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Thread: Rasping to a Straight Line

  1. #1
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    Rasping to a Straight Line

    Just sharing in case this helps someone or gives them a new idea. I have several rasps that I use for various curves and shaping tasks. I picked up one of these Shinto rasps for a project. It arrived after it would have come in handy but has been very handy since. I never thought about using a rasp to straighten something(?).

    I used my jigsaw to cut out a template I need for something. One edge didn't turn out as straight as I would like. Blade was dull, swapped blades and the other three edges cut like buttah.

    To correct the bad path I clamped the template into the vise with the errant edge in a position that would bring the corrected edge even with a piece of milled scrap.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I rest my hand on the scrap and move the scrap like a sled guiding the rasp evenly along the edge. This rasps away the high spot leaving me the nice crisp rectangle I am after.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by glenn bradley; 01-01-2011 at 06:54 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Very slick trick. Like the rasp too...

  3. #3
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    would yu get that rasp again glenn been looking but havnt taken the plunge for one,, also some fine cut aurous as well..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    would yu get that rasp again glenn been looking but havnt taken the plunge for one,, also some fine cut aurous as well..
    It has a fine side and a coarse side and is pretty useful. I have seen the ones with the second handle on them that you use like a plane but I generally need to get into tight spots when rasping so I got the straight version.

    The pricey French rasps are a beauty to behold but I don't know that the result outshines a Dragon rasp by over twice the price. The Auriou's do come with a handle though ;-) I have neither so please, ask an owner for a more valid opinion.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  5. #5
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    Thanks Glenn for sharing that tip. I am amazed to see the rasp actually trim up that particle board without ripping the back edge out. Did you keep the scrap sled tight up against the surface of the back so as to prevent tearout on that side as you pushed the rasp?

    What about those metal rasps that look like the kitchen ginger rasp. Made of stainless and have little egdes pushed up. They pretty sharp things. I have an old hand me down Stanley like that for which i cannot get any new blade but it still can do its job but i remember when it was new way back when i was a teenager. It was the go to tool to fix up my messes.
    cheers

  6. #6
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    Cool tip Glenn. I like the rasp
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Did you keep the scrap sled tight up against the surface of the back so as to prevent tearout on that side as you pushed the rasp?
    No. This material is "throw-away" material that are used to seperate stacks of product in delivery trucks. It is like a low grace particle board. The diamond pattern on the Shinto (its like a lattice of hacksaw blades) took it out pretty clean surprisingly enough. On a fibrous material like red oak or ash you could certainly clamp a backer to the piece being worked.

    What about those metal rasps that look like the kitchen ginger rasp.
    I have one of those in the rougher Shur-form style that is great for drywall. I recall Sam Maloof stating that he used similar tools for roughing out shapes but, I haven't used them for that purpose.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    No. This material is "throw-away" material that are used to seperate stacks of product in delivery trucks. It is like a low grace particle board. The diamond pattern on the Shinto (its like a lattice of hacksaw blades) took it out pretty clean surprisingly enough. On a fibrous material like red oak or ash you could certainly clamp a backer to the piece being worked.



    I have one of those in the rougher Shur-form style that is great for drywall. I recall Sam Maloof stating that he used similar tools for roughing out shapes but, I haven't used them for that purpose.
    I have several old rasps that were my Dads I also have the micro plane (looks like a kitchen tool). Sam used his a lot when I took the workshop. He said it was one of his favorite tools for shaping.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
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    Glenn,

    Since this is what happened to me and I have a brand new Shinto Rasp---I'll go try it. In fact I will leave this post open while I go try it.

    Sorry. It took a few minutes. I had to joint a 2x4 scrap to the proper width to align with my straight line on the 3/4" Baltic Birch.
    I used the "fine" side of the Shinto. It worked great. It worked fast. I got what I wanted.

    Pics attached. Perhaps I should not do that. I did a fast Rube Goldberg setup. I did vary from Glenn, in that I put my reference plane in front of the target wood where he had his behind the target wood.

    Enjoy,
    JimB

    If any questions, let me know.
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  10. #10
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    I have one of the Shinto rasps also Glenn and they do work really well, I have been using it for a few years and it was well worth the price
    I'm supposed to respect my elders, but its getting harder and harder for me to find one now.

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