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Thread: Any insurance people on here?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Any insurance people on here?

    I am in the process of building a new house, it is roughed in now, and I am looking at what to do with heat.

    At my last house I built a U shaped concrete structure under the fireplace in the basement, and in that spot was a woodstove that heated the fireplace from underneath. Four steps away was a concrete room, walls, floor and ceiling, sealed with a steel outside door and a chute on the outside that I could feed the wood into. The room was 14'x21', and would hold a winters wood. I would load it and put in a couple of bug bombs, and never had a problem with critters, and never had to go outside. Once the mass of the real fireplace was heated it held heat for days. Worked great, my ex appreciates it.

    Anyway.... I want to do the same thing with the house I am building now, but am having a hard time getting a straight answer from my insurance agent. Is there anyone here that works as an actuary, or can point me in the right direction?

    The house is small, 1180 sq. ft., so an increase in insurance of any size can wipe out any saving I will make. My current house is the same size, and I average 7-800 dollars a year for heat and hot water. The new house will be more efficient, but has taller ceilings[10'8"] and a bit more glass, much of that with a Southern exposure.

    It does not make economic sense to spend too much, or there will be no gain, and insurance has to be factored in. Part of it is that I like the idea of independance from the fuel companys in case, or should I say when, they raise their prices significantly. I can heat it with thedead wood on the property indefinately.

    Before someone brings it up, an outside wood boiler does not make economic sense for me. There would never be a payback, even not counting my time collecting wood. On a small efficient house they will never pay for themselves before they need replacement, and they lose aprox. 50% of their heat to transfer losses, which means half of the wood I cut would be going into the ground or the atmosphere. Don't like cutting wood that much.

    Thanks

    The other Larry

  2. #2
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    LARRY, I am a licensed insurance agent but only for health and life, sorry I don't have a clue on property insurance....
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    The biggest question that comes to my mind has to do with the floor and supporting structure under the fireplace. I sure hope it is not wood. When I was a volunteer fireman we had several calls a year in our small community because of floors under a fireplace catching fire. One layer of brick will not protect the wood.
    I would ask a fireman to inspect for you before alerting the insurance company.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    The biggest question that comes to my mind has to do with the floor and supporting structure under the fireplace. I sure hope it is not wood. When I was a volunteer fireman we had several calls a year in our small community because of floors under a fireplace catching fire. One layer of brick will not protect the wood.
    I would ask a fireman to inspect for you before alerting the insurance company.
    There was 14 yards of concrete under the fireplace in the basement under the floor, 12" thick concrete walls holding up an 18" thick concrete slab flush with the first floor.

    It was a real fireplace, last one my dad ever built. It weighed aprox. 32 ton, above the first floor. It never moved. 9' ceilings on both upstairs floors and then 14' through the roof.

    I don't build junk....

  5. #5
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    Your going to have to get that answer from the insurance company you are dealing with and get it in writing. Ask it in writing for that matter! Trust me on this, our advice is not even worth what it cost you.

    I had some not so nice dealings with an Insurance company so I know what I speak of. Get everything in writing and put in a bank safety deposit box or somewhere just as safe. If you ever need it you will be glad you did.

    I don't see how a fireplace/woodstove in the basement as well as upstairs would be an issue. Lots of people store wood in their house too. But it's doesn't matter what I or anyone else 'thinks'.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  6. #6
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    Jeff

    I don't trust them either, thats why I am doing research ahead of time.

    I was hoping there was an insurance type on here because I really do not know where to start. But I will get it in writing as you suggested when I do manage to nail someone down.

    I have heard of claims being denyed because of woodstoves, and although I don't expect any problems, I can't afford to start over again at my age, so I will have my butt covered ahead of time.

    Waht I am looking for is approval of my setup, BEFORE I build it. I may have to switch companys if I can't get a set of guidelines out of my current carrier.

  7. #7
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    Sometimes it is hard to pin them down and it is important to do that. One bit of advice I learned from my lawyer and this could vary from state to state so this goes back to what I said about how much our advice is worth.

    In my case he said that what I understood was covered would over ride the policy. The example he gave was the agent said "you are covered if ____ happens" and the policy says otherwise, the agents words will override the policy. The catch is proving that is what the Agent told you. It is your word against his. So that is why I say put it in writing and save it.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  8. #8
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    Larry,
    Find and independent Broker who is not tied to any 1 company. That way he can work for you not the insurance company. That is what I do. I have contracts with several providers so I can get the best coverage for the client. You need to fond someone like that for property insurance.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Horton View Post
    Sometimes it is hard to pin them down and it is important to do that. One bit of advice I learned from my lawyer and this could vary from state to state so this goes back to what I said about how much our advice is worth.

    In my case he said that what I understood was covered would over ride the policy. The example he gave was the agent said "you are covered if ____ happens" and the policy says otherwise, the agents words will override the policy. The catch is proving that is what the Agent told you. It is your word against his. So that is why I say put it in writing and save it.
    Jeff, in post #5 you emphasized getting it in writing. In #7 you advised that what an agent said overrides.
    Really, not so. What is written in the contract is the final word in court. I used to work for a company as their debt collector. I went after folks who had defaulted on contracts to purchase. In court they usually said, "But the sales guy said.....". I showed the signed, written contract and never lost a case. And, no, I'm not a lawyer.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    Jeff, in post #5 you emphasized getting it in writing. In #7 you advised that what an agent said overrides.
    Really, not so. What is written in the contract is the final word in court. I used to work for a company as their debt collector. I went after folks who had defaulted on contracts to purchase. In court they usually said, "But the sales guy said.....". I showed the signed, written contract and never lost a case. And, no, I'm not a lawyer.
    Frank is absolutely correct and in a court of law only the typed or printed portion of the contract would be included. If an agent altars the contract in any way he can loose his license.
    The NAIC (National Association of Insurance Commissioners) is very clear on this and if an agent has done this he/she should be reported to the commissioner in your state.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

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