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Thread: vertical panel raiser tearout question

  1. #1
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    vertical panel raiser tearout question

    Im playing around with dovetail boxes today and wanted to raise some small panels for lids.None are for anything other than a bit of practice making accurate dovetails and floating panels. I went slow, tried different router speeds, moved the bit and fence in small increments to take small bites at first, then move them closer or higher, or both together, nothing seems to work.Is there anyway to control this? The bit is fairly new and good quality.

    BTW-I love my new router/tablesaw combo. The flow is easy and its a simple task taking out bits, raising the router, etc.(and I use the tablesaw without moving everything.Im not thrilled with a collet adaptor, I dont know why, but Id prefer the new 1/4 collet for the smaller bits)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bed 013 (Medium).jpg  

  2. #2
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    Two options come to mind Allen

    1) score the edge with a knife first

    or

    2) use a sacrificial two piece fence and move it into your blade to create a zero clearance area around the blade from the right and left sides.

    An example of the fence: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJ6u9YH1fBI
    Last edited by Darren Wright; 11-23-2010 at 10:01 PM.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  3. #3
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    Another option is to run the four panel defining cuts on the table saw. This gives you a very clean kerf. You then set the raised-panel bit to stop just shy of the clean shoulder.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails raise-panel-prep.jpg   raise-panel-prep-2.jpg  
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 11-23-2010 at 10:40 PM.
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  4. #4
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    Ooh, neat trick. I'll have to remember that Glenn.

  5. #5
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    .,.,.,
    Last edited by John Bartley; 11-27-2010 at 01:16 PM.

  6. #6
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    I am not sure about how to get a clean cut but I am concerned about a safety issue. It looks like you are running the board against the fence with the router bit on the outside. I was always told that was basically a climb cut and has a high potential to kick back. If I am wrong I hope someone here will correct me but that has always been my practice and training.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Connor View Post
    If I am wrong I hope someone here will correct me but that has always been my practice and training.
    Not wrong in my book. I assumed that the fence position was random and just happened to be like that when the pic was taken. A captured cut of that type is a shortcut to the emergency room IMHO. John makes a good point about the design of those vertical bits. Right where you want the cleanest cut is their weakest performance area. Similar discussions have revolved around v-groove bits.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  8. #8
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    I had the same thought as Ralph. It looks like you're running the workpiece between the fence and the bit, and in my experience that's a recipe for a board launcher. I always have the bit sticking out from the edge of the fence in such a way that no more than 1/2 of the bit is exposed, and the workpiece runs over just the exposed part of the bit. That's why router table fences have the gap in the middle.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  9. #9
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    yeah, after having no luck with running the board face in, I tried a few cuts running it face towards me,I wanted to see the bit and if it was catching or maybe I was tilting it and it was catching. with no luck ofcourse.
    I ran a piece of white oak before, without any cuts first, and it seemed to run through easy enough.
    I keep cutting down 11 inch pieces of spanish cedar from one board, so maybe theres just a defect in the board. doesnt look like it, its a perfectly flat and blemish free board.
    I have a regular panel raiser bit, but its actually too wide for the router opening on the aluminum insert. Not the plastic insert, the entire router opening, so I cant use it on this table.(Im thinkin its just time to buy a regular panel raising bit, a bit smaller so it fits)
    Ive run a few raised panels with the vertical bit, havent had problems, but they were bigger, easier to manage, and a harder wood.
    With a board only 7x11 inches, its hard to get a decent grip(for me at least) using the vertical bit.


    I looked up and looked over some articles, and there was one where Beth(woodshopdemos) attached a higher fence and then put a featherboard higher than the bit top to secure the board. Looks like a good idea, so I think Ill give it a shot.
    Make an auxillary fence higher, zero clearance the bit and the mount a feather board on a 2x4 that can be secured to the mitre track.
    Last edited by allen levine; 11-24-2010 at 02:43 AM.

  10. #10
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    Well this post sure is a good learning experience. Reinforcement again of the basic principle of zero clearance support. Now who needs a magazine to tell one that when you can get it from your buddies here.
    cheers

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