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Thread: Panasonic Drill batteries ???

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Panasonic Drill batteries ???

    Stu's new driver and all the discussions on batteries found me looking for new batteries for my Panasonic 15.6v

    But after checking out Jims place and Amazon, I guess this drill is going corded alla Nikki style.

    New drill with 2 batt = $199 + shipping and our 13% taxes

    New replacement two battries = $126 + shipping plus taxes

    Replacement batt from Jims AVL = $114 + shipping plus taxes


    Its quiet true dont make sense to buy new batteries at this price.


    Its not as if the drill is still new its had fair wear. I am thinking of taking battery packs apart looking for a small 12 switching supply to fit into the empty battery case and attach the power cord to the battery case.

    But it will all have to wait its not high on the totem pole of priorities now.


    But then again checked in with CPO and who can beat this kind of deal for a Makita 18V lithium ion @ $59 with warranty.
    Last edited by Rob Keeble; 06-21-2011 at 04:17 AM.
    cheers

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    ...But then again checked in with CPO and who can beat this kind of deal for a Makita 18V lithium ion @ $59 with warranty.
    That's for the tool only, Rob. It comes with no battery or charger. Still, I've found it better deal to buy a refurbished tool and two batteries from CPO or ReconditionedTools.com than it is to buy a single new battery.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
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    If you can take the battery packs apart easily enough, you can rebuild them. They all take "sub C" cells that are 1.2 volts each. You solder them in series to get more volts. That's why all drills that used NiCad or NiMh like yours are all multiples of 1.2 (9.6v, 12v, 14.4v, etc.). I've rebuilt my Milwaukee 14.4v packs twice now. The drill is still going strong after about 25 years.
    You can get cheap cells (either old or off-brand) that are notorious for not performing to spec (low voltage or shy on the amp-hours). I don't mess with those. I've always bought Sanyo or Panasonic cells. From what i've read, you can't go wrong with those. You can get them with or without the solder tabs. I get them with the solder tabs so that i can connect them in series without heat damaging the inner workings of the cells. It's been several years since i did it last, but i recall it was cheaper than buying them new, cheaper than replacing the drill, and cheaper than having them rebuilt by someone else with off-brand cells.
    It took a couple of hours start to finish to rebuild two battery packs. In doing so, i also upgraded my packs from 1.6 amp hours to 2.2 amp hours. They've worked great. When they die (and it's been about 4 years now since i rebuilt them last), i'll probably rebuild them again as long as the drill seems sound.
    Google "panasonic sub c cells" or "sanyo sub c cells" and see where you can get the best deal.
    This approach isn't for everyone, but if you've got a soldering iron or gun and a free evening, you can save some bucks.
    paulh

  4. #4
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    Ooops Thanks for checking there Vaughn. I was sold without checking lucky for me when i went to order they dont allow paypal payments from outside the USA so i cancelled my order. (phew i would have looked like a real fool with another tool and no batteries) What my Dad say....Act in haste repent at your leisure. Still do it no matter how many times i hear it in my head.


    Paul, I hear you but so you know soldering the tops of the batteries has got to be done carefully.

    There are good reasons they spot weld the tags on and the manner in which the spot weld head is designed. If done properly very little heat is transfered to the cell and the welding current flows throught the top of the tag nickle and happens very quick.

    In my past when messing with doing what you doing, to get the tabs they use here to take solder it gets real hot on the top of the battery. This is not good for these technologies.

    No i think new drill is the answer and corded old drill the solution too. But each to his own. Keep safe.
    cheers

  5. #5
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    Rob,
    I hear you, but i've not had any problems after rebuilding a handfull of battery packs. The solder tabs are there to make the electrical connection without transfering damaging heat to the cell itself.
    At any rate, it's hard to go wrong with buying a new one. In fact, i wouldn't mind if my 14.4 vold Milwaukee gave up the ghost - i'd switch to the lighter Lithium Ion technology. But, the drill has been hard to kill. I'll probably be using it for many years and a battery pack rebuild or two yet to come.
    paulh

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