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Thread: Turning plate or platter question

  1. #1
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    Turning plate or platter question

    OK 2trick here is going to try and branch out a little. I have a couple of nice planks for a plate or platter, and they are bigger than my current cole jaws on the 460. What do I need to hold it to turn the back side?
    Im looking for cheap and/or not time consuming as I have a box to build this month!
    Thanks in advance!
    Michael

  2. #2
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    2 words.... glue block
    "Thereís a lot of work being done today that doesnít have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesnít have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Although I've never turned anything I would call a platter, I'd probably just use a jam chuck... Of course, that's how I finish the bottom of everything I turn.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    2 words.... glue block
    Not to turn the back side. I guess you could, if you used hot melt glue and were sure you could remove the glue when done. I wouldn't risk it myself, though, especially if the wood's porous.

    Michael, I'm assuming the platters will be close to the max capacity of your lathe. If that's the case, two approaches that might work to finish off the bottom:

    1. Attach a disk of plywood (say 11 1/2" or so in diameter) to a faceplate. As an option, you can glue some 1/4" thick closed cell foam ("Fun Foam", it comes in sheets at Michael's) to the face of the disk. Using the tailstock and the dimple in the center of the tenon, push the platter face firmly onto the disk and get it centered. Then use mover's stretch wrap to cinch the platter even more tightly to the disk. Finish the bottom, keeping the tailstock in place until the very last minute, preferably until you're done cutting. The stretch wrap should hold things firmly enough to make any light finishing cuts (if necessary). I've done this on platters and bowls that were too big for my donut chuck, or couldn't be held with the vacuum chuck.

    2. You might be able to do the same stretch wrap approach with your cole jaws. Just hold it on place over the face of the jaws, and use stretch wrap to hold it onto the lathe (primarily for sanding.).
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

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  5. #5
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    I have done it using Vaughn's suggestion number 1. Although, I used masking tape to hold the platter against the plywood disk. It worked surprisingly well. I think shrink wrap should work even better.
    Chinese Proverb: Man who eats many prunes gets good run for the money.

  6. #6
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    I done 2 and finished them in about the same fashion. I turn the platter between centers, making a tenon and foot. Turn back to shape and sand to finish. Yup...still a tenon. Chuck up the tenon and turn face and finish. I had a chunk of something 4" wide and put a tenon on it and then turned a gentle curve to the front...call it a "pressure chuck". A 60 degree live center works good here. Hold the face of the platter to the pressure chuck adding foam or a couple pieces of foamy shelf liner between the 2 and bring the tail up stock. You already have the dimple in the tenon for center, so take a minute to get the wobble out. Start cutting down the tenon with light cuts!! Get it down to a nib, take it off the lathe and with a sharp hand chisel, just take it down. Hand or power sand, finish with whatever.
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  7. #7
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    There be gremlins in here... I swear I wrote a "thanks" note....but hmmm, dont seem to remember hitting send..... so thanks.
    Vaughn, thats helpful for sure...and Jim - Vaughn demo'd that flip, and use the live ctr which is a great help... a few more helpful things, and prolly stuff I already forgot!
    David, I could not visualize a jamchuck that would work - I think I can now.

    Again, thanks everbody that took the time to repsond to this request.
    Michael

  8. #8
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    I'd hope he show you that because he taught me!!!
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Burr View Post
    I'd hope he show you that because he taught me!!!
    And if you keep practicing it (and have a nice pointed detail gouge), you'll get where you can cut the nub off all the way while the lathe is still running. Saves the hand chisel step.

    You mentioned the 60ļ center...I prefer to use the cup center with the pointy thing in the middle. It's less likely to split the nub when you start whittling it down.

    This bowl is round-bottomed, so it has no foot, but this shows the stretch wrap in action. My friction chuck was a rough-turned bowl (with the rim trued up) over which I attached a natural edge bowl.



    Here's the nub on that bowl, about one or two light cuts from being all the way off...



    And here it is cut all the way through. In this pic I had turned off the lathe and moved the tailstock back a bit. I didn't move the tailstock until after I'd cut all the way through the nub, though. The shrink wrap was simply insurance, and a handy way to hold the bowl while I finished sanding the bottom. (Which I did with the lathe turned off.)

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Stretch Wrap Chuck 1 800.jpg   Cutting the Nub 1 800.jpg   Cutting the Nub 2 800.jpg  
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael james View Post
    OK 2trick here is going to try and branch out a little. I have a couple of nice planks for a plate or platter, and they are bigger than my current cole jaws on the 460. What do I need to hold it to turn the back side?
    Im looking for cheap and/or not time consuming as I have a box to build this month!
    Thanks in advance!
    Michael
    Michael,
    I've only turned one or two "platters"... don't think I did so good with them, but will improve as I try more... to reverse chuck, don't think a Jam chuck will work if the platter is very shallow... you might make a fairly flat jam chuck, use lots of strapping tape and the tail stock until your down to just a nub...
    or I have a "Longworth" chuck that I made from a piece of plywood, a glue block and some rubber chair leg bumpers... it works okay, but you have to be sure you're in there tight... if you remember my incident with the flying saucer (bowl) that clipped my cheek bone.... and blacked my eye....
    or a final solution if you have one or want to knock one out.... a vacuum chuck. You can use your shop vac as long as you have a big enough vacuum chamber in your chuck... I've watched a couple of videos on YouTube where the guys have used their shop vac and have used them for years... I think Bob Hamm up in Toronto (or somewhere in Canada.. it's a pretty small country so I'm sure all the Canadian turners know him ) has a tutorial on putting one together..... also Brian Higgins down in South Carolina has a video on Woodturners Resources.

    Also, I recently bought a cole jaws extension from PSI that will open to almost 16 inches... the extensions can be cut down on the band saw to fit over your ways, but it doesn't seem practical to buy them and then cut them up... I have to swing my headstock out board to use it, but it fits my Barracuda II with the Jumbo Cole jaws from PSI....
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
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