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Thread: How long for DNA Pics added

  1. #1
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    How long for DNA Pics added

    Ok so I got these chunks of Hickory sitting in a bucket of DNA. How long should they sit for?
    Is there a way of knowing that they have been in long enough?
    I read some place that they should sit in the DNA until they float. I'm thinking that this stuff wont float on ice let alone DNA
    Last edited by Chuck Thoits; 02-20-2011 at 02:51 AM.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  2. #2
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    Chuck - I haven't had the chance to do hickory, but I have had good luck soaking cherry, maple and soft maple for at least 24 hours, then bagging for 4 weeks. The one piece of soft maple was forgotten in the DNA bucket for about 2 weeks. I didn't bag it and it didn't crack. I do have to finish turning it.

    I would think 24 hours would be good, but one thing is for sure. You can soak it for too short a time and it will crack. If you soak it for longer than necessary, it won't crack.
    Rich (the Yooper)

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  3. #3
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    Chuck,
    I don't have a difinitive answer, but I've soaked woods in DNA for a couple of days.. once for a week because I forgot it... if you have the wood partially turned it will benefit from the soaking better than a solid chuck...

    I soaked a piece of "rainbow poplar" ... don't know where the "rainbow" came from... it was almost totally black, smelled like a swamp bog, was soaking wet, completely covered in wax, so I rough turned the bowl, soaked it for a day then bagged it to dry for a couple of weeks... made a beautiful bowl.... too bad I didn't pay closer attention and cut the bottom too thin...

    Also did a chunk of bradford pear that was rough turned for a candle stick.. was about 2 1/2 diameter because was going to be a tower candle stick... it cracked in the DNA...
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
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  4. #4
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    Chunk update
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails tn_mal 002.JPG   tn_mal 004.JPG   tn_mal 005.JPG   tn_mal 006.JPG   tn_mal 008.JPG  

    tn_mal 009.JPG   tn_mal 010.JPG   tn_mal 011.JPG  
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
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  5. #5
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    Chuck I leave my wood in the DNA for 5 days no less. I have also left it in for longer I think it was 9 days with no problems. Normally though it is 5 days. Take it out and let it flash dry then wrap in a brown grocery sack with one end left open.
    Bernie W.

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  6. #6
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    Glad U posted this question. I was at my favorite wood supplier and the owners son just brought down a large Maple burl from their mill in Oregon ( large like in it fills up a pallet). He has it wrapped and sealed and was wondering how to keep it from checking. I mentioned DNA but couldn't tell him how long to soak it. I think in this case a month would work.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
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  7. #7
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    So, Just as a question, the whole point of soaking in DNA is to dry something out, without it cracking, right?

    Alcohol, being hygroscopic will pull the H2O out of the wood?

    And will do it faster and more evenly than air drying?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Logan & Bucky's servant
    So, Just as a question, the whole point of soaking in DNA is to dry something out, without it cracking, right?

    Alcohol, being hygroscopic will pull the H2O out of the wood?

    And will do it faster and more evenly than air drying?
    The alcohol replaces the water, the alcohol will dry out faster, yes, but the big difference between the water and the DNA is that because the DNA evaporates faster. Water evaporates slower, so there is more of a moisture difference for a longer time between the dry part and the wet part of the wood, or at least that is how I understand it
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Glad U posted this question. I was at my favorite wood supplier and the owners son just brought down a large Maple burl from their mill in Oregon ( large like in it fills up a pallet). He has it wrapped and sealed and was wondering how to keep it from checking. I mentioned DNA but couldn't tell him how long to soak it. I think in this case a month would work.
    [Drooling...] For something like a big burl, DNA might not be effective. It'd be hard to know if it had soaked all the way through the wood. For turned pieces and smaller chunks of lumber like Chuck's, there's a good chance the DNA will go all the way through. That's why bowl blanks typically aren't soaked before being rough turned. Also, I don't know if the DNA would be cost effective, either. (It'd take a lot of gallons to cover a pallet-sized chunk.) All of the burl I've seen sold was either wax coated or air dried.

    You can tell the wood guy I'd be glad to take the problem off his hands, though. I'd even send him pics to let him know how it all came out.
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  10. #10
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    Ok they are out and wrapped up. I have wrapped them like a Christmas present. What say ye all should I open up one end?
    Should I open up both ends?
    Or should I leave them wrapped up tight?
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

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