Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Project: How to stack cut on the Scroll Saw

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
    Posts
    5,533

    Project: How to stack cut on the Scroll Saw

    How to Stack cut on the Scroll Saw

    Hi gang,
    I'm actually Home tonight, so I thought I would do a little scrolling. Since there were so many nice comments on the 12 days of christmas project last week, I thought I would share my process of scrolling... and since I do have the nice camera, I documented it step by step. I dragged the images through photoshop and resized them so they shouldn't be too large for the average user. ENjoy!

    Continued...
    -Ned

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
    Posts
    5,533
    I scroll to relax, and it can be nearly as 'immediate' as turning for a finished project, depending on the complexity. I picked a simple pattern for this project: in this case, the pumpkin in the middle of this image.

    I cut two strips of 1/8" ply to width, then sized them to the pattern:





    Once I have the stack the proper size, I tape the 4 edges together with masking tape, and tape the top face as well. The pattern then gets a quick dose of spray cement:



    no affiliation, but this little can is readily available at your local craft shop:



    After a minute to let it get tacky, I apply it to the stack, and then cover the top with clear packing tape, which helps lubricate the blade (lengthens the blade life) and keeps the pattern from lifting off in case the low tack glue gives up.

    continued...
    -Ned

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
    Posts
    5,533
    Once I have the stack prepped, I turn to the drill press, and make pilot holes for all of the interior cuts, and usually one near the exterior, which makes the final exterior cut easier.


    here it is, ready to cut,



    Some basic scroll saw how to: generally you should cut from the center outward, as the piece gets weaker structurally the more material you remove. This piece was only 2x3" so I wasn't too worried about that.

    Here's the first two sections cut out: note that on skinny cuts which end in a point, I usually cut toward the point.



    rear of the same section:


    Again, I cut toward the point wherever possible, and I try to start at an 'outside' corner:



    Sometimes you don't have a 'good' start point, such as the eyes of the pumpkin in this piece. At that point, I start the pilot in the center, cut to the line, make a 90 degree turn and cut counter clockwise. (Most blades are stamped, and their teeth are set so that a counter clockwise cut is smoother than clockwise).

    look closely at the 'right' eye, I drew some arrows showing how I cut out the left eye.


    Experienced scroll sawyers can make very sharp turns, so from the entry point, I cut to the line, and all the way around to the right corner of the eye. At that point, I stop the saw, and re thread from the pilot hole. Cutting clockwise into the corner, this can give a crisper corner than the reversal technique. In this cut I think the results were about even.

    When it came to the mouth, I did things a little different. I wanted crisp teeth and corners, so I cut towards the corners of the mouth:


    here's how that looked on the back:

    there is only one pilot, the other 'hole' is where I looped the workpiece to make the tooth crisp and clean. That works, but only where you have lots of scrap 'room' to maneuver.

    I tried a different technique on the other corner. After I made the cut on the top section, I widened the cut a bit at the corner:




    This allowed me to reverse the blade into the corner, and then make one long smooth cut all along the bottom curve of the mouth:



    This shot also shows how I hold a piece, keeping my fingers out of the path of the blade in case the piece jumps.

    continued...
    Last edited by Ned Bulken; 10-13-2011 at 03:38 AM.
    -Ned

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
    Posts
    5,533

    I slipped just a bit, and cut through the outer edge of the stack when I cut the exterior out... amazingly without going through the tape holding the stack together.



    Once I had the stack cut out, I peeled back the pattern, and then the masking tape from the face of the top piece:



    here is the back of the bottom piece: this shows typical tear out on the back of the stack. which is easily dealt with with a piece of 240 grit sandpaper:

    Last edited by Ned Bulken; 10-13-2011 at 03:51 AM.
    -Ned

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
    Posts
    5,533
    I also cut out this pattern:




    along with a few miniatures:




    I also decorated the 'shop' a bit:





    Thanks for looking, hope you got something out of the process!
    -Ned

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,015
    Great write-up, Ned.

    OK, I've gotta know...where'd you get the sign?
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
    Posts
    5,533
    iirc Leo Voisine made that for me...
    -Ned

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,604
    You got me thinking about dusting off my scroll saw. Nice write up Ned
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
    Posts
    6,098
    Very nice write up Ned. That takes time to do it like you did documenting it. Thank you. What blade/blades are you using for this? When stack cutting or cutting the "critters" that are obviously thicker, what speeds are you using for each??

    Oh, love the sign!!
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Thomasville, GA
    Posts
    5,992
    Great tutorial, Ned!

    I've done a little scrolling - pieces to go on larger projects - always think about stuff like you showed but get busy on other things. LOML's co-workers have asked if I would make name plates for them like the one I did for her years ago. Any secrets to whipping out something like that?
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

Similar Threads

  1. Hey Rob, This would be a project for your Scroll Saw!
    By Dan Mooney in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-07-2012, 03:08 PM
  2. Rockler has a 6" Dado Stack
    By Ned Bulken in forum Hot Deals
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-15-2009, 07:43 PM
  3. Stack Dado Question?
    By Charles Hans in forum New Tools
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 12-20-2008, 05:11 PM
  4. Wow results with my old dado stack . . .
    By Jerry Palmer in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-25-2008, 09:42 AM
  5. Freud 508 Dado Stack for about $135....
    By Mark Rios in forum Hot Deals
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-20-2007, 08:58 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •