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Thread: Laquer, wet sanding, buffing, etc.

  1. #1
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    Laquer, wet sanding, buffing, etc.

    I am working on some snare drums, and I am getting to the finishing now. I picked up a quart of minwax clear gloss laquer. I have not done any type of polished gloss finishes yet. Is laquer a good finish for this application. I have a binks spray gun, not sure of the model, its a siphon style( cup under the gun) Where should I start? I have never used laquer before either, will this yellow much?

  2. #2
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    Laquer will be a great finish but as with any oil based finish it will yellow. If you want a finish that won't yellow the only finish I have found is water based poly.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Laquer will be a great finish but as with any oil based finish it will yellow. If you want a finish that won't yellow the only finish I have found is water based poly.
    is it going to be a lot of yellowing, will the yellowing be over time or will there be some right away like with polyurethane. What steps do I take to get a really glossy finish typical of musical instruments.

  4. #4
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    The yellowing will be right away
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
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    I don't know what lacquer Don uses, but in my experience, the yellowing will be relatively slight. Much less than a typical oil finish. The wood will likely darken before the lacquer does. Most cabinet work and a lot of furniture is finished with lacquer. Musical instruments, too.

    I use a lot of spray lacquer on my turned pieces. I use the stuff in spray cans, but shot from a gun is also fine. You'll probably need to thin the stuff you have. I'll let someone with more experience shooting lacquer offer advice on how much to thin it.

    Anyway, I apply in light coats, building up sometimes as many as 10 to 15 of them. (Although I just finished a holly piece that looked the way I wanted after just a couple of coats.) Every 3 or 4 coats, I'll wet sand with 600 grit sandpaper to level the surface and remove any dust nibs. After I get the desired thickness built up, I wet sand with 600, then use a spindle-mounted buffing wheel with tripoli compound, then another with white diamond compound, then I finish off with Renaissance Wax applied by hand and buffed out with a clean wheel. On flatwork projects, I've done essentially the same thing, except used automotive rubbing compound, then buffing compound, to bring out the high gloss. Done right, you can get a "grand piano" finish that you can see your reflection in.

    Lately, I've started using mineral spirits as my wet sanding liquid. It seems to lubricate better than water, and if I do happen to sand through the lacquer and into the wood (it's happened more than once) it doesn't tend to raise the grain the way water does.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

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  6. #6
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    while Vaughn may have more expierence with lacquers then I in my limited exposure to them in restoreing antiques I have found some yellowing that why I prefer water based poly. I am sure that many other out there can give there opinions. I prefer to air on the side of caution.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
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    I agree that waterbased poly is probably the clearest, but any yellowing that lacquer adds is very slight in my opinion. A lot of very fine musical instruments are finished with lacquer, but only in recent years have I seen WB poly starting to be used, and that's just by a handful of luthiers. Not sure what drum manufacturers are using these days, but they were done with lacquer back in the 80s when I worked at a drum store. (The again, I don't think WB poly was around back then. It seems like it'd be a durable finish. Not as easily repaired as lacquer, though.)

    This guy's using lacquer...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlFsJ...eature=related
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
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    lacquer is not going to yellow very much at al. Use a very fine stgeel wool with a good wax to b uff it out. or 2000 gt wet sand then wax. I should look great.l
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  9. #9
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    I also agree on the lacquer. I've been using it on cabs and now turnings for close to 30 years. have never seen the discoloring like that of poly.
    Steve

  10. #10
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    I looked at my spray gun today, its a binks model 69, What pressure is it best to run these things at. Its been laying around for much longer than I have been doing this type of stuff so I have never seen instructions on it.

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