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Thread: Face Frame with applied bead

  1. #1
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    Face Frame with applied bead

    I have some cabinets to build that will require me adding an applied bead to the face frame. I have heard it called "cock beading" before. I was wondering what is a good size for this bead? I was thinking 1/4" x frame thickness. Is this enough to give me a good sized bead, or should I go with 3/8" instead?

    thanks in advance
    chris

  2. #2
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    chris, it all depends on the piece you`re working with...here`s a pic of 1/4" on 2" stock.....tod

    Attachment 437
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
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    thanks tod

    do you have a preferred method of making the bead?

    i was thinking i could either rip some 1/4" strips and rout each side with a roundover, but i'm not sure i could get a good consistency this way. also thinking of safety here!!

    i also thought of using a 1/4" edge beading bit to put a bead on both sides of let's say a 2" board. then rip both sides off giving me the bead i need.

    any other ideas would be appreciated.

    thanks so much
    chris

  4. #4
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    chris, i resaw 2-3" boards on the bandsaw then plane `em down to final thickness. i use a shaper and feeder for consistant results but a router table with featherboards and a beading bit will also give good results, just be sure to have good chip extraction in place and try to feed at a steady rate. hitting both sides with a 1/4 round bit has never given me good results...tod
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  5. #5
    Chris, I've made some tables with cock beading and I think you achieve the better result by edge beading the stock first, and then ripping the edge- beaded portion off rather than using the round-over bit on a 1/4" wide stock.
    An 1/8" radius edge beading bit will produce a perfect 1/4" 18o degree finished bead (when run to full profile depth) with no flat spots on the profile, and you can choose to widen the reveal a little with a simple pass through the table saw if you wish, then rip it off the board.
    With the round-over bit you would need to use a 1/8" radius bit to achieve a perfect 1/4" 180 degree round over and would be working with a piece of 1/4" wide stock to make a least 1 pass through the router table. To me, this is slower, causes extra set-up time, may not be as consistent shape-wise and maybe not as safe routing narrow stock.
    Rick.

  6. #6
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    thanks rick

    i am thinking i will take the route you described as i had already thought of doing it this way and i don't have the set up to do the method tod mentioned...no shaper, no power feeder, no bandsaw.....starting to feel inadequate here....anyway, for me and my situation, this will be the best method.

    hopefully if things go the way i want them to, i won't be feeling inadequate anymore when it comes to tools.

    thanks again for the help guys

    chris

  7. #7
    Chris, I don't have either the TOOLS, EXPERTISE or SKILLS that Tod has. What I do have is a bunch of cock beads that I made with the 1/4 round-over that aren't good for much other than firewood, so there you have it. The other benefit is that if you like to build furniture and don't have a beading bit, it's a pretty useful one for adding a small embelishment to a table apron or backboards in a cabinet etc.. that little detail kind of helps lift the ordinary into a nicer piece.
    Here's a link to show you some examples and common sizes with prices etc fyi.....http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...168,46184&ap=1

    Hope it works out well for you.
    btw.. will we be seing pics of the finished project?

  8. #8
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    I guess a hand plane is out?

    What is it, a Stanely #45 or #50, (I'll go look) that can be set up for this....?

    Just a thought.....

  9. #9
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    I use what are called side bead planes and then rip it off, unless I miter in the intersections.



    You can use any of the plow planes which do beading, the 45/55 being some, as well as the simpler 50. In my case, the Record version, the 050. But the dedicated woodies are faster and less fussy.

    Take care, Mike
    Wenzloff & Sons Sawmakers

  10. #10
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    Hope it works out well for you.
    btw.. will we be seing pics of the finished project?
    Rick,

    Stay tuned, i plan to start somewhat of a journal for this project. I went and got some of the wood yesterday evening. thanks for the help. I have a 1/8" beading bit now. i will give it a shot with this bit and see how I like the results.


    thanks
    chris

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