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Thread: Most decorated soldier

  1. #1
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    Most decorated soldier

    Check this out he was nominated for the CMH three times.


    http://www.theveteranssite.com/click...ldier_0410_CTG

  2. #2
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    Definitely an American to be honored.
    However, maybe it is the way medals are counted. I dunno.
    But, there is an ongoing debate as to the most decorated American war hero of all time.
    Many say it was Audie Murphy.
    But, Arkansas, had a hero named Footsie Brit who, many claimed had more awards and decorations than Murphy.
    I met Footsie. Quite a guy, he lost an arm in WWII, ran for Governor and was genuinely likable. He was also a Medal of Honor recipient.
    BTW, nobody 'wins' a Medal of Honor, it is awarded.
    Doesn't matter who is #1. I salute them all.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    Definitely an American to be honored.

    Doesn't matter who is #1. I salute them all.

    Faith, Hope & Charity

  4. #4
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    I always hated that term, "most decorated" Not all medals are the same, but I am in awe of all the medal of honor winners, nominated soldiers, and even the ones considered based on their self sacrifice for others.

  5. #5
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    Just got off the phone with my son who is facing his 4th deployment in October and all I got to say is as one vet to another I salute you.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    I'm not really sure how to say this---so I may ramble a bit.

    I was in the service WWII. Practically all males of the correct age were also in the service. In addition to "regular people" we had a lot of thugs, bigots, thieves, etc. Even though I was in it, I did not have a particularly high opinion of the military.

    After my fourth retirement from my work, I ended up working an occasional day at an optometry office on Camp Pendleton (where I was stationed for a year during WWII). The difference on the base was absolutely amazing. The quality of the servicemen and women was/is like an upper echelon of humanity. The people are bright, polite, and go out of their way to help each other. I was so happy there that I went back to work full-time.

    Driving through the gate is like entering another world. A world where people obey the traffic laws, where they stop their cars and wait if it even looks like you want to cross the street.

    The great majority of the children are sharp and polite. It is not the least bit unusual for a 5 year old to come into the office for an eye exam by his/herself. They know why they are there, they know their health history, they make intelligent (adult) decisions during the exam, they behave. THEY ARE ALSO PROUD AND THEY PLAN TO GROW UP AND BECOME A MARINE.

    I am so darned proud of them. Unlike WWII the rotten apples are very few and far between...it is a shock to hear about a bad incident. They deserve to be treated better than they are.

    I will add something here that really cracked me up. I was driving along a back street on the base and I saw a group of ten or fifteen men, in uniform, trimming the oleanders (flowers if you are not familiar with the name). They were all carrying automatic rifles.

    Enjoy and be proud of our military personnel,

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 04-11-2011 at 04:54 AM.
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  7. #7
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    I salute all folks who serve now days. They volunteer for something I'd have second thoughts about.

    Jim, I had the opportunity to deer hunt at Camp Pendleton back in the day. I will agree that every one I met was top notch. Of course, being a girl, they took a second look at the test I took and double checked that I aced it. My partner missed three questions and they didn't bother to take a second look

    Hats off to all who serve

  8. #8
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    I met a guy last night who was watching the steelhead trout below a bridge. Friendly guy, missing both legs beneath the knees. I thought to thank him for his service to me and my country but figured he gets asked a lot about his double amputation. I wanted to ask him but I wondered if he gets tired of talking about it so I figured to just keep the conversation light and not bring it up. He mentioned that he was thinking about fishing but had not brought much in the way of bait. I dug some steelhead spawn bags out of my fishing kit and gave them to him. I have nothing but absolute respect for our returning veterans and an extra soft spot for those who have paid a dear price either in body or mind. I wish them all well and will go out of my way to help in any way possible. I worked with a lot of Viet Nam vets and saw a lot of wreckage in their lives. I hope this country appreciates this latest group of veterans and works hard to help them re-a climate to civilian life.
    I'm a certifiable tree hugger. (it's a poor mans way of determining DBH before cutting the tree down)

  9. #9
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    Chuck, thanks for sharing that with us. I am going to pass that along to some friends and relative.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Downes View Post
    I met a guy last night who was watching the steelhead trout below a bridge. Friendly guy, missing both legs beneath the knees. I thought to thank him for his service to me and my country but figured he gets asked a lot about his double amputation. I wanted to ask him but I wondered if he gets tired of talking about it so I figured to just keep the conversation light and not bring it up. He mentioned that he was thinking about fishing but had not brought much in the way of bait. I dug some steelhead spawn bags out of my fishing kit and gave them to him. I have nothing but absolute respect for our returning veterans and an extra soft spot for those who have paid a dear price either in body or mind. I wish them all well and will go out of my way to help in any way possible. I worked with a lot of Viet Nam vets and saw a lot of wreckage in their lives. I hope this country appreciates this latest group of veterans and works hard to help them re-a climate to civilian life.

    I know how you feel. I never go past a serviceman without shaking his hand and thanking him.
    My son spends a lot of time at the VA hospital getting his injuries treated. He has also been diagnosed with PTSD. I sometimes drive him over or pick him up and it's so troubling to see all the men and women there that sacrificed so much. I usually bring a few dozen donuts over and leave them in the lounge for the Vets as well as volunteer to help with anything they may need.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

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