Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: How to Draw Reproducible Accurate and Precise Gridlines?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Courtenay/Comox Valley, British Columbia
    Posts
    3,220

    Question How to Draw Reproducible Accurate and Precise Gridlines?

    I hope to inspire a good discussion here. I'm interested in making a special type of game board for an ancient game called "Go". A Go board has gridlines that look like this. Those little circles may or may not be included. My son plays competitively.

    The old masters in Japan do it like this. They use some kind of blade that is coated in some kind of lacquer and rocked across the wood. I don't read Japanese......

    So without going on and on about this interesting and ancient game. I'd like to hear some suggestions on how to do this, as getting these gridlines onto the board is going to be the most difficult part of the project. I have read everything I can find about this, but most of the people who are making these boards are not woodworkers, they are Go players and aren't using perhaps the best or most efficient methods.

    Required:

    1. The lines are a prescribed thickness and must be evenly spaced.

    2. The lines are spaced a different amount in one direction as opposed to the other; they are wider in one orientation that the other.

    3. The lines are thin, like 1mm

    4. If they are cut in rather than drawn on, then they have to be filled so that when the board is finished the top is flat--you do not want to be able to *feel* the lines.

    5. If lines are drawn on, I don't want them to bleed--initially *or* after it's finished (coated) with something.

    6. I also need some kind of method that is reproducible so I don't have to keep reinventing the wheel every time I make a board like this.

    I've been puzzling over this for a long time. Puzzling until my puzzler is sore (didn't the Grinch say that?). One thing I considered was having a permanent template made of gridlines cut into either metal or acrylic, laying it on top of the wood, and then....what? cutting it? drawing it? I also wondered if I could cut the lines in the top of the board, then flood it with dye, and sand off the surface, where the dye would remain only in the cut lines........

    Tell me how you would approach this project. And I can't wait to hear what Ken C. is going to suggest.

    Thank you.
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
    AKA The Rookie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Catalunya
    Posts
    4,632
    My question would be:
    Do you want those lines drawn or incised as in the pics?

    If you would have them drawn or incised I would look for a friend who has access to a cutting plotter, or CNC milling machine. Draw the lines on a cad software and use the plotter to draw or incise them ( depending on the type of plotter) Some sample making plotter have the possibility of actually milling lines, which thickness will depend on the milling bit.

    Milling those lines on the back of a acrylic sheet would rend them opaque seen from the other side leaving a complete smooth surface to play on if that's what you want. The drawing should be mirrored on the CAD software before milling.

    The other possibility is using a lot of care and what we call here a "paralex ruler" that is (was) used to draw parallel lines, and special calibrated tip markers ( for technical drawing) with permanent ink. Some finishing trials are mandatory in any case.

    A metal ruler clamped at the right points would allow you inscribe the lines with a marking knife without fearing of moving the ruler. A rather painstaking process but would work.

    My question is: Does it need to precise to one thousand?

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by Toni Ciuraneta; 10-31-2011 at 07:06 PM.
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449
    Wood engraving machine (laser) would be the best bet if you are making a number of them. Make an arrangement with someone that has one.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,014
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Satko View Post
    Wood engraving machine (laser) would be the best bet if you are making a number of them. Make an arrangement with someone that has one.
    Bill had the same idea I do. The laser is very accurate and repeatable. Another possibility might be silk screen printing.

    You mentioned flooding grooves with dye. I doubt that will give you the results you're looking for. The dye will bleed and not stay withing the lines.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Spitting distance north of Detroit Michigan
    Posts
    3,798
    Quote Originally Posted by Cynthia White View Post
    ... And I can't wait to hear what Ken C. is going to suggest. ...
    私は見当もつかないない
    多分金属のテンプレートと木のバーナー?


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Courtenay/Comox Valley, British Columbia
    Posts
    3,220
    Thanks for the ideas so far!

    Toni, no it doesn't have to be good to 1/1000. how about 1/100. I'm not a machine, so if it has the small errors that handmade things have, that's okay with me. If the lines are really out of whack, then it would be distracting for the players.

    Toni, I considered the acrylic or metal template only for the purposes of making the marks on the wood, not to use as a surface.

    Vaughn, you can silk screen on wood? But then you still have to draw the grid on the screen.......I'm assuming 1mm lines is too narrow for inlay?

    Bill and Vaughn, a wood laser engraving machine? Didn't know there was such a thing. So this is something that can be programmed to engrave whatever lines you want? of course, then the lines are engraved. They still would have to be made black, and filled in so the board surface is flat. What do you say about that?

    Ken, I'm sure it's a good one!
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
    AKA The Rookie

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,014
    Cynthia, the lines left by a laser engraver on wood are already dark, and paint can be added to the grooves (then sanded off the surface) to make them fully black. On some woods, the lines are already pretty black. Have a look at some of the work Pete Simmons (a member here) does with his.

    http://www.laserimagearts.com/

    If you're wanting a flush surface, you should be able to get it by building up layers of shellac or lacquer and lightly sanding it until the whole surface is flush. Mush like filling the grain on porous woods.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Santa Claus, In
    Posts
    4,779
    http://www5e.biglobe.ne.jp/~rozan/memori.htm Looks like a good idea here. Not sure what they are saying but the pictures lead to hand operation.

    So what if you build a jig and use a metal straight edge. Then cut the lines with an x-atco knife?
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you don’t know what tool to buy next, then you probably don’t need it yet.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Courtenay/Comox Valley, British Columbia
    Posts
    3,220
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Southwood View Post
    So what if you build a jig and use a metal straight edge. Then cut the lines with an x-atco knife?
    Can you give me an idea what you mean here? How to do that?
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
    AKA The Rookie

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Santa Claus, In
    Posts
    4,779
    Just look at the pictures. Surely you can come with something. I was thinking using a 2 foot straight rule. Some dowels to locate the rule. Just use your imagination.
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you don’t know what tool to buy next, then you probably don’t need it yet.

Similar Threads

  1. Draw leaf table
    By Wout Louwers in forum Designs, Plans and Sketches
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-07-2010, 11:18 AM
  2. (Re)Produce Accurate Arcs
    By Frank Townend in forum New Tools
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-31-2008, 09:49 AM
  3. Who Needs a Computer to Draw Furniture?
    By Dave Richards in forum Designs, Plans and Sketches
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 07-11-2008, 12:35 PM
  4. How to draw an arch in SU?
    By Charlie Schultz in forum Designs, Plans and Sketches
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-04-2007, 05:19 PM
  5. SKETCHUP Draw Leaf Table
    By Dave Richards in forum Designs, Plans and Sketches
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-08-2007, 01:37 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •