Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Nailer question

  1. #1
    Chris Hatfield is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    380

    Nailer question

    My wife wants a wish list, and I'm filling some rather extravagant wants here. I mean, surely a mortise machine can fit into a stocking, right?

    But actually I was looking at the three pack of nailers from Harbor Freight that's on sale for $50 this month with coupon. I'm not really looking for opinions on that particular set, but you're welcome to give them.

    I've been borrowing a nailer from someone that came in a set, and I'm not getting great results from it. The hole the brad makes is elongated horizontally. They are 18-ga brads used in a Husky 2n1 nailer/stapler. I'm pretty sure I'm using the right nail in the nailer, so I don't think that's the problem. Is that how it normally works, and for anything where I don't want holes to show use a pin nailer, or is something wrong somewhere in the process?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,433
    How wide of hole is the 18 gauge making? Head width or much wider? I don't have a HF nailer, but my senco has a pretty narrow driver, which also has a dial to set the depth. The driver is barely wider than the head, but 18 gauge holes are pretty visible from what I've seen.

    I do have the HF stapler and have been very happy with it, mostly use it for shooting underlayment down or backs on to cabinets. Don't have the pin nailer, but have one on my wish list. I think you've got the right idea for when to use it. The pin doesn't do a lot but hold the piece til the glue sets up and is pretty invisible.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,356
    I picked up the 23 gauge pin nailer a little while ago. It seemed to work pretty well when I was putting down some carpet reducer molding last weekend. Went right through the maple no problem, and was darn near invisible. Too bad the pins just weren't strong enough for what I wanted them to do.

    Went back to the 18 gauge bostich finish nailer. The 18 gauge does make a bit of a dimple that would need to be filled in though.

  4. #4
    After much advice from other forum members, I went with the Bostich set. I have nothing but about all 3 pieces.

    http://www.amazon.com/Factory-Recond...396186&sr=1-14

    Obviously, It came with a compressor, but the guns have handled everything I have thrown at them.

    Good Luck

  5. #5
    Chris Hatfield is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    380
    I'll have to take a picture of it, but the hole is as wide as the head on one plane, and 2-3 times as wide on another. Almost like the nail is going in at an angle and not straight-on.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,433
    Any way to adjust the set depth? If so, set it to where the nail head is flush, then use a nail set to drive it below the surface. Sounds like because it is the 2 in 1 the driver is as wide as a staple (1/4"). A dedicated 18 gauge nailer shouldn't' have that issue. If you do get a dedicated nailer, I'd suggest the 2" 18 gauge over the 1 1/4" version. I mostly use 1 1/2" to 2" nails most of the time. I gave away my PC 1 1/4" version to my nephew.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,356
    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Wright View Post
    If you do get a dedicated nailer, I'd suggest the 2" 18 gauge over the 1 1/4" version. I mostly use 1 1/2" to 2" nails most of the time. I gave away my PC 1 1/4" version to my nephew.
    +1 on the 2" versus 1 1/4".

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,600
    Something wrong Chris. I suspect wrong nails or improper loading. Try a shorter nail and see if it happens. May be that the nail is too long or the wood is too tough and the head is bending over just under the top of the wood.
    Also, try shooting through a small piece of cardboard or thin plastic into the wood to see if the marks are still there. Could also be the the piston (driver) is nicked or broken. If you don't want to take it apart shoot the tool without a nail and keep the trigger depressed, don't let it go. The piston should stay in the out position. Visually check it for wear or breakage.

    HF air tools are just fine. I have several that are still going strong.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  9. #9
    Chris Hatfield is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    380
    All good advice, thank you. I won't spent too terribly long troubleshooting it if it's the nailer.

    Good to hear the HF nailers are good, they've gotten good reviews.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,318
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hatfield View Post
    ...The hole the brad makes is elongated horizontally. They are 18-ga brads used in a Husky 2n1 nailer/stapler. I'm pretty sure I'm using the right nail in the nailer...
    The problem isn't you - it's that nailer/stapler combo. The driver portion of it is wide enough to accommodate the quarter inch wide stapler, and that's the mark you're seeing.

    A dedicated nailer (only) will have a driver that's only the size of the nail head, and that's the tool you really want.

    I use 18ga brads a lot, but for finer work - trim molding, etc. - I really like the little 23ga pinners. Like Brent said, the practically leave no mark at all.

    I don't have the HF set of nailers, but I've actually heard very good things about them. Sure, they're not Senco's, but they're good nailers for a hobbiest. I'd get them.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-16-2012, 01:43 PM
  2. Brad Nailer and Finish Nailer problems
    By Doug DeVore in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-09-2010, 04:23 PM
  3. WTB 15/16 ga nailer
    By Jim Evatt in forum Old Ads
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-30-2010, 03:48 AM
  4. pin nailer question
    By Dan Noren in forum Old Iron
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-07-2009, 11:22 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-29-2008, 05:14 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •