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Thread: Holster shaping

  1. #1
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    Holster shaping

    Thought I'd try my hand at some leather work. I couldn't find my leather sewing awl or hole punch. I had picked up a bag of rivets and some clips a couple of weekends ago at the Tandy leather store, so I ended up just riveting all of it instead.


    It's a little over sized. So I'm thinking about giving it a really quick boil to shrink it and stiffen it a bit. Anyone had any luck doing this? Or should I just water soak it (cold) and shape it that way?


    I will be replacing the clips with "J" clips, as the ones I used don't hold the holster on my belt well enough when drawing.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails tn_IMG_20110402_224443.jpg   tn_IMG_20110402_224510.jpg  
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  2. #2
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    Darren,
    I've never boiled leather but in the past when ever I made a holster I would soak the leather, wrap the piece in seran wrap to keep it dry, then I would wrap the leather around the piece and secure it in place with duct tale. That way the leather would conform the the piece.
    JMHO
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    Thanks Don! Just curious, by doing it cold, did it stiffen the leather at all?
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  4. #4
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    yes it does but if you use vergtable oil cured leather (tooling oil) then it is easy to bring back with needsfoot oil.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
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    Darren, what about cutting out a wooden shape of the gun so the gun does not get compromised in the least? (I would sleep better if it were me making a holster!) Cool idea, neat suggestions Don.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Shively View Post
    Darren, what about cutting out a wooden shape of the gun so the gun does not get compromised in the least? (I would sleep better if it were me making a holster!) Cool idea, neat suggestions Don.
    Or maybe a blue plastic gun?

    http://www.midwayusa.com/browse/Brow...ystring=655***

    But for one holster, I wouldn't have a problem oiling the gun really well, putting it in plastic and forming it.

  7. #7
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    I've done a few of these and never had a problem but ya gotta do what ya gotta do
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
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    I won't be doing any production runs of these, just thought I'd try doing my own before spending money ($30 - $70) for one since I had the leather around. I think I've got about $10 in it so far. I'll at least double bag it. Since it's an IWB (inside waist band) holster, the gun will probably get wetter from me than this.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  9. #9
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    The holsters I have made were deliberately undersized the soaked and the gun inserted so the leather can shape as it dries.
    Most of the time I drill my holes on the drill press, makes stitching quick and easy. Rivets or Chicago screws are used on corners where there might be stress.
    If you get a beveling tool (cheap and last forever) you will find the edges will look a whole bunch nicer, gives the whole thing a 'finished' look.
    Making yer own is always a better way to go. It is how you want it, costs less and there is pride in what you did. Ye earned a
    "Folks is funny critters."

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    The holsters I have made were deliberately undersized the soaked and the gun inserted so the leather can shape as it dries.
    Most of the time I drill my holes on the drill press, makes stitching quick and easy. Rivets or Chicago screws are used on corners where there might be stress.
    If you get a beveling tool (cheap and last forever) you will find the edges will look a whole bunch nicer, gives the whole thing a 'finished' look.
    Making yer own is always a better way to go. It is how you want it, costs less and there is pride in what you did. Ye earned a
    Thanks Frank. Yeah, I did use the drill press for doing the rivet holes. Was a bit hesitant at first to do that, but with the small drill bit it really didn't drill any differently than wood. I did us a piece of scrap wood for a backer when drilling also. I'll be heading over to Tandy again this weekend, will have to pickup the beveling too, probably a new stitching awl too since I can't find my other one...that will make it show up.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

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