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Thread: tough choice-Leigh d4r pro or PC Omni 24 inch

  1. #1
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    tough choice-Leigh d4r pro or PC Omni 24 inch

    any advice anyone can offer that would steer me towards one of these would be appreciated, or any advice that would steer me away would be appreciated also.
    I want a minimum of 24 inch jig.
    Most of my interest is for drawers, but Id like to do some solid cabinets with dovetailed joinery.

  2. #2
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    I have the D4R and am very happy with it. That being said, were I to make the same choice today (I purchased mine about 5 years ago), I would go for the PC. They took the Leigh and made it easier, cleaner, and quicker to use. IMHO
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
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  3. #3
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    Allen, any chance you'd consider something besides the Leigh or PC? Or have you narrowed your decision down to just those two?
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  4. #4
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    both of these seem to get the most consistant reviews and positive remarks.
    What do you have in mind?

  5. #5
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    Since you'd like the capacity to handle wider stock, "minimum of 24 inch", would you consider the Router Boss? The smallest of the three has a clamping capacity of 25" and the middle one, 31" of clamping capacity. Actually with a change to the way you clamp up the work, you could get a couple of additional inches if you want. I upgraded mine to the 470 so I can clamp up to a 36" wide piece for dovetails.

    The Router Boss doesn't limit you to one specific dovetail bit angle so you can use any and all dovetail bits out there. And you can use the slender HSS dovetail bits which will make what I think are nicer looking dovetail sockets than the carbide bits. Of course you can still use the carbide bits if you wish. Dovetail spacing is entirely up to you. In fact you can do the layout on the fly if you want. You could even do real needle pins say on the bandsaw or by hand and cut the pins on the Router Boss if you were so inclined.

    Price might be a bit higher than the Leigh or the PC but it's not just a dovetail machine either. Tapered sliding dovetails, mortises, tenons, edge profiling, dowels, etc. are all easy on the Router Boss.

    Another thing that's nice is that it doesn't have to take up real estate on your work bench. It is designed to on the wall so it is always put away but always ready for use.

    Might be more info than you want but I thought I'd put it out there anyway. I almost bought a Leigh some years ago but I'm glad I went the route I did instead.

    Of course asking a bunch of woodworkers which is the best tool will generally elicit a variety of answers and no consensus.
    Last edited by Dave Richards; 01-20-2011 at 01:22 PM.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  6. #6
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    I like my D4.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  7. #7
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    Here's a link for the Router Boss

    Router Boss

  8. #8
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    Thanks Brent. I should have included that.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  9. #9
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    I was curious about it!

    Looks like quite a lot of parts. Still trying to figure out how it actually cuts the dovetails...

  10. #10
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    There are a lot of parts but it is all quite straightforward. There's videos on the site showing how dovetails are cut but the basics are: set the guides up for a straight in and out movement of the router with the dovetail bit and cut the sockets by pulling the router through the work. To cut the pins, you set the guide rails at the angle that matches the angle of the dovetail bit and use a straight cutter to remove the waste between the pins.

    If you want half-blind dovetails you don't cut all the way to the front face when cutting the pins. You'll have a little clean up to do with a chisel since the straight bit can't get into the corners but once the clean up is done, the joint will look like a hand cut joint in its shape. Although you can cut half blind joints with the pin board mounted horizontally like you do on dovetail jigs, that's not the usual way.



    Here's a picture of my Router Boss set up to cut 1° off of square. I did that to rough out tapered sliding dovetails on new legs for an old swivel office chair. I say rough out because the dovetail sockets are in an old piece of cast iron and none of them are the same shape or size. I got pretty close with the Router Boss and trimmed a bit by hand from there. For cutting, say 8° dovetails you would set the green guides to 8° and be all set.
    Last edited by Dave Richards; 01-20-2011 at 02:59 PM.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

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