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Thread: a sheetrock question

  1. #1
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    a sheetrock question

    When I was young....a long-long time ago.....I recall there were two different kinds of interior wall material.
    One was drywall.
    The other was called sheetrock. It was unlike drywall in that it was thinner and was a solid material rather than compacted. It really resembled a sheet of rock.
    I don't know why one would be used in one application over the other. I do recall it was hard to work with and, as a skinny little kid, I couldn't lift a sheet alone.
    Is what I remember as 'sheetrock' still used? Or is drywall now sometimes referred to as sheetrock?
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    When I was young....a long-long time ago.....I recall there were two different kinds of interior wall material.
    One was drywall.
    The other was called sheetrock. It was unlike drywall in that it was thinner and was a solid material rather than compacted. It really resembled a sheet of rock.
    I don't know why one would be used in one application over the other. I do recall it was hard to work with and, as a skinny little kid, I couldn't lift a sheet alone.
    Is what I remember as 'sheetrock' still used? Or is drywall now sometimes referred to as sheetrock?
    I've always heard sheetrock referred to as drywall myself. I did drywall for about 6 years professionally, but didn't use much of anything else. Was it more like the concrete backer board that is being used? What was the texture like? Smooth or rough? I know before my time that they had other types of backers for plaster that replaced the laths.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Wright View Post
    I've always heard sheetrock referred to as drywall myself. I did drywall for about 6 years professionally, but didn't use much of anything else. Was it more like the concrete backer board that is being used? What was the texture like? Smooth or rough? I know before my time that they had other types of backers for plaster that replaced the laths.
    It was (is?) smooth and thinner than most drywalls.
    I don't know what the concrete backer board is.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  4. #4
    Chris Hatfield is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    What a fantastic question. I've always used the two interchangeably.

    Apparently, after a quick search, Sheetrock is a trademark of USG. So I suppose sheetrock = drywall these days.

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    May have been meant to go over wood laths to patch plaster to match to the 3/4" depth, but used it as the main wallboard instead. I've read on a couple of sites about the type you are describing, seemed to be common in the 50's. Hard telling though, USG has been making sheetrock for a long time, patents back to 1912.

    http://preservationinpink.files.word.../img_09722.jpg
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  6. #6
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    Guess you could tear down a wall and see if there's a label on the back.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  7. #7
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    We had a material that would resemble that,it was asbestos mixed with concrete and compressed into sheets of about different thicknesses.

    That same material was used for making sewage pipes and ondulate sheets for roofing.

    When asbestos was found to be hazardous and banned they stopped producing it.

    Now when renewing a building that has that material specialized companies have to take care of the removal of it.

    Its brand name was Uralita
    Best regards,
    Toni

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Wright View Post
    May have been meant to go over wood laths to patch plaster to match to the 3/4" depth, but used it as the main wallboard instead. I've read on a couple of sites about the type you are describing, seemed to be common in the 50's. Hard telling though, USG has been making sheetrock for a long time, patents back to 1912.

    http://preservationinpink.files.word.../img_09722.jpg
    My reccolection is use on new construction. And, yes, this was back in the 50's.
    Later post, Toni may be right about it being asbetos. Dunno.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    My reccolection is use on new construction. And, yes, this was back in the 50's.
    Later post, Toni may be right about it being asbetos. Dunno.
    If I remember right, asbestos was used in drywall to strengthen it all the way up to about 1980, so there's a potential that even housed built up to then may have it in the drywall.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  10. #10
    There was also one that I recall from the 50's and early 60's that we called plasterboard. It was different in both size and the paper texture. The stuff was delivered in a bundle, 4 ft long and 16" wide, 6 to a bundle. It really was intended to plaster on. The paper was a great deal rougher than sheetrock. I haven't seen it for 50 years or so (can't even believe I'm old enough to say that I remember something 50 years ago)

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