a good baler, powerful enough tractor, haybine, hay rake/tedder and the tractor. Also looking at least three trips in the field generally four trips, 1-mowing, 2-raking, 3-baling, 4-moving bales from the field. I am not buying wrapped bales as his baler is a twine machine. But that does add to the cost but also protects that outside layer. Many people say, it is only deteriorated 2-4 inches in. I am not an engineer/mathmatician, but the outside circumference of a round bale ruined 2-4 inches around is a large proportion of that bale of hay! My dad only bought small square bales and only bought by the bale. He is a highly intelligent man, but could never convince him to buy hay by the weight.

    I am thinking is cattle grade corn cheaper

    Nope, last ton of feed went from $3.30 a bushel to $5.50 a bushel.

    Man i think there is a farmer in me wanting to bust out. Think they would take a 52 year old at agri school. I mean Steve gone off to do Electrics heck why can i not go learn farming. The economics become a serious issue from what i see. Is diesel cheaper in the states than normal gas? Do farmers get cheaper umm subsidized gas at all?

    Ag schools across the country will gladly take your money and explain how to farm/raise livestock out of a book in an air conditioned/heated classroom. The real education is hiring on with a local farmer as a hired hand, then the real economics will come into play. Diesel gives more work per gallon, gas tractors for me are easier to work on and start in my unheated machine shed regardless the temp.. Diesel fuel for farm use is not taxed for excise (roads) so is dyed another color. Department of Transportation officers are known to go to farm auctions, sale barns and other gathering places and using a litmus paper, swab the fuel neck of farmers diesel pickups. Anyone found using the non taxed fuel are fined heavily.

    Anyone making propane or natural gas farming equipment like the forlifts i have seen? Very interesting once one starts to think about the whole chain.
    Propane tractors are harder to work on, harder to fuel, do get better mileage, they were more popular in the 50-60's when tractor manufacturers were still trying to decide what was going to be most popular, diesel, propane, or gas. Good questions. Neighboring farm is for sale, 31 acres, house and 50x80 pole barn. House has attached two car garage. Some woods, tillable acres, deer, rabbit, turkey and the occassional goose and duck on it. Could run my cows on your corn stubble after harvest. Hmmmmm, then I would be your North Neighbor!!!!!
    Last edited by Jonathan Shively; 11-07-2010 at 12:18 PM.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

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