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Thread: Speaking of Hot Deals on Drum Sanders

  1. #1
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    Speaking of Hot Deals on Drum Sanders

    Looks like the Drum Sander Fairy that visited Rennie dropped by my house, too. Now all I've got to do is figure out where to put it. This puppy is a lot heavier than I thought it'd be. It was about all I could do to lift it onto the tablesaw.

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    With the infeed and outfeed tables, it's also a lot longer than I'd expected.

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    My buddy also had a few boxes of abrasives. The strips in the small box have only been lightly used, and the three bigger boxes are still nearly full.

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    There's a small tear in the feed belt that seems to be OK with its duct tape patch, but at some point it'll need replacing. It has the 2" dust collection port, but I had a 2" to 4" adapter, and my Harbor Freight DC seemed to handle it fine. I tried the sander on a small piece of resawn bloodwood that I had laying around. It did a good job, but I also learned that bloodwood burns pretty easily, and when it does, it gums up the sandpaper.

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    I tried my rubber sandpaper cleaner stick a bit (with the drum spinning) and didn't have much luck removing the burned resin. I'll scrub on it some more with the drum stopped, but if I can't fix it, I've at least got sandpaper to replace it.

    Oh yeah...the price. I'm "storing" it for a contractor buddy on my pool league team, but since I'll use it from time to time, I decided not to charge him any storage fees. (He doesn't plan to take it back.) He told me he used it about eight times a number of years ago, and it has sat unused since. (The invoice date on the sandpaper boxes is from 2001.) He bought it to do his own cabinet doors, then decided it was just easier and more cost effective to just buy them ready-made.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  2. #2
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    You must be living right Vaughn. That is fantastic. I'm so jealous
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  3. #3
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    So that you can sand bloodwood and other "gummy" woods, is there a speed control on the roller or feed table to speed up the wood passing through?
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Shively View Post
    So that you can sand bloodwood and other "gummy" woods, is there a speed control on the roller or feed table to speed up the wood passing through?
    Yes, but I was running it at full speed. I'm pretty sure I was trying to take too deep of pass. Then once the burn was on the sandpaper, it didn't go away no matter how light the cut was. here's going to be a bit of learning curve in figuring out what's "enough" and what's "too much".
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    That is a learning curve I hope to encounter in my shop someday. Congrats on the great score!!!
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  6. #6
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    Delton, Michigan
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    dont know where your speed adjustment is but you want slower feed rate than drum speed and lighter cut to avoid what you have got from your blood wood.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  7. #7
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    I have burnt a lot of paper before I figured out how not too. Still don't know if I am correct, but I turn the handle 1/16 and make a pass. Slow as all get out, but works well and doesn't eat paper.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

  8. #8
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    You lucky you.

    Congrats!

    Hope you didn't lift it by yourself. You could have called me.
    Chinese Proverb: Man who eats many prunes gets good run for the money.

  9. #9
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    Nov 2006
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    I would worry about a duct tape patch on the feed belt. I ran for years with small tears at the edge of the feed belt cut out in a gentle curve, so the work would not be raised by the thickness of a patch.

    When I finally replaced my feed belt, it was about $50-60. When I complained on some forum, some people suggested that they just bought a custom sandpaper belt of the specified size, at roughly 1/3 the cost.

    See my suggestion on the ammeter in the other performax post.

    A faster feed speed with a shallower cut works better than a heavy cut (it is only 1 1/2 hp, while most drum sanders are at least 5 hp). The faster speed keeps the wood cooler.

    I found that 180 grit was "very fine" - the 220 grit I tried was almost useless.

    A power washer, with the belt spread on a sidewalk (hold the ends with a brick) does the best I have found for cleaning the belts. I sometimes sprayed the tough spots with Simple Green before washing. The sun dries them in an hour or so. The erasers make them look better cosmetically, but doesn't do a thing for cleaning grunge - I threw away my eraser.

    If you have your sander where the sun shines on it, put a piece of plywood/masonite over the belt when it isn't being used. The sun seems to be why my feed belt dried and tore.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  10. #10
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    I'm with Charley so far as being concerned about the patched feed belt. It's just waiting to tear off - likely just when you're working on a job that can't wait.

    Klingspor has replacement drive belts. I recently bought one for my 10-20, and they're a much better quality than the OEM belt was.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

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