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Thread: Popcorn on drywall ceilings

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Popcorn on drywall ceilings

    I just saw Jim O mention that he wiped popcorn off the ceiling.

    This is right up my alley at the moment and could be one heck of a lifesaver for me.

    SO the question is can this be done and how. If i do it will the surface be able to be smooth and painted to look like another non popcorn ceiling?

    What if....popcorn was previously painted. And by painted i mean primer then eggshell paint. ??Will popcorn still remove.


    So since i now have a popcorn post next question is how does one put popcorn on the ceiling. I have two relatively small areas to be done.

    60"x36 and 76" x 38" . Have not started looking but i am hoping to find some simple way of doing this.

    H...E.....L.....P.......please.
    cheers

  2. #2
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    May 2011
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    I have always just wet it with a squirt bottle and used a 6" drywall knife to scrape it off. Once it gets wet and you break through to the drywall it usually goes pretty easy.

    As far as putting it back on.... They used to spray it with a hopper gun but you can get the paint and a special roller that will put apply it. you can find them both at big orange

  3. #3
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    I've never tried the wet way, just scrape and scrape and I think that's where the real reason for calling it 'popcorn' came into play...stuff pops right off and all over the place . I have a cove ceiling and that's where I had to be extra careful not to cause damage. I ended up rounding off the corners of the putty knife. As far as the underlying surface, you'll know when you get there ...I found one not-so-nice crack, and it could of been one reason why it was covered to begin with or, may have happened due to foundation settling . And like Rich, I found everything at HD.

  4. #4
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    Well, this worked for my sister, she just told her kids to leave the popcorn ceiling alone. Two smuggled brooms by the kids, various other toys, they had that baby as smooth as a newborn's bottom!!!!
    So get a couple of kids and carefully instruct them to not remove the little hangy thingys on the ceiling!!!
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  5. #5
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    Jonathan thats funny.

    Thanks Rich and Ken. Looks like i am in for a fun time ......NOT.
    cheers

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Jonathan thats funny.

    Thanks Rich and Ken. Looks like i am in for a fun time ......NOT.

    Safety glasses, dust mask shower cap and drop cloths and a turtleneck!

  7. #7
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    Rob, if it has been painted, it will be more trouble. Depends on how saturated they got it. If they got it real wet, the extra weight of the paint might have pulled it right off the ceiling by itself during the painting process. That obviously didn't happen. If the paint soaked through enough to bond with the drywall, then you will have a problem getting it to scrape off with the putty knife. If they just got enough on to coat the surface, you might be ok.
    I don't put the popcorn stuff back on. I do use a hopper made for doing texture on drywall. I got mine from HD many years ago, but Harbour Freight has one a lot cheaper that should work just as well. Mine came with 3 tips of different sizes for how big a "splat" of mud gets thrown out. I usually use the medium tip, and let it dry for about 30 minutes, then use a 12" blade to lightly knock down the peaks. After it fully dries, I use my bare hand to knock the loose nubs off, then prime it. I use the same method for wall texture. I have used the small tip on one room at the other house and just left it be. It was ok, but not as good as the Knock Down technique.
    Here are 2 pictures: popcorn still in the master bedroom Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	59148 And Knock Down texture in the guest bedroom Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	59147 Just for grins, 2 shots of where I am right now. Kitchen area Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	59149 From the kitchen through the Family Room. Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	59150 I have to get started on the next coat of mud, then the fun of sanding and priming hopefully by next weekend, and texturing, priming, and painting the finish coat on Labor Day weekend Somewhere in there I will need to cut in 11 or 12 can lights and wire them up. Jim.
    Coolmeadow Setters...
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  8. #8
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    Seems like a lot of folks hate popcorn ceilings. I can't understand why.
    IMHO, they are just above sliced bread in the world of great inventions.
    They hide irregularities in the ceiling, which always exist. They take away the bare look from plain painted.
    And, the greatest feature, in my opinion......drum roll please......they act as a sound deadner in a house. I have always hated the echo effect in large rooms. Popcorn absorbs much of that. That is good.
    In fact, if I could, I would outlaw plain hardwood floors. Thick wall to wall carpeting is a gift to those who wish to remain sane, especially when there are children in the house.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  9. #9
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    Yes, but: 1) cob webs are a hassle to deal with on them. 2)Can't swat a fly or other bug on it cause you can't clean off the residue. 3) Every time you bump it, it falls all over the floor. 4)It gets dusty and dirty, and can't be cleaned without knocking a good deal of it off. 5)When it's damaged, you can't repair it so that it blends in. (see 4) The knock down texture that I do hides imperfections very well. I can cut a piece out and repair it and you can't tell. Cleans up as easily as walls do. Just my opinion. Jim.
    Coolmeadow Setters...
    Exclusively Irish!
    Home of Irish Setter Rescue of North Texas
    When Irish Eyes are smiling, they're usually up to something!!
    At a minimum, I'm Pentatoxic...but most likely, I'm a Pentaholic. There seems to be no known cure. Pentatonix, winners of The Sing Off, season 3


  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim O'Dell View Post
    Yes, but: 1) cob webs are a hassle to deal with on them. 2)Can't swat a fly or other bug on it cause you can't clean off the residue. 3) Every time you bump it, it falls all over the floor. 4)It gets dusty and dirty, and can't be cleaned without knocking a good deal of it off. 5)When it's damaged, you can't repair it so that it blends in. (see 4) The knock down texture that I do hides imperfections very well. I can cut a piece out and repair it and you can't tell. Cleans up as easily as walls do. Just my opinion. Jim.

    Good points Jim. We have some and I'd really like to get rid of it. Will start on some of the smaller rooms first.

    Funny note, we had a handy man out to help do some things around here lately. While he continuously made fun of my inability to do a decent caulking job, he actually complemented me on my ability to match the knock down texture on some of the walls. The key I've found is to make sure the mixture isn't too thin, and let it dry just the right amount of time before knocking it down. I think it looks better than the popcorn and does a decent job of hiding imperfections in the dry wall job.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
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