Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Ugly Tile Floor

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Courtenay/Comox Valley, British Columbia
    Posts
    3,220

    Ugly Tile Floor

    I live in a split-level house. One of the levels has a really ugly tile floor. Here it is. If it's not obvious it's light blue. I don't own anything blue. I don't like blue, and I'd like to do something with this floor.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	uglyfloortile.jpg 
Views:	47 
Size:	49.3 KB 
ID:	54848

    The space it covers is an odd shape, but it's roughly 350 ft2 in total. It's a part of the house that doesn't have a basement so the tile is set on a concrete slab. And the tile is in good shape. No cracks or obvious wear. This is a high traffic area--dirty high traffic. There's a door going to the outside, and a door going to the garage, then steps upstairs and steps downstairs.

    If I understand correctly, it's not easy to remove tile that's set directly onto the slab. I don't think changing the height of the floor will be a problem, because you already have to step down to go outside, go downstairs, and into the garage, and step up to go upstairs. I don't want vinyl because of the VOC's and I don't want carpet because of the dirt and high traffic.

    So what's your opinion about the easiest, least expensive options? Can you tile over tile? Engineered wood? Real wood floor? Anything else?

    Thanks for any and all replies.
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
    AKA The Rookie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Santa Claus, In
    Posts
    4,779
    More pics of whole area please. Regardless, the way you go, it could/ will be a lot of work.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    3,383
    This is the easiest one I know of: Allure flooring from Home Depot.

    It fails your "not vinyl" comment -- at least I think it does. It's flexible, but I honestly don't know what it is made of.

    But it was REAL EASY to install. Comes in several patterns, and you just lay it right overtop of the existing floor.

    I put it in my kitchen, rather than go through the hassle of ripping out vinyl + underlay.
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,360
    I've removed poorly set tile from a concrete slab before.

    Getting the tile up is easy, getting the old thinset can be a pain, but it honestly wasn't that bad.

    Having put down some laminate flooring, I can say that that isn't a bad way to go either. At least I think you can lay that down directly over tile. You'd need whatever kind of padding goes under it. Our laminate had the padding layer already attached to each strip

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,320
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    I've removed poorly set tile from a concrete slab before.

    Getting the tile up is easy, getting the old thinset can be a pain, but it honestly wasn't that bad.

    Having put down some laminate flooring, I can say that that isn't a bad way to go either. At least I think you can lay that down directly over tile. You'd need whatever kind of padding goes under it. Our laminate had the padding layer already attached to each strip
    BTDT, and what Brent says is right on.

    I'd be a bit apprehensive about using the Allure that Art recommended, though. It's more flexible, and may eventually settle into the grout joints, allowing them to 'telegraph' thru.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Buse Township MN
    Posts
    565
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    BTDT, and what Brent says is right on.

    I'd be a bit apprehensive about using the Allure that Art recommended, though. It's more flexible, and may eventually settle into the grout joints, allowing them to 'telegraph' thru.
    "Allure" is a floating vinyl floor, simple to install and wears well. It need to be installed over a smooth surface so if you choose to install it over tile, you'll need to fill the gout joints with a leveling compound to prevent them telegraphing thru!

    Laminate over tile, with the proper pad, would be my choice.
    Every child deserves a family. Adopt. Foster. Get involved.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oak Harbor Washington on Whidbey Island
    Posts
    3,134
    A good contractor would tell you to take it up & remove grout then install a floor of your preference.

    There is the right way the wrong way & the lazy way, take your choice.

    It's kinda like buying quality the first time & having no regrets. Or buying oh I can get by with this & then buying again later to get quality.

    (place old wet blanket here)
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Independence MO
    Posts
    561
    Quote Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
    A good contractor would tell you to take it up & remove grout then install a floor of your preference.
    This brought up a thought. I've replaced broken tiles at work. When there is moisture under them (like a floor you have wet down, and haven't mopped up), they start to separate from the thinset underneath them, and you can hear a hollow sound by dropping a quarter on them. Once separated, they break easily.
    Also if you grind/cut the grout out away from the tile, then the first one is a bear, but after that, they tend to pop up.
    The thinset can be scrapped up, or if going with a different tile, a heavier coat overlayed. (the right or lazy ways)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inside the Beltway
    Posts
    2,666
    Quote Originally Posted by Cynthia White View Post
    And the tile is in good shape. No cracks or obvious wear. This is a high traffic area--dirty high traffic.

    So what's your opinion about the easiest, least expensive options?
    Um, start liking blue?

    Seriously, you're talking about a lot of work, and about going with an option that's nowhere near as good for the purpose as what's already there. It would be counter-productive to replace that tile with anything less than tile.

    It's not all that hard to rip up the old stuff. One day, max. And maybe you can improve on the install, for example with a high quality underlayment.

    So, one day to rip out what's there. Another day of prepping the floor. A day to lay the new tile. Count another for shopping, and one for disposing of construction debris. So you're looking at probably 5 days of work and a thousand bucks. And the end result? A different color of tile.

    Like I said, are you sure you don't like blue?

    Thanks,

    Bill

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Whittier, CA, USA
    Posts
    512
    If the tile is absolutely solidly attached to the cement then you can go over it with just about anything. Remember that the additional height of new flooring over the tile will throw off the step height for any stairs going up or down from that surface.

    Unless it is very thick a vinyl sheet product will have the grout lines telegraph through from the tile sooner or later. You can float over the tile with a leveler if needed.

    If there are stairs going up/down from the tile area I would rent one of these guys and take it all out.



    Installing a good floor product correctly is always worth the time, work and money in the long run.

    Cheers,
    Dan Gonzales
    Whittier, CA, USA
    Dona nobis pacem

Similar Threads

  1. Ugly TN oak
    By Stephen Bellinger in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 05-20-2013, 04:03 PM
  2. Heavy Cabinet, Tile Floor, Your Choice of Feet?
    By glenn bradley in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-02-2013, 03:34 PM
  3. Bye Bye, Old Ugly Fireplace!
    By Brent Dowell in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 73
    Last Post: 04-14-2010, 07:19 PM
  4. Let me show you ugly
    By Robert Mickley in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-07-2009, 03:12 PM
  5. ugly visitor
    By Frank Fusco in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 05-16-2007, 01:36 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •