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Thread: Leave it to (Superman) Bradley

  1. #1
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    Leave it to (Superman) Bradley

    I have been using Johnson Floor Wax for over 70 years. However, today, Johnson and Bradley had a different experience. I made a mallet for Glenn. I applied the wax as a finish. I was looking at the mallet and while doing so I reached over to the side, placed the lid to the Johnson Wax on the can and pushed it down to close the can. I have a tendency to do two things at once.

    Well, being related to Superman, I pushed the lid right on down through the hole into the wax. The lid acted like a king-size ice cream scoop and piled all of the wax on top of the lid, which was now at the bottom of the can.

    By Golly I am sure strong for a 119 pound guy.

    If someone had taken a movie of that, I would have posted it.

    In the enclosed pic, you will notice that I left a proud lump when sawing off the tenon. I used a sharp chisel and pared the lump down to flush so Glenn could stand the mallet on end if he wished. Was there a better way to remove the lump than what I did?

    Enjoy,

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 07-03-2011 at 05:29 AM. Reason: Add a pic and question
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
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  2. #2
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    Jim, it sounds like you might want to cut back on the upper body work at the gym, buddy.

    Regarding your question about the lump on the end of the mallet, how you did it is fine. I probably would have sawn if off close to the head with a flush-cut saw and removed any remaining bits with a powered sander.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  3. #3
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    What's with the rolls of Charmin in the shop, Jim? Got a digestive problem???
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    What's with the rolls of Charmin in the shop, Jim? Got a digestive problem???
    His response to this oughta be good . . .

    -------------------

    As to the mallet . . . That thing is beautiful. How about some pics of the build? How about a thread titled "Maple Mallet" so folks looking for mallets can find it with the search engine? (Sorry, that's just my preference for meaningful thread titles sneaking out)

    I didn't get to actually hold it in my hand yet. It was still on the lathe during my last visit. I secretly believe dad wanted to be the first to whack something with it and so came up with all sorts of creative delay tactics to not let me take the mallet home with me (yet).

    The blank was cut from a big hard maple beast about 4" x 12" x 40" IIRC. That "board" weighed more than I would have thought. Dad's old Delta 14" bandsaw cut through it like butter. The piece was turned on a small Delta lathe, the model of which I do not recall. Dad used his "Easy Wood" tools that he has slowly been acquiring. Even I can turn with those tools and I don't even know anything about it. The decorative dark rings were burned in by friction using a piece of scrap.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails MalletGLSanded 1.jpg  
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 07-03-2011 at 01:22 PM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  5. #5
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    Glenn we leave the posts with meaningful titles and loads of education to you.

    From Jim, well i enjoy superman posts

    Jim when and if after this comment you finally decide to give it to him test it out on his noggin first.

    But you do bring up a good point, where is the rest of that slab.

    You did say 12 inches wide right and 40 long. So i presume that meant there is approx 8 inches give or take by 40 lying around somewhere or did it all get turned down.


    Nice mallet Jim Dont forget to write a note on it something like

    "dear Glenn with loads of wax yours superman."
    cheers

  6. #6
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    That's a pretty cool mallet Jim, Glenn will be very happy each time he uses it.

    I'm haven't see any mention to its weight, could you please tell us?

    Although I know that maple is a hard wood and I have worked with it, I don't know how does it perform as mallet. Does it have a tendency to crush or split in any way?

    I made a hammer handle from a maple scrap and it is great so I guess that even taking the blows it should perform well, or so I think
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  7. #7
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    could it be that those new marbles are taking effect?

    nice mallet jim!
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    What's with the rolls of Charmin in the shop, Jim? Got a digestive problem???
    I take a roll of paper towels and use the bandsaw to cut it into approximately three equal length sections and place them around the shop. I place about three rolls of TP in the shop also.

    WHY? Well, if I get a drop of glue on a finger or two, I grab a square of TP, wipe it off, toss it in the trash. If there is some grease on a mechanical part, I wipe it off with a section (usually about the size of a TP square) of paper towel because it is a heavier duty product.

    Typical uses: paint, finish, oil, grease, wiping down a tool, clean the rim of the paint can before closing (Man, I sure hope I don't shove one of those lids down through the opening of the can.), wipe off the paint stirring stick, yuck on the floor, etc., etc.

    Yeah, I have a digestive problem---I'm gluten intolerant (celiac) and it has wiped out the joy of eating out. Strangely to me: with all of the deserts, cookies, pie, turnovers, etc. the one thing I really miss is a good hard roll and butter.

    Enjoy,

    Jim
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toni Ciuraneta View Post
    That's a pretty cool mallet Jim, Glenn will be very happy each time he uses it.

    I'm haven't see any mention to its weight, could you please tell us?

    Although I know that maple is a hard wood and I have worked with it, I don't know how does it perform as mallet. Does it have a tendency to crush or split in any way?

    I made a hammer handle from a maple scrap and it is great so I guess that even taking the blows it should perform well, or so I think
    Since you asked so nice and pretty, I went down to the shop and got the mallet. I took it to Myrna's postal scale. Weight 1 lb. 9.6 oz.
    The stupid scale is on the antiquated Imperial measurement system with no way to convert to Metric measurement. My Chemistry and Physics Handbook says that 1 avoirdupois (imperial) ounce is equal to 28.349527 grams. One pound contains 16 ounces. Therefore:

    16.0 + 9.6 ounces equals: 25.6 ounces
    25.6 * 28.349527 equals: 725.74789 grams
    Close enough?

    Now since my brains have leaked out, I forgot the other questions you asked.

    I will post this, go back and look at your questions and then edit the answer into this post.

    Enjoy,

    Jim

    My answers: The wood is surprisingly heavy for its size. It is very dense, and the grain is very tight. To get better answers, let's hope that a member who really knows wood will chip in and tell both of us. I just know that it is used for mallets.
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 07-03-2011 at 09:22 PM. Reason: Add PS
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
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  10. #10
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    Toni,

    Isn't this the kind of thing (mallet) that you use when you do your sculpting?
    By cholking the handle you can deliver a blow that I would call, "On the heavy side of light." With your hand down near the end it is BBbbAAaaaMMMmmmmm!!!

    I have seen this type of thing (mallet) in various sizes. I have seen silversmiths using this type of mallet, about half this size, to "chase" silver. Chasing silver requires a light-moderate, accurate, repetitive blow.

    Enjoy,

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 07-03-2011 at 09:32 PM.
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
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