Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Issue with bowl finish

  1. #1

    Issue with bowl finish

    I was at a show yesterday selling some of my work. It started to rain pretty hard. Before we could get the sides down on the gazebo, some of my bowls got wet. When the rain stopped, we got some towels and wiped them off. However, there where whitish spots on the bowls.

    I finished the bowls with danish oil. Once dry, I buffed them with tripole then carnuba wax.

    My question is what are they, and how to get rid of them?
    Come visit me at WoodChux and see my work, get free woodworking plans.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    That's a bummer. Carnauba wax is famous for showing white water spots, although I'm not sure why it happens. I believe the only way to get rid of them is to remove the wax with mineral spirits and re-do the buffing.

    The water spotting (and general lack of durability) are why I don't use carnauba anymore. I use Renaissance Wax instead.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Hardinsburg, KY
    Posts
    277
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    The water spotting (and general lack of durability) are why I don't use carnauba anymore. I use Renaissance Wax instead.
    I totally agree with Vaughn. Carnauba is terrible. Renaissance is the way to go. If you run out or can't find it, Johnson's Floor wax is the next best thing out there. In fact, it is what I'm using right now. Can't find my Ren Wax since the move.
    Working flat so I can play round,
    Doug Miller

    Repentance Is The
    Prerequisite For
    Gods Forgiveness

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    Hi,

    Watch out with Johnson's Floor Wax. There are two (2) varieties: non-skid and regular. I have not used the non-skid.

    The regular is slippery as Teflon and buffs to a very nice shine. It really works wonderfully well on table saw, band saw, etc. tables. It prevents rust and is almost frictionless for sliding large pieces of wood across.

    Maybe non-skid buffs up well also. I just don't know. I was just giving a "heads-up."

    Enjoy,

    Jim

    If anyone uses the non-skid let us know how it works.
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    I've heard of others who've used Kiwi neutral shoe polish (the paste, not the liquid) as another substitute for Renaissance Wax.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
    Thanks for all the help guys. I'll give the Ren Wax a try. Thanks again.
    Come visit me at WoodChux and see my work, get free woodworking plans.

Similar Threads

  1. Another project with a finish issue
    By Dan Mosley in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-07-2010, 07:15 AM
  2. PM 3520b Bowl Rest Quality Control Issue?
    By Rich Boehlke in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-17-2009, 04:07 AM
  3. Bowl #11 - Almost done - not sure whether to finish or not ...
    By John Bartley in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 12-03-2007, 04:47 AM
  4. Salad bowl finish
    By Kenneth Lasota in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-30-2007, 02:30 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •