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Thread: Spoons (stressing out my scrollsaw)

  1. #1
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    Spoons (stressing out my scrollsaw)

    I got the hankering for some sawdust today, but didn't want to do any fretwork on the scrollsaw. As John will attest, I love stressing my scrollsaw blades by cutting thicker stock than most folks would think of trying.
    Today's project are a few blanks which I'll shape with my router, spoon plane and probably dremel and 80 grit plane into some wooden spoons. I started out with a piece of dunnowood.

    I drew a spoon shape on it and began cutting. You'd have thought I had a bucking bronco on the table, not a 3/8 thick piece of wood. Now I'm used to holding the workpiece down on my saw, as I don't have hold down feet on it, but this was Not normal. I couldn't for the life of me figure out what was wrong, until after I finished the cut.

    Then it hit me, the jumping was from the blade pulling UP on the wood. Normally the teeth pull the workpiece down into the table, holding it down, except for the last 3/4 " or so on a reverse tooth blade (which I prefer) Time to check the blade out;sure enough, my son had been the last one to use the saw, and he had installed the blade upside down!

    I flipped the blade end for end and finished cutting out another blank, this one out of 3/4 Maple.

    That is where the 'stressing out' comes in. Ever try and cut 3/4 rock maple with a #5 blade? slow and steady is the only way to get the job done, eventually. I still have to hold the wood down , but it is just the normal amount for my saw.
    Here is the maple cut out.

    As you can see I'm working on another smaller maple spoon as well. For reference, the larger blank is just over 12" long, the smaller one I'd estimate at about 6".

    Isn't the figure in there pretty? Going to be a very nice spoon, once I'm done.


    __
    Last edited by Ned Bulken; 03-05-2007 at 12:31 AM.
    -Ned

  2. #2
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    Ned, They look good. I just receiced a old scroll saw and find it very relaxeing. I could imagin that cutting rock maple would really stress the blades. Keep up the exellent work.
    Al

  3. #3
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    Thanks Al,
    that scrollsaw, plus my two drill/drivers and a smattering of other smaller tools are about all I have to work with at the house. My buddy Grizz (Jim Capozzi) is out of town this weekend, so I've been sawdust free. Spoons are something I can meddle even with my scrollsaw. I've done several in cherry, and thought maple would be a challenge. Now I get to drag out my spoon plane, spokeshave and see what shape the blanks 'want' to be.
    -Ned

  4. #4
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    I just get the little x's, no pics.
    Jim

  5. #5
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    Yer lucky Jim, I didn't even get any x's

  6. #6
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    sorry guys, moved the images in photobucket, let me go fix them,
    all fixed, should be good to go now:
    Last edited by Ned Bulken; 03-05-2007 at 12:33 AM.
    -Ned

  7. #7
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    Now I sees 'em. Looking good Ned.

  8. #8
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    I rummaged around and found 'all' of the rough and tumble wooden spoons I've made the past couple of years,
    they're kinda lumpy, but they're well used and abused in our kitchen. (mineral oil, where did that bottle go?)





    cherry for most of them, the spreader is butternut and the fred flintstone special on the end is maple (my first small spoon attempt, funky but I keep it around for sentimental purposes)

    I used to be a night dispatcher at a trucking terminal. and got really tired of those little plastic stir-sticks

    so I made this:


    and showing the bowl a little better.
    -Ned

  9. #9
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    Looks great Ned, thanks for sharing!!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
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    Ned, you do nice work!

    I think if I ever tried making a spoon it might only be good for stirring around corners! It's great that you can turn out something so useful in such a short time!
    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

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