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Thread: kitchen plan

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
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    kitchen plan

    Well,
    the LOML and I trundled off to Lowes tonight, and I let the design gal help Lori with coming up with a new floorplan for our kitchen. see attached (I'm on the laptop, no sketchup allowed, so Paint is the best I could do).

    We're going to get other quotes, as even the basic cabinets at Lowes were $3000 or so. Without new appliances or counter tops... (we're only thinking of a new stove and adding a dishwasher, we'll re-use our current fridge.




    On both setups, there is the island I built last summer in the center, the new plan also allows a typical kitchen table in the largish open space. I just didn't draw it or the island.

    We're switching to a single sink, moving the sink to the inside wet wall, and adding the dishwasher.

    Not to scale by any means.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails kitchen As is.JPG   kitchen plan.JPG  
    -Ned

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
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    Ned,
    I have a question. If you are going to sell the place and move why are you spending money on remodeling it. Just doesn't make sense to me
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    Don,
    honestly, the kitchen as it sits is pretty well the worst part of the house, and two of my lodge brothers who are realtors suggested that we invest some money into it, or the price on the house might fetch is going to be much lower than we would like, even in this economy.

    We're not going overboard, Just 'enough' to keep with the nature of the house (small, starter home). It is the largest project on our plate, along with new laminate flooring throughout the public areas, and basic carpet or other laminate in the bedrooms.

    the punch list is
    Kitchen
    paint/trim
    Flooring
    -Ned

  4. #4
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    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    Don,
    honestly, the kitchen as it sits is pretty well the worst part of the house, and two of my lodge brothers who are realtors suggested that we invest some money into it, or the price on the house might fetch is going to be much lower than we would like, even in this economy...
    Be careful what you spend there. Realtors love to talk about things like "90% return on investment" and things like that, but remember that a 90% ROA is still a 10% LOSS.

    Yeah, you'll get a better price if you upgrade, but you won't get all your costs back. It might be better to do some less expensive cosmetics, and let the buyer put his/her own money into doing the major rebuilds to their own tastes.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Kansas City, Missouri
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    Are the two attachments new options? What is the layout now?

    The second attachment layout works better to me than the first, your work triangle (stove, fridge, sink) isn't perfect on either, but that one seems to have a better flow.

    I have to agree with Jim though (not seeing pics of what you're working with), you may still take a loss just to make the realtors job easier.

    Clean and well kept will sell just as well as new and fresh if it looks like they have very little to do.

    Some suggestions:

    Appliance you have that are missing parts or need new seals can be replaced very inexpensively and easily to make an appliance appear well kept (http://www.repairclinic.com is one of my favs).

    Re-use any cabinetry by relocating and only buying/building new where you have to, possibly reface or paint and install new hardware.

    Use fresh and inexpensive laminate counter tops to freshen the look and update colors.

    Faucets are cheap to replace.

    Replace older receptacles/light switches and face plates for a cleaner/updated look.

    Don't personalize, use neutral colors.

    Replace trim work or strip and clean up woodwork that has too many layers of paint. Caulk and paint all gaps, no matter how small, this may be picky, but makes for a much cleaner look.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Wright View Post
    Are the two attachments new options? What is the layout now?

    The second attachment layout works better to me than the first, your work triangle (stove, fridge, sink) isn't perfect on either, but that one seems to have a better flow.

    I have to agree with Jim though (not seeing pics of what you're working with), you may still take a loss just to make the realtors job easier.




    Some suggestions:

    Appliance you have that are missing parts or need new seals can be replaced very inexpensively and easily to make an appliance appear well kept (http://www.repairclinic.com is one of my favs).

    Re-use any cabinetry by relocating and only buying/building new where you have to, possibly reface or paint and install new hardware.

    Use fresh and inexpensive laminate counter tops to freshen the look and update colors.

    Faucets are cheap to replace.

    Replace older receptacles/light switches and face plates for a cleaner/updated look.

    Don't personalize, use neutral colors.

    Replace trim work or strip and clean up woodwork that has too many layers of paint. Caulk and paint all gaps, no matter how small, this may be picky, but makes for a much cleaner look.

    My thoughts exactly.

    Realtors are interested in making a sale the easiest way possible. No matter what they say they have their own interests at heart.

    As long as everything is clean, neat, freshly painted, furniture placed so it's pleasing to the eye, and appliances are fairly modern looking and in good working condition you shouldn't have a problem selling it.

    If a floor needs finishing, a rug replaced or a new stove or similar, you can offer the buyer a thousand or so dollars back at closing to take care of those issues. If your house is a starter, the type of buyer thats interested is not going to have a ton of extra cash kicking around. They will be willing to get a mortgage closer to the asking price in order to get unexpected cash back to fix a few things.
    Clean and well kept will sell just as well as new and fresh if it looks like they have very little to do.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Reno NV
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    Be careful what you spend there. Realtors love to talk about things like "90% return on investment" and things like that, but remember that a 90% ROA is still a 10% LOSS.

    Yeah, you'll get a better price if you upgrade, but you won't get all your costs back. It might be better to do some less expensive cosmetics, and let the buyer put his/her own money into doing the major rebuilds to their own tastes.
    +1 on what Jim said. Unless you really, really want to do it, it might be easier to let the new owners do what they want...

  8. #8
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    May 2007
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    Another thing to consider, cosmetic changes don't typically wont require permits. A large renovation that requires electrical and plumbing to be moved will, which also adds $$$s. Though you can do the work yourself, just be prepared to back up the disclosures, as they always ask if permits were pulled if it's obvious that something major has changed.

    Also, Bob's advice to just give an allowance at closing is a good idea, have done that with paint and flooring on one house we sold, but I'd only suggest this when negotiating or if you're in competition with new housing where you have to be competitive with those sales.
    Last edited by Darren Wright; 11-10-2010 at 04:26 PM.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  9. #9
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    I agree with others have said on the last 2 houses I sold (my mothers when she passed away and the house we sold before moving here) I painted the insides of the houses a very neutral soft white but did nothing else. In both instances the carpeting needed replacing. I got and estimate as to the cost of new carpeting and offered the buyer half that amount as a rebate ate the close of escrow. I told thew agent that was so the new buyer could put any color of carpeting they wanted rather then having to live with what I picked out. It actually made the hose easier to sell.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gibson View Post
    ...Realtors are interested in making a sale the easiest way possible. No matter what they say they have their own interests at heart...
    This bears repeating. Any improvement you make to the property -- regardless of its cost -- translates into more money for the real estate agent. Not only is the sale easier, but the commission is bigger. I realize these are your Lodge brothers and not out to take advantage of you, but I suspect they're conditioned into thinking this way.

    Extreme example...say you spend $50K upgrading the house, but it only results in increasing the selling price by $1000. The Realtor doesn't care, since he's still getting a bigger commission than he would had you not done the upgrades. There are some relatively low-cost cosmetic expenses that are worth the money, like a fresh coat of paint or new switches and receptacles, or even flooring if the existing stuff is worn out, but I don't think I'd be installing any cabinets.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

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