Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Re-assembling some old chairs - Glue Question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,360

    Re-assembling some old chairs - Glue Question

    co, We've got some old Duncan Phyfe chairs. The table and chairs did belong to Sharons family. But they have been pretty thoroughly abused over the years. Most of the chairs succumbed to glue failure some time ago. I took them apart and put them in a box.

    We are thinking that gee, until I get my infamous maple table and chairs put together, I might as well re-assemble some of these. Might make it easier to get rid of the table someday as well if it came with more than just 2 chairs.

    My questions are;

    • What is the best way to clean up the old glue from the dowel holes?
    • In the attached picture you can see that some of the joings 'mesh' together. Anything to do to clean the glue up there?
    • What kind of refinishing options should I consider? Right now I'm thinking just a wipe down with murphy's oil soap and leave it be.


    Thanks in advance!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	FWW-4204.jpg 
Views:	43 
Size:	109.4 KB 
ID:	57634
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Villa Park, CA
    Posts
    1,407
    If the dowels are broken off, I drill them out to the next larger size, then glue up with epoxy.

    Mike
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,360
    The dowels pretty much fell out. There might be a few places where there is some wood in there, but the glue failure was just about 100%
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,360
    Found the perfect tool for scraping out the old glue from the grooves...

    (my narrow parting tool for turning)

    Well, Seems like mechanical means is best for getting rid of the old hide glue. What little was there was all crusty and dry and scraped off easily.

    I don't have any suitable epoxy right now, so I think I'll just glue up the first one with some regular titebond.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Villa Park, CA
    Posts
    1,407
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    The dowels pretty much fell out. There might be a few places where there is some wood in there, but the glue failure was just about 100%
    I'd still drill them out the next larger size so that you're gluing to fresh wood. Also, I find that the original size dowel is usually pretty loose in the old hole.

    Mike
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  6. #6
    I just did that with a set of chairs brought to me by a guy at work. The solution was to do exactly what Mike suggests: drill out the holes and use the next larger dowel and epoxy them together.

    Glue failure wasn't the total reason for the joints' failure. Over time and with the racking forces that chairs inevitably have to face, the holes themselves get widened. Glue alone doesn't bridge gaps very well, with the possibly exception of epoxy, so just re-gluing the dowels isn't going to last very long. There are only two solutions that will last longer than what you have: larger dowels and routing mortises into both rails and legs and use floating tenons.

    The reason to use epoxy is, as Bob Smalser has so definitely demonstrated, epoxy glues very well to itself in the event the joint needs to be reglued.

    Now, as to the corner braces, I made a jig to clean up the slots of the braces on the table saw. It beat the dickens out of scraping those slots by hand. The slots on the rails, well, those had to be scraped by hand just because I couldn't think of another way. I glued those with liquid hide glue.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,360
    Good advice guys.

    I'll pick up some larger dowels and 30 minute epoxy next time I go to town!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  8. #8
    By the way, Brent,

    make sure you get some good hardwood dowels. The ones I found locally were poplar, and those just won't last very well. Hold out for maple, birch or oak. I got mine at Rockler (but then there is a Rockler store about an hour from me).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,828
    Bruce said:
    Over time and with the racking forces that chairs inevitably have to face, the holes themselves get widened.
    Yes, very important to realize during the repair process. I have repaired/restored a number of old chairs. I use regular Titebond. But, I find the manufactured dowels work best. They tend to swell into place and hold well. But, I often also cross-pin the dowels with round toothpicks. Works for me.
    One caveat: Don't use Gorilla glue. DAMHIK
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    So. Florida
    Posts
    268
    Chair repair can be very tricky. I've found that if the fitting parts are close enough, but with a very small gap, just reusing the parts with a two part epoxy makes for a good joint. In trying to clean up glue, its possible to change the fit with inordinate excavation. IOW, the parts no longer are close fitting.

    Drilling out to the next larger size hole can be problematic. Dowels come in certain sizes. The next size larger may be to large for the joint area. Other considerations include whether the drill angle is correct. Many repair holes require an angle fitting dowel, that may be difficult to do by hand, or for some to configure with a drill press.





    .

Similar Threads

  1. Cyanoacrylate glue vs super/krazy glue, loctite glue, etc
    By Mike Gager in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 10-20-2016, 09:53 PM
  2. Glue question
    By Tom Niemi in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-04-2015, 06:27 PM
  3. glue up chairs
    By Dave Hawksford in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-09-2014, 04:02 PM
  4. Glue question?
    By larry merlau in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-18-2010, 04:46 AM
  5. Glue & chairs
    By ken lutes in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-27-2008, 01:00 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •