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Thread: I'm never doing this again.....

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    I'm never doing this again.....

    I guess there's lots of things that I don't care to repeat in my life, and if I had to make this mistake again it wouldn't be the worst things I've ever done. It was a serious pain in the rear to make though. Digging out the hour glasses about gave me fits. I didn't keep real close track of time, but I've got in the neighborhood of eight hours into it. All for a anniversary present for a woman I'm no longer with.














    "Do, or do not. There is no try."
    -Yoda



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    Vancouver Island, Courtenay/Comox Valley, British Columbia
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    I can't even imagine the skill, the hours, and the sweat required to do that...

    BTW, Karl. You're a good guy.
    Last edited by Cynthia White; 04-01-2011 at 05:11 AM.
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Amherst, New Hampshire
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    Way beyond my pay grade Beautifully done.

    I don't think I want to know the story behind it though
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Muskegon,Mi.
    Posts
    109

    Thumbs up

    Thats really a nice corner treatment.
    SOMEDAY is not a day of the week

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
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    Now lets see If I were doing it I would assemble the frame, putting in the bow tie and then bevel the whole frame, Am I correct ?
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gibson View Post
    I don't think I want to know the story behind it though
    Not much of a story. I said I'd make a frame for that oil painting. Didn't have time to do so, anniversary came and went, we split a month later, two months after that I finally git it done.

    Doing my best to be the better person, and more over, be a man of my word.
    "Do, or do not. There is no try."
    -Yoda



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Billings Missouri near Springfield Mo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl Brogger View Post
    Not much of a story. I said I'd make a frame for that oil painting. Didn't have time to do so, anniversary came and went, we split a month later, two months after that I finally git it done.

    Doing my best to be the better person, and more over, be a man of my word.
    Had to do under the circumstances but GOOD for you Karl you are the better man for it.
    A Turn N Time
    Components for John Smith Organs and the Hobby Organ Builder

    Frog Pond Guitars


    Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Uniquely Kool Karl Nice job on both parts

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Now lets see If I were doing it I would assemble the frame, putting in the bow tie and then bevel the whole frame, Am I correct ?
    Don-

    Not exactly.

    -I squared and flatten the material. (honestly the first time I've ever really had to do that) Then tossed it through the planer, and ripped them to width.

    -I cut two rabbets in the back of the pieces. One to take the painting, the other to accept a small strip that got screwed in to hold the painting in.

    -I cut the bevel on the face in the tablesaw by cutting the piece's on edge. I just eyeballed the angle to get it approximately where I wanted it to fall. The tablesaw didn't make a full cut, but really close. I finished it off with a a couple of passes with a block plane.

    -Then I cut the bevel on the backside on the outside edge. I think that was done flat, and somewhere around 30*

    -Cut and mitred the pieces. Didn't fit them, just cut them.

    -Realized clamping was going to be tough, so I cut a scrap of melamine to slightly smaller than the dimensions of the frame so the pieces would lie flat. I also threw a pocket screw into each corner on the backside.

    -Glued and clamped, let it sit in the clamps for 20 minutes, then pulled it out and put in the pocket screws in.

    -For the hour glasses I just squared up a piece, and cut the insides out on the tablesaw. Just a matter of running it through until you get the height set properly so it comes out nicely.

    -Cut off four pieces of the hour glass stick. I think I made them 2-1/2" long, or there about.

    -Now the tricky part..... I'm calling it a triple compound mitre. I needed a way to mark out the parts on the bevel, but the bevel had to be cut at a compound miter on both sides to straddle the miter. I cut it with two different bevel gauges in the table saw, and just eyeballing the depth. it was done with mostly trial and error. I'll picture of the piece tomorrow if I remember at the shop. Honestly this was the hardest part.

    -After that I just set my marking template where I wanted it, marked it out with a utility knife, (should have done this with a x-acto knife), then using a 1/8" brad point drill bit I drilled out the corners, the basically did as much as I could with another 5/16" brad point drill bit. Then it was just a matter of removing the rest of the material with chisels.

    -Tapped in the plug for the hole with plenty of glue. You gotta take some time with this as the the glue can create some hydraulic issues, and on the later ones I did I actually used a Jorgeson clamp to get it to find home.

    -I cut them off with a skill saw. Wasn't shooting for flush, just remotely close. Took a few passes. I hit it with a belt sander with 80g to get it almost flush, then 120g to get it flush, and to clean up any discrepancies in the mitre (one side being higher than the other.) Wasn't much but way easier with a belt sander than a orbital.

    -After that it was just a matter sanding as normal. I hit it with 150g, then 220g, and broke the edges.

    Honestly, one outta four was perfect. The rest was some magical patchwork by my finisher. The other's weren't bad, but like I said, not perfect. I'm confident if I were to do it again, I could make all four perfect. I hadn't done an inlay like this before and it did take a few tries to fine tune the process
    "Do, or do not. There is no try."
    -Yoda



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Spitting distance north of Detroit Michigan
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    3,798
    Cool look!
    The perception of perfection is perfectly clear to everyone else

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