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Thread: a few questions for whoever can answer them

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    a few questions for whoever can answer them

    Although Ive run a business since the late 70s, Ive never thought about woodworking and all involved.

    It seems my 4 year run at having a shop in my garage might be coming to and end soon. I was angry today all day, but the anger has passed, and now my wife and I are putting our heads together to come up with ideas.

    I can use my sons home/garage, but hes 45 minutes away, and he only has around 240 sq feet. Adequate enough for me to finish his builds for now, I can move anything I need to his garage in one load, set up and get busy within 2 hours. I dont want to have to move alot of lumber, and all the secondary machines since I dont use them often. My son said anytime dad, hes a good boy. Advantages of this is that I will have a full kitchen, my own bathroom, a bed to rest in, and always feel at home. This would only be temporary, as I wouldnt want to displace my son out of his storage space in the garage. I just want to finish his table, stools, and help him finish off his basement. Id move on a sunday morning, and be working by sunday afternoon.

    now my questions, as it pertains to my second option and the one my wife wants me to follow as well.
    Renting space. If I rent space to put 6 machines in, strictly personal use, not commercial, does anyone know if Im still bound by the same fire codes and electrical codes as a professional business?
    There will be no one other than me, so I dont need liability insurance, maybe a drop of renters theft insurance.
    Are there any rules about setting up a woodworking shop that Im totally not aware off?
    Im thinking about finding out about local machine and woodworking shops that could spare an extra loading bay, and rent it to me to help them pay their monthly rent. Id get a small insurance policy to protect me All Id need is 250-300 sq feet, and a throne. I only eat a coffee and roll, so I can make coffee and bring rolls each day.
    I do like this idea, although its a bit more convenient stayin out back, but that may not be an option in two weeks. At least I wont have prying eyes and curious neighbors looking down my way anymore.

    I checked some local places and I see some 600 sq places for 650-700 bucks a month with loading docks, frieght elevators, private bathrooms, perfect for me.

    If I ever needed advice from you guys, please, spit it all out and give me ideas now. There are share/places around me, but I dont want to work on their machines and dont want others using mine.Id prefer my own space.
    Any suggestions, please pm me or give it to me hear.
    It will be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    I'm by no means an expert on this, but I'd think the fire and electrical codes would be the same for a commercial or a private shop, regardless of the location. In other words, I think the codes that would apply at a rented shop space would be the same ones you currently have to comply with in your garage shop. The only difference is the code enforcement on a rented commercial space might be more rigidly enforced that a home shop, and it'd be more likely to get the attention of the local inspection agency. But as you've already seen, apparently even your house isn't safe from those guys.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Kemah, Tx. - Houston Suburb
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    Before my current location in a commercial shop building, I was using mini-storage buildings. I wasn't the only one. One guy had a full blown cabinet making business in 5 or 6 bays adjacent to eachother. The last mini-storage location I had, I was paying $300/mo. total for 2 12X36 bays with high ceilings. Some places are a lot less. No one will know or care that you are running a wood shop in a mini-storage bay except the owner. THEY definitly need to know up front. I have done this several times and was never turned down.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Villa Park, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Bilello View Post
    Before my current location in a commercial shop building, I was using mini-storage buildings. I wasn't the only one. One guy had a full blown cabinet making business in 5 or 6 bays adjacent to eachother. The last mini-storage location I had, I was paying $300/mo. total for 2 12X36 bays with high ceilings. Some places are a lot less. No one will know or care that you are running a wood shop in a mini-storage bay except the owner. THEY definitly need to know up front. I have done this several times and was never turned down.
    How do you get power into those bays? I thought all they came with are a couple of lights.

    Will the power company run a line to one or more bays. I'm sure the owner would not let you tap into their power.

    Mike
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Red Feather Lakes, CO
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    Allen, I would try to talk to them. I would explain that you are just a little OCD about your shop and include the thing about your health and just trying to get in as much as you can while you can. Sometimes that is all it it takes. If it worked you would save yourself the trouble of finding another place, the moving and the money. If it didn't work, well, then you didn't lose anything that you weren't going to lose anyway. Of course I don't know the specifics but I have always been one to buck heads. I have a hard head so it doesn't hurt much.
    Sure sounds like a bad situation and I don't don't envy you right now. That is why I moved to the mountains, so I didn't have to shoot any of my neighbors or fight with any inspectors. We have one main one that does the inspections up here.
    It wasn't a party unless it involved fire, an ATV, a chain saw and whiskey.

  6. #6
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    Allen, I agree with Mark, wait until Monday and then go and go through the process to let these idiots know that you are a hociest and have no intention of doing commercial work.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
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    I tried to explain things.
    Seems they arent going to believe me no matter what.
    1000 bf of lumber assorted by species in storage and things like fire extinquishers hung up on walls, doesnt let them think Im an amateur with alot of stock and safety minded.
    They made up their mind. I have stress issues. It totally shut my eyes off today. I can go on with them, and on, and on, it just might not be worth it at this point.
    I will have my time with the judge, but Im not sure how hell see things.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    I'm wondering who the burden of proof fall on. Do you have to prove you're just a hobbyist or to they have to prove you're pro?
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Floydada, Tx
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    Allen, have you looked for ww cops in your eare? If you could find one it could be worth it. I was going to start one in my last shop befor the bottom fell out. In my area once you rent a place for doing ww they get the fire marshall involed and they want everything up to there standards. Hopefully if you go ths route you can get away with out having to follow all the regulations. If you lived closer I wuld let you come over and use my shop. Good luck with this and I hope everything works out.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
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    Is it the noise that they are concerned about or is it that they think you are running a commercial business out of your garage ?

    I would think it would be fairly easy to prove that you are not running a ww business in your garage? What does your lawyer say.?
    Faith, Hope & Charity

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