Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Fastest Box Joint Jig in the west...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,361

    Fastest Box Joint Jig in the west...

    Well, only the making part, I'm sure they all take about the same amount of time to use...

    Made a piece of wood 3/8" thick, mounted up 3/8" worth of dado blade in the table saw.

    Took a piece of scrap ply, drilled a couple of holes in it and mounted it to my Incra 1000se. Raised the blade to 3/4" about the table and made the first cut. Put a chunk of the 3/8" wide wood in the cut out. Slide it over a bit and used another piece of 3/8" wide wood to get the rough distance to the blade. Made a test cut, needed tightening up a bit, so loosened the bolts I mounted it to the fence with a bit and badabingbadaboom, There you have it, a box joint jig!

    (Oh and I messed up a bit when I made it. This one goes from right to left when using, as opposed to the traditional left to right... )





    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails FWW-4111.jpg   FWW-4110.jpg   FWW-4112.jpg   FWW-4109.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Catalunya
    Posts
    4,632
    Cool jig Brent, so I guess that's part of the things needed to make your shop cabinets and finish your shop reorganization.

    I've bookmarked it, and put together with others that I plan to make when I get a TS, (not in the near future I'm afraid to say).
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,361
    Yeah, I finally picked what kind of joint I wanted to use for the drawers in the shop cabinets.

    Considered plain old butt joints, butt joints with pocket screws, Locking rabbets, lock miters, sliding dovetails, half blind dovetails on a machine. But I kept coming back to the venerable box joint...

    It's quick, and easy, and strong, and I can crank a lot of them out in a hurry...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,076
    Very cool Brent. I do the same thing with a sacrificial fence clamped to one of my sleds. I have been fascinated in the past with complex box-joint jigs but thankfully, never coughed up the dough for one ;-)
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    Looks good rent. Mine is similar but I just clamp it to my Dado sled.
    "Thereís a lot of work being done today that doesnít have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesnít have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,260
    Very cool Brent this is the joint my son learnt to make at school this past week. Only he used the router.

    Which brings up a point which is better blades on ts or router.

    I like the idea of brents one but its just because i like the ts.

    Would think using blades one can hog out a 3/4 thick finger in one go which is not neccessary gonna happen on the router table.

    Can anyone comment on this.
    cheers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,361
    Most dado sets have a bit of a scoring action on the outer blades to reduce chipout. That's probably great for a dado, but it does leave little 'marks' just a fraction deeper on the corners.

    Dan Noren recently got a set of special TS blades that are geared for making box joints for valentines day recently

    So for fine work, a router, or specialty saw blades would give you a truly flat bottom. For knocking out a bunch of shop cabinets, or more utilitarian use, a TS with a dado blade would be more than sufficient.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Syracuse, Nebraska
    Posts
    669
    If you get a flat top grind blade (designated as FTG) you will get a square kerf. Most blades are alternate top bevel (ATB) and give a kerf that has a protrusion in the center. You can also stack FTG blades for a wider kerf, just make sure the tooth geometry doesn't interfere between the two blades shim with paper or cardboard and tighten down well.

    As far as the jig goes....fewer moving parts, fewer chances for mistakes. I drilled a hole in the miter gauge so I could dowel each jig to be in the same place, then make the jig for each width I want to cut.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Northern Lower Michigan/Troll
    Posts
    196
    Thats the way I do mine on my slider. I do all four parts at one time by shifting two 1 pin. I use a dab of hot melt glue to make sure they don't shift. When done you just peel the glue off and they are in nice sets ready for assembly.

    I like box joints. They have a better gluing surface than dovetails, and in my humble opinion are a better choice for drawers that will see heavy use. Not as sexy, but stout. My bench has poplar drawer boxes, and some have well over 100#s in them[clamps] and have survived many years of abuse with none broken. I intended to pin them but never got to it.

    My favorite is the pin and cresent joint. In examining old furniture I have never seen one that has failed.
    Last edited by Larry Edgerton; 02-18-2011 at 03:07 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Edgerton View Post
    ...My favorite is the pin and cresent joint. In examining old furniture I have never seen one that has failed.
    I had to go look that type of joint up. Very cool.

    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

Similar Threads

  1. This one's for Rob World's fastest Sail Boat
    By Don Baer in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-03-2012, 02:35 AM
  2. It alive but my Monkey is out west somewhere
    By Jay Caughron in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 04-09-2010, 01:38 PM
  3. Hello from West Texas
    By Michael Willett in forum Welcome and Introductions
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 03-03-2010, 02:55 PM
  4. It's Been Really Hot Out West!
    By Dan Mooney in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-04-2009, 11:37 PM
  5. Screw clamps - the easiest, fastest and cheapest (for me)
    By Niki Avrahami in forum Jigs and Fixtures
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-24-2008, 05:27 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •