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Thread: Some Flatwork....

  1. #1
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    Oct 2006
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    Some Flatwork....

    The Mama san at the sushi shop that I deliver to uses this battered old tray to bring hot green tea to the customers. It is store bought and most likely turned in Asia somewhere. It is made out of three pieces of wood, and they were glued together in such a way as the grain did not even sort of run in similar directions, thus, over the years the tray is no longer flat, and it has several crack in it. The rim is broken in several spots too, as it was very thin and delicate.

    She is a very nice lady, always giving me or my daughters little presents of some kind. I saw that tray again just before new years and I know that until it is completely destroyed that she will not buy a new one, so I decided to make her a new one........

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Another nice looking piece of that Evil Keyaki wood

    The platter is about 10"/25cm in diameter and about 5/8" tall, thin, but not too thin, and the edge should hold up to some abuse.

    The hardest part of doing this platter was getting the inside surface flat, it was a challenge to say the least. Using the Easy Wood Tools Ci0 tool really helped with the final cuts on this and then the regular ROS with the #80 grit on it also came in handy The bottom is slightly recessed so that outer ring of the platter sits on the counter or table. I finished it with two coats of the Formby's Tung Oil, and knocked down any sheen with some 00 steel wool, but I am considering putting a couple of coats of poly on it, as it will see daily use and abuse, hot cups of green tea. I don't want the poly to make it look like plastic, but maybe that is something I'll just have to acceptor maybe I'll apply 2 or 3 more coats of the Formby's Tung oil

    Anyway, nice way to spend part of the day off I had on the 2nd, and get some turning done.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    bethel springs TN, but was born and raised in north east PA
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    Stu not only a nice gesture, but one sharp looking tray. I'm sure it will be well recived.
    Last edited by Stephen Bellinger; 01-03-2011 at 11:17 PM.

  3. #3
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    Amherst, New Hampshire
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    Flatwork

    The wood is amazing. Never seen anything quite like it before. Nice job and nice gift.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gibson View Post
    Flatwork

    The wood is amazing. Never seen anything quite like it before. Nice job and nice gift.

    Bob, I thought Stu hit the wrong sub forum too, but that's one beauty of a tray. Great Job!

    Stu, as much as you don't want the plastic look, given the environment it will live in, the Poly might be the way to go... perhaps a mix of tung, blo and poly might work?
    -Ned

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    perhaps a mix of tung, blo and poly might work?
    Or dip it in epoxy...
    (waterproof is the goal!)
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

  6. #6
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    Dip epoxy would be pricey, but I do think I'll be putting several coats of poly on it, I will warm the poly with a few drops of yellow dye.

    I call it flatwork, because the platter's top surface is flat, which is not the usual thing in turning, usually you don't have much if anything flat, or straight Which is one reason so many of us enjoy turning
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
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    "Evil Keyaki wood"? I'd say it's more like Wicked! (As in, it turned out great! )

    I bet she'll be thrilled when she sees it. Don't forget to report back on the hand-off.

  8. #8
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    Nice tray, nicer gesture. I'm sure she will be thrilled.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Burton View Post
    "Evil Keyaki wood"? I'd say it's more like Wicked! (As in, it turned out great! )

    I bet she'll be thrilled when she sees it. Don't forget to report back on the hand-off.

    No, it is EVIL

    the stuff is wonderful to look at when done, but getting there is not a lot of fun. It dulls your edge just looking at the wood, and it cracks and splinters horribly, plus it is so freaking hard it is like trying to turn concrete, it just about rings like a bell when you get it too thin and the vibrations are awful.

    I am learning to deal with it, but is is not fun wood to turn. In comparison, turning Maple or Walnut, heck, I can do that with one hand and my eyes closed it is so easy

    I agree that is sure looks wicked!

    I'll for sure tell you about the hand off.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
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    Dec 2007
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    Beautiful tray/platter Stu and a real nice gesture.

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