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Thread: My first real router table fence

  1. #1

    My first real router table fence

    Well I finally got around to building me a real router table fence. I was inspired by Glenn and Dan's recent builds. I finally got fed up working with this and never using the proper feather boards to hold the work securely.
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    Here are a few pics of the completed fence.
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    I now have a way to easily attach and adjust a feather board along with being able to change from a one piece fence to a split fence depending on what I'm doing. I even made my own wing nuts as buying them wasn't an option considering how tight money is these days. This whole fence was made from materials laying around my shop that I was tempted to throw away this past week!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
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    4,944
    Hi,

    That looks live a VERY versatile and workable fence. Your wing nuts look like they would be easier to use than the commercial kind.

    I'm confused by your layout. Where do you stand when using the router?

    Enjoy,

    Jim
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oak Harbor Washington on Whidbey Island
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    3,134
    I don't think I'm confused by where he stands, it looks like he stands in about the same position he does when running the table saw. Everybody has their preference on where to stand.

    I prefer to stand just like I would at either of my 2 shapers right along side & to the left of the arbor facing the fence I believe this gives better 2 handed control of the material being run past the router bit. Just the reason that they made shapers the way they did for safety.

    I believe if it were me & there was enough room to do it I would mount the fence on the other side of the bit & stand at the end of the extension table.

    I have my router table on the left side of my saw because I have the right side extension against the wall.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails router table A.jpg   router table B.jpg  
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
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    2,668
    It looks good. I have the same question as Jim though.
    Chinese Proverb: Man who eats many prunes gets good run for the money.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,076
    As Bart said; many folks work their router table by reaching across the table with the fence to their right. I use mine more like a shaper where I face the fence while standing a bit to the right of it, feeding right to left and following the material along for the most part. Each is a just a variation on how folks feel most comfortale operating their machine.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  6. #6
    Bart has it correct in that I stand in the front with the fence to my right. For me it's very natural this way. I tried it the other way and it never felt right. I also have the table saw for extra support as well as the out feed table. Even when I've used shapers I've never stood in front of them. My body stood at the right end and faced the same direction as the wood I was feeding thru it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
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    12,260
    Alan that looks real big and beefy.

    Can you go through explaining some of the thinking.

    Here are my questions some are just seeking clarification so i am sure i understand your build.

    Why the high rear fence?
    Does the large dust collector suction not end up sucking the object being routed into the table too much like a vacuum hold down?

    Is it me or do the sliding i presume sacrificial fences at the table level on either side of the opening stand proud of the top fence ? If so why?

    Then am I correct in understanding that positioning of the fence happens by unlocking the second table saw fence you using on the same rail and sliding that forward. So you get to use the scale on the table saw rails for front to back positioning of the fence to the bit or what would be the depth of cut?

    What bit did you rout the slots for your fences with, a T slot cutter or two separate bits?


    Then not related to the router table which castors are you using on your base, they look a nice size and thickness can you tell us where you got em?

    Also think you could show me a pic of you dust collector pipes all merging above the table saw where the router fence pipe connects?

    Thanks for sharing the build. Reminds us we dont always need the purchased stuff. I particularly like your wing nuts. Have a friend with a welder think i will ask him to make me some. Not because of saving money but because i think like Jim said the comercial ones suck.
    cheers

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    Hi,

    Thanks for the explanation. I have not done a lot with a router table. However, what I have done was with me facing 90 degrees to the wood's travel path.

    Enjoy,

    Jim
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,604
    Looks great Alan. Gives me some ideas for the new table I need to build.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Alan that looks real big and beefy.

    Can you go through explaining some of the thinking.

    Here are my questions some are just seeking clarification so i am sure i understand your build.

    Why the high rear fence?
    Glen inspired me to incorporate this feature into mine. I've done some trim on the router table that's required a tall fence for support and for feather boards but never always used them due to the fact that it wasn't readily easy to use these items.

    Does the large dust collector suction not end up sucking the object being routed into the table too much like a vacuum hold down?
    I have a 4" connect for under the table and a 4" connection on the fence. The suction is enough it will hold the piece there but not so hard that you can't easily move the piece thru the bit.

    Is it me or do the sliding i presume sacrificial fences at the table level on either side of the opening stand proud of the top fence ? If so why?
    They are in the same plane.

    Then am I correct in understanding that positioning of the fence happens by unlocking the second table saw fence you using on the same rail and sliding that forward. So you get to use the scale on the table saw rails for front to back positioning of the fence to the bit or what would be the depth of cut?
    Yes by moving the second table saw fence I can move the bit closer or further away and also use my wixey digital fence gauge.

    What bit did you rout the slots for your fences with, a T slot cutter or two separate bits?
    I used a 1/4" router bit for the first pass and then changed to a t-slot bit to finish the slot


    Then not related to the router table which castors are you using on your base, they look a nice size and thickness can you tell us where you got em?
    They are 3" swivel locking casters I got at woodcraft about 4 years ago. I think they support about 300 lbs each and were on sale for about $11 each.

    Also think you could show me a pic of you dust collector pipes all merging above the table saw where the router fence pipe connects?


    Thanks for sharing the build. Reminds us we dont always need the purchased stuff. I particularly like your wing nuts. Have a friend with a welder think i will ask him to make me some. Not because of saving money but because i think like Jim said the comercial ones suck.
    I enjoy building things like this and take even more enjoyment in using things that might have otherwise been discarded. Lately it's been more of a necessity to build than to buy just due to budget concerns.

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