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Thread: Salt Box tutorial part 1

  1. #1
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    Salt Box tutorial part 1

    Ok guys and gals...sorry for the delay...my health can't decide what it wants to do. In part 1, we'll look at wood selection, cuts, dimensions, tenons and coring. Part 2 will deal with attaching the two parts and some ideas on finishing. So here we go!

    What kind of wood should you use? Let's re-phrase that...what kind shouldn't you use?
    1) Anything with scent - it will impart to your salt and that may not work.
    2) Woods that change color with light like Purple Heart. These woods are full of oxidants that can breakdown your salt...we don't want wet salt.
    3) woods that have lots of holes. Ambrosia maple is ok, but you need to fill the holes and CA has a crappy smell. If it's only one or two...ok, but try to keep it to a minimum.
    4) Nothing oily Stay away from the likes of Cocobolo and Teak.
    A good size seems to be in the 4" to 6" range. It really depends on who it's for. If they're in the kitchen all the time...bigger is better, by the same tokin, if it's someone that only cooks on the weekends, 4" is great.

    Some good ones are English walnut, Oaks, Maples, Cherry and so on.

    OK..let's turn something!! Hog cuts are fine. I use a 1 1/4" Spindle gouge to knock it down fast, After that...bowl gouge, scraper...whatever suits you needs

    Pic #1 Roughing out a Cherry block. Try to start with a 4" tall x 6" wide block. Even better if you can get it cut round!
    Pic #2 All roughed out. No need to make it pretty at this point.
    Pic #3 Pencil lines added to locate a few things. I've already made the tenon for the base.
    Pic #4 Smal parting line at lid and base. Making the tenon for the lid.
    Pic #7 Out of order...sorry. All split and ready to finish.
    Pic #5 Container chucked and ready to get messy.
    Pic #6 Notice I've defined the outer boarder. This one is about 1/2" Nothing exact...but it does need to be beefy. The magnet is 1/4"
    Now core to you hearts content. I like to leave 1/2" all around. More later!! Just PM me with any questions you have to this point!!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails rough out.jpg   rough out2.jpg   lines3.jpg   tenons4.jpg   chucked up.jpg  

    coring.jpg   split5.jpg  
    Last edited by Jim Burr; 04-04-2011 at 08:35 PM.
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Looks like fun I haven't turned anything in over a year and I have a chuck sitting in an unopened box. This will get me off my butt. My wife really liked the one you made for the swap and has asked me to make her one asap.

    Thanks Jim
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Well so far I can get this far. I only have one problem, seem to be only able to make boxes for angels, they all sprout wings and fly off of the lathe!!
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  4. #4
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    Terrific tutorial Jim, and as I said in another thread, I love a salt box--I've been using one for years.

    The one I have from France (where I used to live) doesn't have a cover that comes off. It has a permanent decorative thing/finial on top instead. It's the shape of yours, but taller, and there's an opening on the side big enough to stick your hand in--so it's always open.
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
    AKA The Rookie

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cynthia White View Post
    The one I have from France (where I used to live) doesn't have a cover that comes off. It has a permanent decorative thing/finial on top instead. It's the shape of yours, but taller, and there's an opening on the side big enough to stick your hand in--so it's always open.
    Doesn't that create problems when canning or boiling? Or what is the appropriate place for a salt box? While I am asking, do they make them primarily for salt or are there other spices used in an amount that would promote them to be in their individual box??
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Shively View Post
    Doesn't that create problems when canning or boiling? Or what is the appropriate place for a salt box? While I am asking, do they make them primarily for salt or are there other spices used in an amount that would promote them to be in their individual box??
    I'm not sure what you mean by "problems". I never had a problem with it, and I do a lot of cooking. I keep about a tsp of uncooked rice in a little piece of cheesecloth in there because of humidity so the salt doesn't stick together. I can't show you a photo of mine right now because it's still boxed up with a lot of my kitchen stuff. But here are some photos of old-fashioned salt boxes. You'll notice that several of them don't have covers. I keep mine on the kitchen counter right next to the stove. (or behind the stove in one house, where I had room--the cooktop was in a corner so there was lots of room behind it). That's the best place for it, because you reach into it for coarse salt when you're making soups or stews on the stove. j

    It's a great gift for anyone who likes cooking.
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
    AKA The Rookie

  7. #7
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    Here's one I made a few years ago. I still use it every day, but I'm not happy with the hinge mechanism at all...

    I use kosher salt in mine, because it's got bigger flakes, is easier to grab a pinch, and has less sodium per pinch than table salt (Because of the flake size and slightly less dense nature).

    That's why I want to see how Jim did his!

    Lame Salt Cellar


  8. #8
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    Thanks for the answers Cynthia. You answered it without knowing I was wondering about humidity in the air/room when cooking.

    Brent, yours looks like it swings like Jim's. Be interested to learn what the differences are if any.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  9. #9
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    Mine is just a screw with the head cut off. If you turn the top the wrong way it will come right off, and someday the hole will wear out...

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