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Thread: Whats the difference with these oils?

  1. #1
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    Whats the difference with these oils?

    I was at a flea market the other day just after I had finished turning a bowl project and was thinking about what finish I wanted to use on it when I found a guy selling these. He said that they were always kept in a dry basement. Each can has been opened and used but is still at least 3/4 full. Can these go bad? Whats the difference between tung oil and Danish oil? One can of the Danish oil is for (Black Walnut) and the other is (Natural). Oh...I paid $0.50 per can. I saw the can of Brasso after I paid him so he threw that in for free. I once read something about using Brasso on something and always thought that if I came across some I would buy it. I still don't remember what I wanted it for but I have it if I ever remember.
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  2. #2
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    The tung oil finish is a wipe-on varnish that may or may not actually have any tung oil in it. (Probably does have a bit.) The "natural" Danish Oil is a similar wipe-on varnish, and the "walnut" version is the same thing with some tint added.

    These finishes can indeed go bad over time, especially if they have been opened. (Exposure to oxygen is how they cure.) In my experience, when they get too old, they get thicker in viscosity and also don't completely harden when they cure. I'd suggest trying them on a piece of scrap before committing them to an important project.
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  3. #3
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    As Vaughn said the Walnut just has some tint added I have used Natural or Fruit-wood. I used Fruit-wood on my bench which has Poplar in the legs stretchers & trim.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    The tung oil finish is a wipe-on varnish that may or may not actually have any tung oil in it. (Probably does have a bit.) The "natural" Danish Oil is a similar wipe-on varnish, and the "walnut" version is the same thing with some tint added.

    These finishes can indeed go bad over time, especially if they have been opened. (Exposure to oxygen is how they cure.) In my experience, when they get too old, they get thicker in viscosity and also don't completely harden when they cure. I'd suggest trying them on a piece of scrap before committing them to an important project.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    The tung oil finish is a wipe-on varnish that may or may not actually have any tung oil in it. (Probably does have a bit.) The "natural" Danish Oil is a similar wipe-on varnish, and the "walnut" version is the same thing with some tint added.

    These finishes can indeed go bad over time, especially if they have been opened. (Exposure to oxygen is how they cure.) In my experience, when they get too old, they get thicker in viscosity and also don't completely harden when they cure. I'd suggest trying them on a piece of scrap before committing them to an important project.
    +2. Those "oils" that are packaged as "Danish Oil Finish", or those that have the word "Finish" are as Vaughn stated. They are basically a mix of an oil base varnish (resin), oil (most likely BLO), and mineral spirits. The "Tung Oil Finish" will likely have no Tung oil in it, but an oil like Soy oil.

    Those oil finishes can be a stand alone finish, and work great when wiped on. The same type mixes can be a DIY, by mixing your own recipe. You can do thirds, which is what the packaged finishes are close to. Or you can generate a finish media that reacts differently, by changing the ratios. Less oil...more varnish...will dry faster and harder. Using naptha instead of mineral spirits will afford a faster dry. An advantage of making your own is that you can make any color you want, and have a fresh batch every time. Just use measuring cups or spoons and keep track of the ratios.

    A true Tung oil will have on the label "Pure Tung oil", or "100% pure Tung oil".





    .

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Baugues View Post
    I was at a flea market the other day
    Our County landfill has a recycling place where people drop off unwanted paint, varnish, Acetone etc. Whenever I go there I get a load of it. Some I have to throw away but most of it is usable. Have you priced paint thinner lately? I probably have saved a bundle of money that way.
    As far as your can of Brasso goes, it reminds me of my days in the US Army.
    We used to polish belt buckles etc with it.

    DKT

  7. #7
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    your brasso is a one thing that can be used to rub out a finish,, its a fine abrasive
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  8. #8
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    There is a product called Japan drier you can add a drop or two to your mixture and it will quicken the drying time if you need it. I good varnish to mix with 100% tung oil is Damar varnish, Damar varsh is not cheap pre mixed but you can buy the damar crystals and make your own for about 50 cents a quart. A 1 pound bag is about 7 bucks. I use 1/3 tung 1/3 damar & 1/3 BLO. The damar quickens the drying time.
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  9. #9
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    AND keep in mind that is the stuff that starts rags on fire if not disposed of properly. Causes several house fires a year by throwing the used rags in a corner and not airing them out.
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  10. #10
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    Jay 2 ways of avoiding a fire, keep a 5 gal. bucket of water around to depose of your rags or lay them out flat to dry.
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