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Thread: Elementary Router Table Fence Questions

  1. #1
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    Elementary Router Table Fence Questions

    There are several things I don't understand about router table fences.

    1. If you build your own fence, how do you move it closer/further from the bit with any degree of precision or accuracy.

    2. and then if you buy a "fence" like this, do you still need a taller fence in front it or is that tall enough? (it doesn't look that tall to me)?

    3. What about this kind of fence? How does that move toward or away from the bit?

    4. Or this one? How does it move on the table?
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  2. #2
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    A router table and fence can be as simple as a router bolted to a piece of plywood, over a trash can, with a jointed 2x4 clamped to the ply as a fence. Clamp one side down, loosen the other and 'tap' the board till it's where you need it.

    There's one show I've seen on tv with a couple of Canadian gentlemen that use a fence system pretty similar to what I just described. It all really depends on what you are trying to do.

    I've got the Incra system and I really like it because of the micro adjustability and the repeatability of the cuts.

    If I was running something tall vertically along the fence, I'd probably clamp a flat piece of something to it to provide more vertical support, but that's not really been an issue yet.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
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  3. #3
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    1. If you build your own fence, how do you move it closer/further from the bit with any degree of precision or accuracy.
    I use setup blocks. On the rare occasion when I am trying to move a teeny bit from where I already am and tapping it with my knuckle is too uncontrolled, I use this:

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    There are commercial versions but you can make one really easily.

    2. and then if you buy a "fence" like this, do you still need a taller fence in front it or is that tall enough? (it doesn't look that tall to me)?
    I have several different faces that side onto my aluminum extrusion; stock, taller, deeper (for large diameter bits) and throw-aways that I cut a ZCI into for a certain maneuver.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    3. What about this kind of fence? How does that move toward or away from the bit?
    Mine runs in through-slots in the table.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cynthia White View Post
    There are several things I don't understand about router table fences.
    1. If you build your own fence, how do you move it closer/further from the bit with any degree of precision or accuracy.

    Um, you don't. There are all sorts of "techniques." I've tried many of them. So have most of the people reading this. Life's too short, and good wood is too expensive.

    2. and then if you buy a "fence" like this, do you still need a taller fence in front it or is that tall enough? (it doesn't look that tall to me)?

    Easy enough to clamp a temporary face to the fence. But you won't need it very often. Hardly ever. I can't remember doing it even once.

    3. What about this kind of fence? How does that move toward or away from the bit?

    On T-tracks, which you install into the table. I don't mean to be flip, but if you're spending that kind of money, just get the Incra. It's worth every penny, and then some.

    4. Or this one? How does it move on the table?

    That one slides across the side, like some table saw fences. I don't mean to be flip, but if you're spending that kind of money, just get the Incra. It's worth every penny, and then some.


    Thanks,

    Bill

  5. #5
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    Here is a router table & fence that I built with the help of my friend Carey.

    My only reason for posting this it to give you some ideas of what you could do for a little less money & in the process gain some experience & skills working in your shop. I had some help building this but I did a good share of the work myself. One of the best ways to gain experience is to build things for your shop to include router tables, cabinets, benches etc.

    Shots A & B show a straight on shot of the table with measuring tapes T-slots for clamping & movement of the fence as well as the miter slot & feather board T-slot.

    Shots C & D show the back & bottom side of the fence where you can see the DC hole & adjustment knobs as well as the bottom shot shows the
    T-bolts the make it possible to slide & clamp into the T-tracks.

    Shots E & F are just general shots of the table. shot G show the table extension I clamp on to rout wide panels.

    Shots H & I are shots of the router under the table & the last shot shows the switches for both the router table & Unisaw. The router is raised & lowered by a router raiser.

    This is what can be done with approximately $150 - $200 not counting the router of your choice.



    http://www.amazon.com/Rockler-Router...2469932&sr=1-3
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails router table A.jpg   router table B.jpg   router table C.jpg   router table D.jpg   router table E.jpg  

    router table F.jpg   router table G.jpg   router table H.jpg   router table I.jpg   1940 Delta Unisaw & router switch.jpg  

    Last edited by Bart Leetch; 04-10-2011 at 09:32 PM.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  6. #6
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    These shots is what I did with $20 garage sale Rockler RT top & a promo router from Hitachi. In the pic it has a PC 690 under the top I hadn't received the Hitachi yet.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Rockler RT.jpg   Hitachi router post.jpg  
    Last edited by Bart Leetch; 04-10-2011 at 09:35 PM.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  7. #7
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    There are only two different types of fences. There are the one peice fence that goea from one end of the table to the other and have a spot notched out for the router bit(s). These are ok, but cat cuase problems as you can not close the gab and the bits. The other is a split fence. This hase two fences, one on the left and one on the right. these are great as you can adjust the gap deending on the size of the bit. They are also nice becuase some time you need to adjust the outfeed table like on a jointer to make different cuts.

    Most of the time tall fences are not needed. However if you do need one you can clamp them to your fence or you drill some holes and screw on the taller fence when neded.

  8. #8
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    The nice thing about the incra (Probably others as well) is that it's very easy to attach a sacrificial fence to it. You can then make your self a zero clearance fench...
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


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