Page 1 of 12 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 116

Thread: New Roubo Style Bench

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807

    New Roubo Style Bench

    After some time with the workbench/SawStop set up I built a while back, I've decided that it just don't work.

    Here you can see the old set up.....



    I thought this was a good idea at the time, I was wrong, it does not work well.

    It is too big, it takes up too much space, and I can only work from one side of the workbench, and each time I want to use the saw, I have to clear the whole thing off, don't work well...

    I decided that I want the saw turned so the cutting direction is on the long axis of the workshop and I want a separate workbench.





    I trimmed the rails down to 162cm/63" this should be an OK width, I had to cut down the extension table with the router insert as well.

    One of the other reasons I was doing this was the DC on the SawStop just did not work well, I figured with a direct shot to the saw from the 6" hose it would work better, I'm sure it will, as this is what I found in the 4" DC pipe next to the saw.....



    Yep, that pile of dust

    No wonder the DC sucked on the saw

    I have the SawStop basically done, now I need to buy the wood to make my workbench.

    I'm going to make a Roubu or French workbench as described by Christopher Schwarz in his "The Workbench Book", like this......



    He recommends Southern Yellow Pine, but I cannot find it here, to make a truly heavy duty bench out of say Maple here would cost me a lot, a WHOLE lot.
    One wood that is close to SYP is Douglas Fir, and I found some!!



    These are meant to be ridge beams, the top ones in this stack are 4" x 6" by 13' long and cost about $50 each, I think my workbench should be about 24" wide, so 4 of these beams laid side by side will be close to that, and a squared off piece for each leg, I should be good to go!

    Should be quite the bench......
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    2,668
    Stu, I will be watching your progress with great interest. Hope to learn a lot from your experience.
    Chinese Proverb: Man who eats many prunes gets good run for the money.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,076
    This will be a great thread. I was considering doing something a lot like your old setup to replace my cobbled outfeed. Can you elaborate a little on what you were dissatisfied with? I notice the bench you are after is targeting hand tools. Is that what made the other bench unworkable? I look forward to tagging along for the ride ;-)
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Santa Claus, In
    Posts
    4,779
    Pressure, I feel pressure from this.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,260
    Make it good and heavy. Thats what mine lacks is heft. I threw out four old discs a month or two ago now i wish i had found a way to secure them to my bench to add heft.


    The other thing is i am not convinced the leg vice is the greatest invention. But maybe its just me.

    Funny thing is i am in the same camp as Glenn. You had me convinced your way was a way to go to get back some shop space given i have the items separate.

    But now you mention the aspect of clearing the work bench to use the saw well its bad enough i use my saw as additional workbench space so i guess you saved me a whole ton of grief.

    Are we woodworkers ever happy.
    cheers

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    Looking forward to following along on the bench build.

    Stu, why do you suspect the DC wasn't clearing that 4" line? I'd think your DC (heck, even mine) could keep swarf like that from building up. Was there some other obstruction in the line?
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,604
    Lurking and Learning
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
    Posts
    5,533
    well, having learned the limitations, I'm sure you'll enjoy building and using your new bench! Still, that was an impressive set-up, too bad it didn't work as you thought!
    -Ned

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Southwood View Post
    Pressure, I feel pressure from this.
    Steve, please don't, it will be some time until I'm ready to flatten the top of my bench!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    This will be a great thread. I was considering doing something a lot like your old setup to replace my cobbled outfeed. Can you elaborate a little on what you were dissatisfied with? I notice the bench you are after is targeting hand tools. Is that what made the other bench unworkable? I look forward to tagging along for the ride ;-)
    The table/saw combo dominated my small space, I could not work around it, it was always in the way. As a tablesaw it worked OK, but, when I wanted to cut anything long, like ripping a long board, it was quite the process to turn the saw 90 degrees to do so. I have the Festool tracksaw to break down sheet goods, so I don't need that kind of huge table saw combo.

    As a bench, it worked only OK, the biggest problem was I could only access what I was working on from one side, the table bench was too wide The leg vice and the regular vice worked well, and the dog holes with the hold fasts were great, but not enough space to work on stuff. Also I could not flatten the top of the bench when it was attached to the saw, this was frustrating, as the bench was not as flat as I wanted it to be.

    I am moving more to hand tools, and smaller work, but I will be doing some cabinet work too, so having a more flexible work space is really important. with a separate bench and tablesaw set up I should get this. I will also need some more roller stands and I'll need to cull the junk out of the shop too.

    I have a potential big customer for some work over the summer, so I had to get this done.

    I cobbled this together from the remnants of the back bench I had built on to the saw....


    .... as I know the often stated lament of guys building a bench is that you need a workbench to build a workbench!

    I think I'll even stick my vice on this thing, just so I have a vice to use, it will be top heavy, but should work OK for a temp bench.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

Similar Threads

  1. An Interesting Bench in the Federal Style.
    By Dave Richards in forum Designs, Plans and Sketches
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-31-2013, 12:16 AM
  2. The Roubo Bench Again
    By Stuart Ablett in forum Handtool Project Showcase
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-27-2012, 01:16 AM
  3. Roubo Workbench
    By Dennis Ulrich in forum Handtool Project Showcase
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-11-2012, 03:32 AM
  4. Roubo bookstand
    By Roger Newby in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-10-2012, 06:05 PM
  5. Mission Style Bench
    By scott spencer in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-24-2008, 05:02 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •