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Thread: chisel choice

  1. #1
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    chisel choice

    ok: i am sure there are many brands, that one or another thinks are there favorite..but my question is, are the longer handles and longer blades(insert right name) better for hand work than the the bench chisels or i should say the job site chisels like a no. 60 stanley? because after having some difficulty with what i have to do some dove tails,, i might be looking for some different chisels.
    so to you that are more up on this hand tool stuff than me what are your choices and reasons for it..? you can plug your brand, be it old or new.. may save me time typing another question..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  2. #2
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    Can't reccomend brands. But the long ones are more suited for banging with a mallet.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  3. #3
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    Tool pig reporting for duty, sir.

    Lots of good chisels out there, and you can do fine dovetails with many of them. I used a set of ash handled Marples for 20+ years that I bought new for around $30 or 40. They work fine, but get dull easily.

    The LN chisels are great, but may be a little small for your hands. Best to try one on before buying.

    Pfeil Swiss made are mid priced and take a great edge. I saw a used set of about 6 of them for around $125 - this is a good deal.

    If you have time, you can assemble a set of older fine chisels - that is an inexpensive way to go, but can take a long time, a really long time. Adam Cherubini has said he doesn't need bevel edged chisels for dovetails. Maybe he doesn't, but I do. On the less expensive chisel, there is often a wider land - the vertical part of the edge before the beveled side bevels away. This can get in the way of fine dovetails.

    One of the things to consider is how much you're going to be smacking the chisels with a mallet. I like to have at it, and any of the three brands above stand up well - though like I said, the Marples go dull really quickly.

  4. #4
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    Add "Two Cherries" to Ken's list.

    I use a set of Japanese chisels that I brought back from there about 1979 - before the Japanese tool craze happened here. They were still affordable - even cheap(!) - back then.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    ok: i am sure there are many brands, that one or another thinks are there favorite..but my question is, are the longer handles and longer blades(insert right name) better for hand work than the the bench chisels or i should say the job site chisels like a no. 60 stanley? because after having some difficulty with what i have to do some dove tails,, i might be looking for some different chisels.
    so to you that are more up on this hand tool stuff than me what are your choices and reasons for it..? you can plug your brand, be it old or new.. may save me time typing another question..
    I have a fine set of Two Cherries that I spent a good amount of time flattening the backs and de-finishing the handles. They work very well, but I am going to get a set of Lie Nielsens so that everything matches up in imperial units (hand drill, planes and chisels). I will keep the metric, but I am tired of everything being just a little off when going from drill to chisel. Yeah, I have metric drill bits for the drill press, but not my auger drill!

    I am also looking for paring chisels in O1 steel and imperial sizes (long thin blades). I am a little leery of Sorby and Henry Taylor due to some feedback on their steel, but that is the style I am looking for.

    Good advice from Ken on trying out the chisels before buying. I have tried the Lie Nielsens they are just the right size for me.

    You know, you can modify your chisels by grinding the edges so that you have a better edge clearance when dovetailing. I will try and find an article I have seen on it somewhere.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  6. #6
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    I have a set that I don't know the brand but the steel says Made in Sheffied England and they really hold an edge.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Satko View Post

    You know, you can modify your chisels by grinding the edges so that you have a better edge clearance when dovetailing. I will try and find an article I have seen on it somewhere.
    IIRC, Derek Cohen wrote about doing that on his site:
    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMad...ailchisel.html

    BTW, it's a great site.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken werner View Post
    IIRC, Derek Cohen wrote about doing that on his site:
    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMad...ailchisel.html

    BTW, it's a great site.
    Bingo! That was the one I was thinking of, thanks Ken.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken werner View Post
    IIRC, Derek Cohen wrote about doing that on his site:
    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMad...ailchisel.html

    BTW, it's a great site.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Satko View Post
    I have a fine set of Two Cherries that I spent a good amount of time flattening the backs and de-finishing the handles. They work very well, but I am going to get a set of Lie Nielsens so that everything matches up in imperial units (hand drill, planes and chisels). I will keep the metric, but I am tired of everything being just a little off when going from drill to chisel. Yeah, I have metric drill bits for the drill press, but not my auger drill!

    I am also looking for paring chisels in O1 steel and imperial sizes (long thin blades). I am a little leery of Sorby and Henry Taylor due to some feedback on their steel, but that is the style I am looking for.

    Good advice from Ken on trying out the chisels before buying. I have tried the Lie Nielsens they are just the right size for me.

    You know, you can modify your chisels by grinding the edges so that you have a better edge clearance when dovetailing. I will try and find an article I have seen on it somewhere.
    you guys are mean!!!!!!1 now i need to find some old chisels and have one of those spinny guys make me some purty handles..
    ok here is my list from what i have read here so far,, i need a 1/8,1/4,3/8/1/2,3/4,1 to make a good set.. socket chisels correct me if i have missed something
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  10. #10
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    Find the chisel(s), Larry, and I'll make you a handle.

    But you will have to decide if you want pretty or if you want robust. Curly stuff or Osage orange, as an example.

    Bet you could find a handle maker here for each chisel you find.

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