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Thread: A new turner's attempt....C and C please

  1. #1

    A new turner's attempt....C and C please

    I have been turning for about a month now and wanted to show y'all some stuff I did.

    Being that I am an extreme novice, I used Oak firewood for every item. This way if I messed up too bad, it would go into the fireplace anyway

    Please feel free to comment and criticize the work.

    Also....what do you use for finish and how far down do you sand?

    I have been going down to 800 paper and using sanding wax. Then clear varnish with CA glue for a finish. I want to try utilizing the new buffer now that I have one. So do most of you folks use Danish oil and then buff?

    Thanks in advance
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSCN1965.JPG   DSCN1966.JPG   DSCN1967.JPG   DSCN1968.JPG   DSCN1969.JPG  

    DSCN1970.JPG  
    Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!

    The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Newnan, GA
    Posts
    31
    Dom,

    I'm "novicer" than you by two weeks and not really qualified to say yea or nay. But to me, they're beautiful! Keep it up. All I've done so far is a few pens from kits that came with my midi. Not even photo worthy yet. But, hey, I'm getting there....only 500 to go.

    Joe
    "When the horse is dead....Get Off!"

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Kieve View Post
    Dom,

    I'm "novicer" than you by two weeks and not really qualified to say yea or nay. But to me, they're beautiful! Keep it up. All I've done so far is a few pens from kits that came with my midi. Not even photo worthy yet. But, hey, I'm getting there....only 500 to go.

    Joe
    Joe.....what special attachments do you need to do pens?
    Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!

    The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    bethel springs TN, but was born and raised in north east PA
    Posts
    3,132
    Dom i think your first are a lot better than my first, by far. As far as finishes i think you are gonna get a lot of different answers on this. What i do is sand to 400 don't skip grits. then i'll ether use danish oil, shellac, or blo. just depends on what i have left in the shop. next after it dries, i'll spray it with rattle can gloss lacquar. I'll put at least 4 to 6 coats on,let dry then knock down with steel wool. let sit for a week or so then wax and buff. Hope this helped a little.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Orem, Utah
    Posts
    936
    Dom, you must be of the "serious" class of newby woodturners; the kind that gets out there and turns - a lot. Shoot ... you have already matched or exceeded what I usually turn out in a year!

    Overall I think you're doing great, and you're right where you should be on the learning curve. Still, you asked for C&C, so here's my take. Remember, it's only one man's opinion....

    ====
    Pic 1
    ====
    Nice design, and pretty ambitious for an early piece. I assume that the piece on the left is the lid/cap for the piece on the right. (Can you post a pic with the pieces put together?)

    As you move along that learning curve, you'll probably find yourself turning pieces like this with somewhat thinner walls. It's a funny thing about oak though; thicker-than-usual walls seem to work somehow.

    The upper lip on the bottom piece seems a little taller than necessary.

    The "waist" on the bottom piece seems a little thin (or maybe too "abrupt" the way it goes in and back out, with no real stem) but seeing the two pieces assembled together would give a better perspective.

    I'm not sure about this, but perhaps the base should equal the max diameter of the shape above it? Again, it will be easier to "decide" when the two pieces are assembled, but my impression is that it will "feel" a little top-heavy or tippy.


    ====
    Pic 2
    ====
    I really like this one. The thick walls seem to work just fine. Perhaps the upper "lip" could be shortened a tad, but it's not bad. Good job!


    ========
    Pics 3 & 4
    ========
    What a great little "sphere"!

    If this piece is meant to hold something flammable like a tea light or candle, it should probably sit on a wider base ... like the left-side items in pics 5 and 6. It could just be the angle of the photo, but it seems almost too spherical to keep from tipping

    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    Keep on turning Dom; you're doing great!
    Last edited by Kerry Burton; 09-19-2011 at 08:10 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    936
    I've been turning for ten years. MY first tries were on where no where as good as these.

    I applaud you use of OAK. It is not the easiest wood to turn.Cudos.

    The only problem I see is in the last picture - left side. The form seems a little dumpy.

    Shortening the form, might balance it.

    Just my opinion, not necessarly a law.

    Bruce
    Last edited by Bruce Shiverdecker; 09-19-2011 at 09:07 PM.
    Bruce Shiverdecker - Retired Starving Artist ( No longer a Part timer at Woodcraft, Peoria, Il.)

    "The great thing about turning is that all you have to do is remove what's not needed and you have something beautiful. Nature does the hard part!"

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Bellinger View Post
    Dom i think your first are a lot better than my first, by far. As far as finishes i think you are gonna get a lot of different answers on this. What i do is sand to 400 don't skip grits. then i'll ether use danish oil, shellac, or blo. just depends on what i have left in the shop. next after it dries, i'll spray it with rattle can gloss lacquar. I'll put at least 4 to 6 coats on,let dry then knock down with steel wool. let sit for a week or so then wax and buff. Hope this helped a little.
    Thanks Stephen...that helps a lot
    Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!

    The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Burton View Post
    Dom, you must be of the "serious" class of newby woodturners; the kind that gets out there and turns - a lot. Shoot ... you have already matched or exceeded what I usually turn out in a year!

    Overall I think you're doing great, and you're right where you should be on the learning curve. Still, you asked for C&C, so here's my take. Remember, it's only one man's opinion....

    ====
    Pic 1
    ====
    Nice design, and pretty ambitious for an early piece. I assume that the piece on the left is the lid/cap for the piece on the right. (Can you post a pic with the pieces put together?)

    Will Do. That was my first attemp at a hollow out design. I had a real hard time getting a clean cut. Then I realized that my lathe speed was too low, and the gouge needed to be sharpened.



    As you move along that learning curve, you'll probably find yourself turning pieces like this with somewhat thinner walls. It's a funny thing about oak though; thicker-than-usual walls seem to work somehow.

    The upper lip on the bottom piece seems a little taller than necessary. How tall do you think it should be?
    The "waist" on the bottom piece seems a little thin (or maybe too "abrupt" the way it goes in and back out, with no real stem) but seeing the two pieces assembled together would give a better perspective.

    I'm not sure about this, but perhaps the base should equal the max diameter of the shape above it? Again, it will be easier to "decide" when the two pieces are assembled, but my impression is that it will "feel" a little top-heavy or tippy.


    ====
    Pic 2
    ====
    I really like this one. The thick walls seem to work just fine. Perhaps the upper "lip" could be shortened a tad, but it's not bad. Good job!


    ========
    Pics 3 & 4
    ========
    What a great little "sphere"!

    If this piece is meant to hold something flammable like a tea light or candle, it should probably sit on a wider base ... like the left-side items in pics 5 and 6. It could just be the angle of the photo, but it seems almost too spherical to keep from tipping

    The LOML said the exaxctly the same thing! Great minds................. and yes, I sized it to hold a tea light
    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    Keep on turning Dom; you're doing great!

    Thanks buddy...this really helps a lot
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2010 December 002.jpg  
    Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!

    The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Shiverdecker View Post
    I've been turning for ten years. MY first tries were on where no where as good as these.

    I applaud you use of OAK. It is not the easiest wood to turn.Cudos.

    The only problem I see is in the last picture - left side. The form seems a little dumpy.

    Shortening the form, might balance it.

    Just my opinion, not necessarly a law.

    Bruce
    That piece actually got a severe gouge on it. Hence the short height. I figured I would use it for change, car keys, etc.

    What finish do you usually use for oak? I really want to get a mittor finish on it.

    Thanks in Advance
    Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!

    The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,604
    I bought a mini lathe about a year and a half ago. I was really interested in turning pens and some bowls.

    I turned a few bowls that looked no where near as good as yours. They look pretty darn good to me.

    I just can't seem to get away from flatwork but I still have the urge from time to time to turn something. When that happens Larry pm's and slaps me behind the head
    Faith, Hope & Charity

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