Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: copying art

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    new york city burbs
    Posts
    10,188

    copying art

    If I see a piece of art made from wood I find quite appealing, is it wrong(as in untasteful, dispicable, rude, or obnoxious) if I try to copy what I saw, just doing my own thing with it?
    Im not taking credit for creating it or designing it, just like it and want to build one.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,898
    Imatation is the sincerest form of flattery
    Jesus was a Woodworker

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,014
    I'm sure some will disagree with me, but woodworkers have been copying woodworkers ever since wood was invented. I see nothing wrong with it as long as you're not trying tell people it's your idea.

    Of course there are some people who can do nothing but copy the work of others, but you've proven that you're not too shy about picking up a pencil and designing your own stuff from scratch. You've earned the right to do a bit of copying, I think.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Courtenay/Comox Valley, British Columbia
    Posts
    3,220
    I'll be interested to hear the opinions of others...but I don't think so. Most art as we know it is inspired at least in some degree by the work of previous artists..

    And on this subject I'd like to recommend a terrific book that touches on the subject of what is art and what is not, what is real and what is fake, What's Bred in the Bone by Robertson Davies. It's the second one of a trilogy, but it can be read alone. A great book, engaging and thought-provoking.
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
    AKA The Rookie

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,831
    Walk through any art museum and you will find aspiring artists painting (attempted) copies of the masters.
    When I started writing fiction novels I read several by writers I like in an attempt to understand and emulate their style. One very successful author told me to read every third page to get the best idea of the style without getting caught up in the story.
    Sculptors do it.
    And woodworkers do it.
    My theory is that one can never exactly copy another's creation. We try to emulate and learn from others.
    Go for it.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    50
    I find it difficult to come up with something new. I find something that I like and try to reproduce it. I don't seem to have a good enough imagenation.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Constantine, MI
    Posts
    7,890
    When I design my own work I draw on inspiration (a part here, a part there) from others, like in my fireplace thread. However, I have, on at least two occasions, made a rather direct copy of an others work. In each case it was not for profit, but for a gift. In both cases I contacted the original builder and asked permission to copy, in my own amateurish way, his work to be given as a gift. Both were most gracious and consented with the request I build only one and not to sell it.
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
    www.wrworkshop.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inside the Beltway
    Posts
    2,666
    Allen,

    The key here is honest, ethical intent. For example, I once made a cutting board, based on a design by Vaughn. I talked to Vaughn about it in advance, and he was very generous in giving me advice and design ideas. When I gave the piece away as a gift, I told the recipient all about Vaughn.

    In other words, I made sure to give acknowledgment and attribution. I didn't try to claim the idea as my own, or remain silent as to its origins. This is standard courtesy.

    Say I made a rocking chair, and used one by Sam Maloof as a model, and sold it. If I told prospective buyers "This chair was inspired by one made by the great Sam Maloof," they'd nod and say it's beautiful. My conscience would be clear. But if I simply said "I made this chair," they be right to reprove me...

    Thanks,

    Bill

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    I don't think Art would mind, why don't you ask him ?
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,831
    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    I don't think Art would mind, why don't you ask him ?
    We need a "moan" similie.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •