Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Cordless drill work

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
    Posts
    5,719

    Cordless drill work

    So apparantley I need to buy a new drill. Or do I??

    I needed to drill four 7/8" holes about 3.5" deep to put some legs in a solid maple log that I'd squared up with a chainsaw and power sanders. I had a spade bit that I wanted to use to get it started then I would move onto a forstner bit. Tried all 3 of my drills and none of them had enough power to do much of anything. I needed to get the holes drilled last night as I'm delivering the table tonight...first thought was to call my dad, but it was already 9pm and I didn't want to bother him...only other option was a brace and bit that came with my grandpa's toolchest. I looked at the bit marked 14 and it was just about a perfect match for a 7/8" bit...tried it and within 45 minutes I had each hole drilled!! Good thing KP put the bits away sharpened!! (over 20yrs ago )

    The table is for a friend that will use it for a plant stand...it is about 30" tall altogether and 15" square...yes it is heavy! My arm is tired, but I'm glad I had a "cordless drill" around!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails p_00295.jpg   p_00293.jpg  
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,604
    Portable tools are great
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    When you use brace and bit, the number on the bit is it's diameter in 1/16 th inch increments. A #4 is four-sixteenths of an inch in diameter or 1/4 inch. A #8 is eight-sixteenths or 1/2 inch and, guess what, a #14 is fourteen-sixteenths of an inch or 7/8 inch.

    When I was a kid, you were riding high on the hog when you had a full set of bits up through one-inch. These bits were also quite common in the military during the WWII era. I don't know when they started being phased out. I remember I thought a spade bit was a fantastic invention.

    Enjoy,

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 06-28-2011 at 10:19 PM. Reason: Add a sentance
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
    Posts
    5,719
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    When you use brace and bit, the number on the bit is it's diameter in 1/16 th inch increments. A #4 is four-sixteenths of an inch in diameter or 1/4 inch. A #8 is eight-sixteenths or 1/2 inch and, guess what, a #14 is fourteen-sixteenths of an inch or 7/8 inch.

    When I was a kid, you were riding high on the hog when you had a full set of bits up through one-inch. These bits were also quite common in the military during the WWII era. I don't know when they started being phased out. I remember I thought a spade bit was a fantastic invention.

    Enjoy,

    Jim
    Jim thanks for the info.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833
    Good post and good info.
    Glad you got the job done.
    I have a couple B&Bs and reach for them once or twice a year when nothing else will do the job.
    I have one bit welded to a rod almost 3' long. For what special task I had that made up for has long been forgotten. But, whatever it was couldn't have been done any other way.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
    Posts
    5,719
    So my friend said she wanted it to be 30" high, but changed her mind so I cut the legs down to 6" making it right at 26"high. Looks better if you ask me (she agreed) and it is more stable too. Still quite heavy though.

    I've got some similar projects coming up and I'm thinking the bit and brace is the way to go in the future. (or until I can save up some $$ for a big drill and long/big bits.)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails p_00296.jpg  
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
    Posts
    6,099
    I didn't know the relation of the number to the size, thanks Jim!
    Jeff, you used THE ORIGINAL CORDLESS drill!!!! Sharp bits, it is amazing the work they can do easily. That is why all those old guys were thin!!
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,322
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Shively View Post
    I didn't know the relation of the number to the size, thanks Jim!
    Jeff, you used THE ORIGINAL CORDLESS drill!!!! Sharp bits, it is amazing the work they can do easily. That is why all those old guys were thin!!
    Another 'trick:' The lead screw pulls the bit through the wood. If you know the tpi of the lead screw (they vary, depending on whether intended for use in soft or hard woods) you can guage hole depth by counting the turns of the brace, beginning when the cutting portion of the bit contacts the workpiece.

    I don't use mine a lot, but there are many times when they'll work better than any battery-powered drill.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Shively View Post
    Jeff, you used THE ORIGINAL CORDLESS drill!!!! Sharp bits, it is amazing the work they can do easily. That is why all those old guys were thin!!
    I just knew that somewhere out there I had an excuse for being a scrawny guy. The military service was a bit more polite (if you can believe that), they said I was wiry.

    Enjoy,

    Jim
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  10. #10
    Jeff,
    just wait until you chuck a screwdriver bit into that brace and drive some screws. You simply won't believe the control and the unbelievable amount of torque you can generate. I remember doing that with my son when we built a doghouse for his dog. He wanted to use my cordless B&D and I gave him the brace. He thought he was being punished until he drove just one screw. Then he started giggling at how much power he had.

Similar Threads

  1. Doh! I Shoulda Used a Cordless Drill
    By Vaughn McMillan in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-13-2009, 04:30 PM
  2. Looking for a Deal on a cordless Drill
    By Brent Dowell in forum New Tools
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 06-01-2009, 04:25 PM
  3. If you could buy any cordless drill, which would it be?
    By Mike Heidrick in forum New Tools
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 12-15-2008, 12:12 PM
  4. Skil 14.4 cordless drill
    By Dennis Thompson in forum New Tools
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-01-2007, 11:18 PM
  5. Cordless Drill Bit Storage
    By Dan Lee in forum Jigs and Fixtures
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-13-2007, 06:08 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •