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Thread: Why do I need a table saw?

  1. #1
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    Why do I need a table saw?

    Just like the title says, why does one really need a table saw? I can cut dados with a router. I can break down sheet goods with a track saw. What can a TS do that something else can't?

    The only thing I can't figure out right now is tenons. Other than that, I can't think of anything.

    I am really thinking of selling mine to make more room.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

  2. #2
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    Aug 2007
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    Repeatability of cut for ripping things to a certain width?
    Working accurately and safely with small pieces on a sled?
    Bevel cuts?
    Nice big flat piece of iron for setting things on?

    You'll still need room to setup a table for your track saw...
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  3. #3
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    Dec 2006
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    Yorktown, Virginia
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    Where else are you gonna put your stuff'?? If you have a miter saw, you might do without the table saw, but it really depends on the kind of work you do. I used to use it for ripping long, narrow stock for making custom moldings. Now I use my much safer band saw for most ripping. It works for tenons too. Table saw makes custom cove moldings that would be difficult otherwise. I break down sheet goods with the track saw but still use the table saw with a sled on smaller pieces like drawer parts or small box parts or, if you are a turner, segments for bowls. I also use a miter sled for small box sides and another sled for cutting splines in box corners. I'm not ready to part with mine yet, but it's value really depends on what you build.
    Last edited by Ted Calver; 09-09-2011 at 07:39 PM. Reason: spelling

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Hitchins, Kentucky (Northeastern part of the state.)
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    Steve, if you are building all the types of projects that you would like to, and you find the other tools handle those projects without any problem, then you probably won't miss the table saw. But as soon as you get rid of it, you'll need it. That's how things work for me...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Cape Cod, Ma.
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    I have routers and shapers and track saws and miter saws and a radial arm saw and skill saws and jig saws... well you get the picture.
    And I would be lost without my table saw. I find it far easier to size sheet goods than the track saw, far more accurate for dados than a router jig especially for case work. I do all my cross cutting and cut my stiles and rails for my doors and face frames on the ts. I very very rarely use my miter saw in the shop.
    Think of the time it takes to set up each cut with a track saw or a router dado jig? then look how fast you can just measure out the fence and depth of cut and cut all your pieces accordingly.

    The TS is the backbone of my shop. I couldnt do without it

  6. #6
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    One option might be downsizing your saw if.

    I don't know what you have right now, but you could always swap it out for one of the jobsite type saws that you could easily roll out of the way and roll it back when you want to use it.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Kansas City, Missouri
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    9,462
    I'd miss doing the cool pop can ring patterns on top of mine.

    The track saw could possibly do the same job, but overall I think ripping would be easier with the TS. I've done a lot of shelving and cabinet work with just a skill saw, router, and jig saw, but the quality was nothing like when using a TS.
    Darren

    ďA determined soul will do more with a rusty monkey wrench than a loafer will accomplish with all the tools in a machine shop.Ē Robert Hughes (1938-2012), Australian art critic

  8. #8
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    Mar 2008
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    NH
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    Ya don't So you just go ahead and put i in your truck and drive it on out to my house. I wont charge ya a thing for getting rid of it for ya.
    Really i did the same thing a few years back had a junk delta that you couldn't even begin to true up. So it went and I replaced it with the track saw. I have a job site saw for work that has only left my shop once scenes the big saw went. And now I am looking at getting a new cabinet saw (prolly a saw stop)so the job site saw can go back in the trailer.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  9. #9
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    Nov 2006
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    Delton, Michigan
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    chuck he has a stone table that is not right!!!!! and his only alternative is to get a new iron one or get a saw with a correct table.. i couldnt belive it till i saw it in action the groves arent parrell at all.. the miter guage wont even run threw them the same if i was him i would sell it to some poor soul and get a good one never would i be without one steve
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  10. #10
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    Yes Larry has seen the saw. Ridgid 4511. I liked it for a couple of days.

    Basically I just need room. I can't build on, to much other stuff needs done. I am going to play around with location and see what I can do.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

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